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Forum » SpaceEngine » Off-topic Discussions » The Future of Humanity & Intelligent life in the universe
The Future of Humanity & Intelligent life in the universe
apenpaapDate: Sunday, 20.01.2013, 13:45 | Message # 76
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A number of them are pretty likely, a number (even on the left side) are ridiculous. The immortal mouse sounds to me like wishful thinking, and of course the 10 kilometre building is ridiculous. At some point, certain people's desire to compensate for other matters is going to run into construction difficulties that will make the costs way too high, and I doubt this point lies above 2 km.

Quote (midtskogen)
It might be tempting to think that an old civilisation like the mediterranian a couple of thousand years ago was close to reaching the industrial revolution and could perhaps have sent a man too the moon in the 5th century, if the political situation had been more stable and if science/philosophy had been less comfortable in trusting old authority, but I think there were too few people on earth then to make a revolution happen.


Well, Han China and Rome had pretty large populations at the time; much larger than 18th century England, where the Industrial Revolution started. However, I agree that the Industrial Revolution would've likely gone slower if it had happened at the time (if steam power was in common usuage in 450, there probably wouldn't have been a human on the Moon in 569). However, the biggest problem was probably truly that ancient science was usually more like philosophy. The complete trust in old authority was part of it, but I think an even more major part was the complete trust in theory over practice. The concept of doing experiments to verify whether the theories you'd thought up were actually right was missing. There was also a distinct lack of interest in science in the Roman Empire from the second century onward.





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HarbingerDawnDate: Sunday, 20.01.2013, 13:57 | Message # 77
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Quote (apenpaap)
I doubt this point lies above 2 km.

I wouldn't rule out a 3 km building at some point, but yeah there will certainly never be a need for such a large structure.

Quote (apenpaap)
I think an even more major part was the complete trust in theory over practice.

This was not true. Many of the ancient scientists/philosophers believed in experiment, but that philosophy eventually lost out to the one that simple thought was sufficient to gain understanding.

Quote (apenpaap)
There was also a distinct lack of interest in science in the Roman Empire from the second century onward.

Very true. Rome was never very science-oriented as I understand it, and in its later years it was quite content with its bread and circuses and religious squabbles. What few strongholds of ancient science remained were eventually extinguished by the early Church and by general unpopularity.





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midtskogenDate: Sunday, 20.01.2013, 15:26 | Message # 78
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Quote (apenpaap)
However, the biggest problem was probably truly that ancient science was usually more like philosophy.

The distinction is quite recent. Today's meaning of "philosophy" is narrower than what it used to be. Newton wrote about "philosophia naturalis", which we now should translate as "natural science".





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VoekoevakaDate: Sunday, 20.01.2013, 15:49 | Message # 79
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Quote (apenpaap)
However, the biggest problem was probably truly that ancient science was usually more like philosophy.

It is not the distinction between science and philosophy thats lets the industrial revolution rise, but it is the new concept of rigor, from Descartes, among others. The rigor makes the science more exact (Lavoisier's principle), and, with a more accurate science, humans can create new technologies such as the steam engine.
Don't forget that Descartes is a philosoph too.





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DisasterpieceDate: Monday, 21.01.2013, 03:39 | Message # 80
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Quote (DoctorOfSpace)
I'd love to see that.

I do love a pretty pyrotechnics show.





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expandoDate: Monday, 21.01.2013, 10:11 | Message # 81
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New pill called TA-65 exists which lengthens telomeres. people have reported results but never expensive, close to $300 for 30 day supply.

otherwise you can always try magnetic rings from www.alexchiu.com $10.





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DoctorOfSpaceDate: Monday, 21.01.2013, 11:40 | Message # 82
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Quote (expando)
otherwise you can always try magnetic rings from www.alexchiu.com $10.


That sounds like magic.





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HarbingerDawnDate: Monday, 21.01.2013, 12:33 | Message # 83
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Quote (expando)
New pill called TA-65 exists which lengthens telomeres. people have reported results but never expensive, close to $300 for 30 day supply. otherwise you can always try magnetic rings from www.alexchiu.com $10.

Quote (Forum Rules)
Any advertising... is strongly prohibited.





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midtskogenDate: Saturday, 30.03.2013, 21:52 | Message # 84
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An interesting read.




NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
Antza2Date: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 15:56 | Message # 85
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1:04:00 forward





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DoctorOfSpaceDate: Saturday, 05.10.2013, 22:37 | Message # 86
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Pretty much what I keep saying





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HarbingerDawnDate: Sunday, 06.10.2013, 00:16 | Message # 87
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Quote (DoctorOfSpace)
Pretty much what I keep saying

Yes, I was just thinking to myself today about your prediction that everyone would take up gardening in a century tongue

With my nanofabricator, I'd make a spacecraft and go explore the planets. Other people can keep their gardens. Though I'd rather they discover a way to digitize my mind into a computer so I wouldn't have to, and I could explore any place I want using robotic probes as extensions of myself smile





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HarbingerDawnDate: Sunday, 06.10.2013, 00:58 | Message # 88
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Quote (DoctorOfSpace)
Obviously the whole point of gardening is to feed what you produce to the nanofabricator so it can make better things for you to occupy your time with.

Not according to Burke.





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DoctorOfSpaceDate: Sunday, 06.10.2013, 01:04 | Message # 89
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)

Not according to Burke.


Also would be entirely pointless considering all the things to make the plants and gardens is available in the soil making the whole process pointless when you have an army of nanobots at your disposal.

Just feed the fabricator dirt. I wish cryogenics were a proven science so I could just freeze myself for the next 50+ years.





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Edited by DoctorOfSpace - Sunday, 06.10.2013, 01:06
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Sunday, 06.10.2013, 01:14 | Message # 90
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Quote (DoctorOfSpace)
Just feed the fabricator dirt.

Slightly off-topic, in a fictional universe I created a long time ago everything was made with nano fabricators and a major source of material for them were mountains, so many mountainous regions in the world were partially flattened. Also, the material was not just converted into material goods, but also into isotopes of hydrogen, etc. for use in fusion reactors, which were the primary source of energy generation.

Quote (DoctorOfSpace)
I wish cryogenics were a proven science so I could just freeze myself for the next 50+ years.

Yeah sad Or rather, I wish I could sleep for a couple of months, then be awake for a week, then sleep for a couple more months, and so on. I wouldn't want to miss out on all the exciting things that happened in the interim smile





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Edited by HarbingerDawn - Sunday, 06.10.2013, 01:16
 
Forum » SpaceEngine » Off-topic Discussions » The Future of Humanity & Intelligent life in the universe
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