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Show off your work
spacerDate: Tuesday, 04.10.2016, 17:58 | Message # 1066
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Israel
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beautiful. there is snow and ice so early there. while here we still have 30c in october




"we began as wanderers, and we are wanderers still"
-carl sagan

-space engine photographer
 
midtskogenDate: Tuesday, 04.10.2016, 20:25 | Message # 1067
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All due to something we don't see often:


Some places reached 1052 hPa today.

Attachments: 6117698.jpg(61Kb)





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
spacerDate: Tuesday, 04.10.2016, 21:13 | Message # 1068
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midtskogen, that neat, its like the pressure in the dead sea area (-400 meters). about 1.05 earth atmospheres (x1.05 sea level)
i am very interested in weather too and i watch maps every day. can you explain what high pressure zones means with weather?
for what i remember low pressure zones over israel (less than 1000 hpa) came with lot of snow and cold air.

saw that image too:





"we began as wanderers, and we are wanderers still"
-carl sagan

-space engine photographer


Edited by spacer - Wednesday, 05.10.2016, 00:50
 
WatsisnameDate: Sunday, 30.10.2016, 21:38 | Message # 1069
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I found the edge of the world.



What's beyond that? Nobody knows.

Slowly I drift, into the void.



Swallowed by the endless mist.





 
powermoneywomenDate: Saturday, 05.11.2016, 14:52 | Message # 1070
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http://www.powermoneywomen.com/sitephotos.html

See the second photo of the link i provided.....it was so weird that i had to share.....mars....is that another crab?
 
WatsisnameDate: Sunday, 06.11.2016, 05:19 | Message # 1071
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Exploring the beauty and complete counter-intuitiveness of diffraction. smile All shots taken using a green (532nm) laser passing through various apertures.

A tiny hole just barely punched through a note card with a push-pin:



Through less symmetrical holes. Still makes a symmetrical pattern!





What happens when the laser is passed through three small holes in a tight triangle formation? Something crazy:



And finally, a 'single slit' experiment, with the slit becoming narrower.



The laser is being passed through the gap in a toenail clipper. In the first frame, the gap is about the width of a human hair (~0.1mm). In the last (visible) frame, the gap is down to about 5 micrometers (about the length of a typical bacterium). And how's this for counter-intuitive? The gap is horizontal! surprised





 
AlekDate: Sunday, 06.11.2016, 08:08 | Message # 1072
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Quote Watsisname ()
And how's this for counter-intuitive? The gap is horizontal!


Wait what? That is really weird...it shouldn't be possible for the light to re-arrange itself like that...





Living among the stars, I find my way. I grow in strength through knowledge of the space I occupy, until I become the ruler of my own interstellar empire of sorts. Though The world was made for the day, I was made for the night, and thus, the universe itself is within my destiny.
 
WatsisnameDate: Sunday, 06.11.2016, 13:00 | Message # 1073
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It is probably the least intuitive thing I know in all of physics. smile It's like that because we're so used to light behaving like rays, going in straight lines, not canceling out with itself...

But here we are seeing the wave-like properties of light. Water waves actually provide a very good visual analogue for it:



Notice that with water waves as with light, the waves spread out more when the aperture is similar in size to the wavelength. It's useful to think of each point on the wave front as a source for a new spherical wave. Then the question is how do those new waves interfere with each other as they travel? Peaks meeting with with peaks make brightness. Peaks with troughs make darkness. Once we work through the geometry of it, it begins to make a bit more sense how the diffraction pattern forms. And yet, even with that understanding, to actually see it still strikes me as totally odd. Water waves are one thing, but it's hard to imagine light being like that.

We can also find the diffraction pattern produced by an aperture by taking the Fourier Transform of the aperture. The Fourier Transform is well known in signal analysis, but it also applies in 2D and even higher dimensions, and it has use in optics. Here's the transform of three rough-edged circles in a triangle pattern:



Pretty close to the diffraction pattern photographed.

And the transform for a horizontal slit:



Crudely drawn smiley face? smile






 
WatsisnameDate: Friday, 11.11.2016, 12:44 | Message # 1074
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Snow geese from Siberia. happy












 
spacerDate: Friday, 11.11.2016, 12:49 | Message # 1075
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Watsisname, beautiful images. i like the mountains in the back too!




"we began as wanderers, and we are wanderers still"
-carl sagan

-space engine photographer
 
LookAtDatDakkaDate: Sunday, 13.11.2016, 00:13 | Message # 1076
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Here what I would imagine Space Engine in the future:



Rendered in Blender 2.78 with noise addition

In other words, Watsisname, nice flocks of birds.





NVIDIA 960 GTX 2048MB

Edited by LookAtDatDakka - Sunday, 13.11.2016, 03:57
 
HornblowerDate: Sunday, 13.11.2016, 00:40 | Message # 1077
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LookAtDatDakka, That's what it looks like now! (actually looks better than it does in your picture, but nice render)

Edited by Hornblower - Sunday, 13.11.2016, 00:49
 
AlekDate: Sunday, 13.11.2016, 03:29 | Message # 1078
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Quote LookAtDatDakka ()
Rendered in Blender 2.78


Hm...could've mistaken it for a Grand Designer image with some after editing





Living among the stars, I find my way. I grow in strength through knowledge of the space I occupy, until I become the ruler of my own interstellar empire of sorts. Though The world was made for the day, I was made for the night, and thus, the universe itself is within my destiny.
 
midtskogenDate: Sunday, 13.11.2016, 14:41 | Message # 1079
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Today's NZ earthquake as recorded by my seismometer in Oslo 160 degrees (nearly 18000 km) away:

Attachments: 5210098.png(14Kb)





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
WatsisnameDate: Sunday, 13.11.2016, 23:10 | Message # 1080
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Wow. surprised

For being 160° away from epicenter, I was curious what information about the Earth's inner structure are apparent in the recording. Here's an interesting graphic which lays it all out.

Your recording looks very consistent with it, showing a ~20 minute delay between the quake and the wave arrival. The first to arrive are pressure waves that passed through both the outer and inner core. Then there are waves that were refracted through the outer core, and then the pressure wave which was reflected once off the surface. I think that may be the spike you see at around 11:28. The rest are surface waves and further reflections. And there are no direct shear waves, since they can't pass through the liquid outer core.





 
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