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Forum » SpaceEngine » Off-topic Discussions » Show off your work (Show off interesting projects you've created...)
Show off your work
parameciumkidDate: Wednesday, 16.12.2015, 11:13 | Message # 886
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I'm slowly trying to get better at 3D modeling, so here's a spaceship I started making today. I have yet to add most of the fine details like greeble, point defense turrets, etc.





Intel HD Graphics 4000 ;P
 
DoctorOfSpaceDate: Saturday, 19.12.2015, 16:36 | Message # 887
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Quote Watsisname ()
~Alpenglow~

Quote Watsisname ()
~Frost~


You have some really nice scenery.

Quote Billy_Mayes ()
Haven't posted in ages. Blender render I did.


The lighting in that is really nice

Quote Antza2 ()
Couple of macro shots after quite a long break.


The wick looks pretty wicked

Quote parameciumkid ()
so here's a spaceship I started making today.


Pretty decent I like that.




More IR stuff

Got tired of how short the battery life is on the FLIR One. It has it's own internal battery that dies in around an hour of use so I bought an external 20,000 mAh battery


The world is an entirely different place in IR






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SalvoDate: Saturday, 19.12.2015, 19:18 | Message # 888
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Quote DoctorOfSpace ()
The world is an entirely different place in IR

Totally agree.

Have you tried to look at the Wi-Fi repeater/mobile phone or at the TV remote? It's probably a too much weak radiation but if you could "see" it... that would be awesome!





The universe is not required to be in perfect harmony with human ambition.

CPU: Intel Core i7 4770 GPU: ASUS Radeon R9 270 RAM: 8 GBs

(still don't know why everyone is doing this...)


Edited by Salvo - Saturday, 19.12.2015, 19:18
 
DoctorOfSpaceDate: Saturday, 19.12.2015, 22:03 | Message # 889
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Quote Salvo ()
Have you tried to look at the Wi-Fi repeater/mobile phone


Those don't broadcast their signals in IR.

However they do get quite warm


Quote Salvo ()
TV remote


The lights on a TV remote are near IR. The IR sensor on the FLIR does not pick up those lights but the visible camera can see them.





Intel Core i7-5820K 4.2GHz 6-Core Processor
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WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 29.12.2015, 07:50 | Message # 890
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The salmon have spawned. Their time is ending. Today, it is a time for eagles.






 
Destructor1701Date: Tuesday, 29.12.2015, 12:55 | Message # 891
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*Lord Of The Rings music*




 
DoctorOfSpaceDate: Tuesday, 29.12.2015, 19:00 | Message # 892
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Quote Watsisname ()
it is a time for eagles.






Really nice shots





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midtskogenDate: Tuesday, 29.12.2015, 20:40 | Message # 893
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Nice shots, Watsisname. When I was more active with photography I dreamt of taking shots like that, but my camera only had manual focus and it was next to impossible.




NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 29.12.2015, 23:00 | Message # 894
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Heh, I actually ended up going manual focus for many of these. The auto wasn't very reliable when they were flying, or within a lot of tree limbs. More often than not it would ruin an otherwise amazing shot, and I thought "the heck with this, I can do better." My mindset also makes me less annoyed if I lose a shot because I messed up than if my equipment doesn't do what I want it to.

Buuut, yeah, capturing them in flight with manual focus is hard. I've become fairly adept at it, but still, for every good shot, there are several more that are blurred. For wildlife photography I pretty much go in expecting to get something like a 1:10 ratio of keepers to throwaways. On this outing I took 421 shots, of which 46 turned out really well. (Thank you, digital cameras -- I cannot imagine doing this on film!) wacko





 
midtskogenDate: Thursday, 31.12.2015, 18:38 | Message # 895
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I've been working on finding the trajectory of a meteor which was likely visible for 1-2 minutes over Norway 27th December. It was an Earth grazer and the data shows that it went back into space!

I had data from one of our video cameras and the final clues came from a lucky photographer (Geir Øye) who captured the meteor before it disappeared below the horizon:


Which I calibrated and reprojected:


The solution:


A rare meteor! May be the first confirmed Earth grazer in Norway. I got another one on video in 2012, though. It appeared in Skagerrak and went on for two minutes or so across the UK and Ireland. http://norskmeteornettverk.no/bilder/2015/meteor-20120921.mp4

EDIT: The 2012 Earth grazer was a cool bonus. While working on the 27th Dec grazer I became aware of a paper on the 2012 grazer, and I noticed that it should have been visible from my camera. So I checked my video archive, and there it was. I didn't know I had recorded it. I think my video is the longest recording of the event and it pinpoints the entry (a pity that it disappears behind clouds, other I should have been able to follow it almost all the way to the UK). It remains to be seen whether my video confirms or busts the paper. smile





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI


Edited by midtskogen - Friday, 01.01.2016, 09:55
 
Destructor1701Date: Friday, 01.01.2016, 01:28 | Message # 896
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That's amazing, man!

I'm in Ireland - I vaguely recall there being a hubbub about something crossing the sky in '12. I wish I had seen it.





 
WatsisnameDate: Friday, 01.01.2016, 04:47 | Message # 897
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That's a remarkable meteor. Any idea on the feasibility of calculating the change in its orbit by the flyby? Or does it depend too much on unknowns?




 
midtskogenDate: Friday, 01.01.2016, 08:27 | Message # 898
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My 2012 video shows 36 seconds of the path, and I wish I had seen it myself. The 2012 meteor was estimated in the paper to be between 500 - 1000 kg travelling at 12.4 km/s, reaching an altitude of 53 km, then rising to 60 km before dropping again, dropping several kg sized meteorites on its way, and the main body finally splashing down 2847 km away from where it was assumed to be visible first. The magnitude seems to have peaked at about -9. My video should show new insight on the timing, appearance, speed and deceleration.

The meteor this Christmas was fainter (perhaps -5 - -6) and dipped to about 62 km. The software I'm using gives 14.3 km/s as the best estimate, but I suspect it was closer to 13.5 km/s (using intuition to resolve the conflicts in the data instead of the program's view of what a "best fit" is). I think it bounced back into space (but might have dropped some meteorites on its way), and the orbit definitely changed by several degrees. It would be interesting to calculate the possibility that it was captured by Earth and would revisit soon (if it already hasn't), but I think there are many unknowns. Just slight inaccuracies in the estimated speed (< 1 km/s) will have a big impact on the orbit and the timing for a return.

There were many interesting witness reports of the fragmentation. One likened it with the Colombia shuttle breakup.

ADDED: I got some help from Esko Lyytinen and simulations show that fragments between 0.5 - 10 kg (roughly) would get captured and reenter (from 1.5 hours to a few days or even get into a satellite orbit). Any smaller fragments have hit Sweden and Finland. Larger fragments (> 10 kg) should have fully escaped Earth.





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI


Edited by midtskogen - Friday, 01.01.2016, 12:33
 
VilfateDate: Friday, 01.01.2016, 17:51 | Message # 899
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The subject of Space Engine,,, in the form of a high school textbook in China.
smile
The subtitle is Observation and Exploration

Attachments: 8954636.jpg(68Kb)





 
LookAtDatDakkaDate: Sunday, 03.01.2016, 18:49 | Message # 900
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Quote Vilfate ()

The subject of Space Engine,,, in the form of a high school textbook in China.

The subtitle is Observation and Exploration


Can you give us some sample page and translate it?





NVIDIA 960 GTX 2048MB

Edited by LookAtDatDakka - Sunday, 03.01.2016, 18:51
 
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