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Forum » SpaceEngine » Off-topic Discussions » Challenge a Child's IQ (Be brainily brutal and get away with it)
Challenge a Child's IQ
midtskogenDate: Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 12:15 | Message # 16
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Quote (Spyro)
I'm gonna have to say B. But I have seen the moon lots of times in broad daylight...

Yes, but can you seen the full moon set when the sun is high in the sky?

Quote (Spyro)
I know that exponential multiplication grows extremely fast, so, C.



Quote (Spyro)
Tesseract!

Correct!

The answer to my riddle (which has to be pronounced in a thick Scandinavian or German accent) is:





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI


Edited by midtskogen - Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 12:15
 
werdnaforeverDate: Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 14:46 | Message # 17
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Quote (Spyro)
The Megaman glitch level.

Actually, I was thinking of World -1 from Super Mario Bros, a.k.a. the "minus world" (which sounds really creepy if you ask me).

If you can tell me the specific level in megaman (where there are like a million games, which I'm not familiar with myself) then you get it right.

Quote (Spyro)
Stumped.

This one's hard since it's a specific part of a specific movie (which is the only hint I'll give). I want to know if anyone else can get this though...

Harder (a difficulty which is greater than that of "hard"): Organization which exists outside of time and space whose "reality changes" stagnate the progress of civilization.

Medium: The Krell are from what planet?

Easy: The integral of a derivative is equal to:


Edited by werdnaforever - Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 14:48
 
WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 20:51 | Message # 18
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Quote (midtskogen)
Is log2(7×109) closer to 7, 31, 365 or 3650?


I would be surprised if he has been introduced to logs at age 13! smile

Quote
Easy: The integral of a derivative is equal to:

Same with this! This question is only easy if you've learned calculus!

Spyro, you got the first and second questions correct. (Good job!) The full moon is always opposite the sun in the sky, so if the full moon is setting, the sun must be rising. In general that puts the local time at ~6am.
You can indeed see the moon during the day, but as midtskogen hints, you will never see the full moon when the sun is high in the sky. It will be below your horizon.

On the third question you had the right reasoning, but it turns out to be even faster than you thought! You can figure it out by counting how many times you have to multiply 2 by itself to get above 7 billion. With exponential notation:
2x2 = 22 = 4.
2x2x2 = 23 = 8.
2x2x2x2 = 24 = 16.
...
233 = ~8.6 billion. So it takes 33 days, or about one month. Therefore B is the best answer.





 
werdnaforeverDate: Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 21:30 | Message # 19
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Coming up with questions of an appropriate difficulty is... harder than I thought. I feel like I've lost perspective on what was hard for me when I was 13.

Anyway,

1 Easy: The plank epoch lasted until 10^___ seconds after the big bang. No searching!

2 Easy: A very popular search engine's name is based on a number. How do you spell the name of the number?

3 Hard: The mathematician ______ ______'s _ year old nephew invented the number. To get this right you need both of them.

4 Medium: Can a triangle have more than 180 degrees? Yes or no, and if yes then explain under what circumstances.

5 Hard: A train passes by you at a subway. When it approaches, the noise is high pitched, and when it leaves the noise is low pitched. But forget about that; What is the energy of a photon with a wavelength of 400nm, and what color is it?

6 Hard: A man from St. Ives has _ wives.

7 Hard: The _______ manuscript has puzzled linguists for a very long time. They still haven't figured out what the constructed language is, but it resembles medieval languages.

8 Easy: The ___ of the _______ of the ____ of a _____ ________ ______ the ______ of the __________.
 
midtskogenDate: Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 21:44 | Message # 20
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Quote (Watsisname)
I would be surprised if he has been introduced to logs at age 13!

Yes, but he got the tesseract right. Not sure whether I knew logarithms at that age, but I'm pretty sure that I knew that a 32 bit address bus would span out 4 billion addresses, so that one would have been easy. I mostly programmed machine code at that time, writing instructions straight into memory. Until I was 13-14 I was programming the MOS 6502/6510 chips, but then I was introduced to the Motorola 68000 series (with 32 bit capabilities!) and began using an assembler. The youth today! Spoiled brats. They have all kinds of modern tools, such as assemblers, compilers, advanced programming languages, etc. Do they even know what a logic gate is?

Hard puzzle: What does the following C code compute?

Code
int f(int n) {
   int x;
   for (x = 0; n > x; x++) n -= 2*x;
   return x;
}


(Compiling and testing is cheating)

It's an algorithm that I invented while programming the 68000 in my early teens. Not very efficient for large numbers, but could be written in 4 or 5 machine code instructions.





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI


Edited by midtskogen - Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 21:45
 
SpyroDate: Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 22:03 | Message # 21
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This is a lot of questions and I have stuff to do! sad
Anyway, Scores:
Me: 5 You: 6

Please don't do a questions spam, werdna. I didn't know you guys would go so crazy with this. wacko
Quote (midtskogen)
int f(int n) {
int x;
for (x = 0; n > x; x++) n -= 2*x;
return x;
}

I'm horrible at scripting, no thanks.
Me: 5 You: 7

I've never felt so dumb...

Quote (Werdnaforever and Me solving it)
1 Easy: The plank epoch lasted until 10^-12 seconds after the big bang. No searching!

2 Easy: A very popular search engine's name is based on a number. How do you spell the name of the number? Googol

3 Hard: The mathematician ihavenoidea's 9 year old nephew invented the number. To get this right you need both of them.
you got me.

4 Medium: Can a triangle have more than 180 degrees? Yes or no, and if yes then explain under what circumstances.
Yes, when drawing the triangle on a round surface.

5 Hard: A train passes by you at a subway. When it approaches, the noise is high pitched, and when it leaves the noise is low pitched. But forget about that; What is the energy of a photon with a wavelength of 400nm, and what color is it?
1GHz? Red?

6 Hard: A man from St. Ives has _ wives.
GAH

7 Hard: The _______ manuscript has puzzled linguists for a very long time. They still haven't figured out what the constructed language is, but it resembles medieval languages.
dry

Me: 5 You: 10
I have really important stuff to do, and please, don't give me huge amounts of questions.

Quote (Werdnaforever)
8 Easy: The ___ of the _______ of the ____ of a _____ ________ ______ the ______ of the __________.

Please do not abuse the question rankings.





I'm back, but am I here to stay? Hopefully!
 
werdnaforeverDate: Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 22:37 | Message # 22
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Quote (werdnaforever)
8 Easy: The ___ of the _______ of the ____ of a _____ ________ ______ the ______ of the __________.

Quote (Spyro)
Please do not abuse the question rankings.

The sum of the squares of the legs of a right triangle equals the square of the hypotenuse.

I figured you'd either have gone over the Pythagorean theorem by now, or would be going over it. I learned it around your age in school.

EDIT: I'm just going to stop asking questions now...

1 epoch: ends at 10^-43
2 Correct
3 Edward Kasner's nine year old nephew came up with the name googol. Now you know why Gogol sounds like gibberish. It's because it is.
4 correct

5 Was too hard for any 13 year old... . The energy would be 3.1 electron volts. GHz is a measure of the frequency of a wave (how often the wave passes by you in a length of time). Electron volts and Joules are measures of energy. This would be blue- red is up there in the 600-700 nm range.

Just forget about this question. I shouldn't have asked it. sad

6 seven. This is part of a rhyme: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/As_I_was_going_to_St_Ives

7 the voynich manuscript. You can look at it here:
https://archive.org/details/TheVoynichManuscript for a copy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voynich_manuscript
It's pretty cool, and kind of weird.


Edited by werdnaforever - Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 23:19
 
WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 23:11 | Message # 23
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Quote
8 Easy: The ___ of the _______ of the ____ of a _____ ________ ______ the ______ of the __________.


What. mellow

I don't get it, are you testing to see if he understands the Pythagorean Theorem, or if he's unnaturally good at fitting words into blanks without any verbs, nouns, or adjectives to provide clues? I know the theorem but probably would not have solved that in even a lifetime of guessing...

Anyway, folks, please do give Spyro some breathing room. When it's one person answering many people's questions, it can very easily be overwhelming. I hesitated just to post 3 questions before he had answered the previous set (I posted anyway because I was about to go to bed), but this is getting out of hand. So let's all follow the rules laid out in the original post.

Also put some serious thought into whether your questions are really fair or not. We all have different pools of knowledge, and you should consider if you want to test if he is familiar with some piece of knowledge (a trivia question), or if you want to test his use of critical reasoning to find the answer. The difficulty of trivia questions depend on what a person has been exposed to, while critical reasoning questions depend on what skills have been learned. In both cases, consider what would be expected for the age. (Admittedly this is not easy.)

BTW, if I were answering these questions (and omitting my own) then my score would be 10 versus 19.





 
AerospacefagDate: Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 23:28 | Message # 24
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IQ? I don't know about how you associate IQ with the ability to answer the questions, but here's something different: a logic puzzle. People with good education can solve this by remembering school exercises, but it requires math knowledge anyway.

Difficulty: let it be hard.

You have a bag of small metal spheres identical to each other - it is possible to smash them to bits if you hit them hard enough - for example, drop it from 100-story building.

And you have, to say, this one 100 story building. You have to find out minimum floor, falling from which will break the sphere(as mentioned above, spheres are identical, so this height is a constant).

What is the minimum amount of spheres you have to trow out of the window(s) to find this out?


Edited by Aerospacefag - Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 23:30
 
werdnaforeverDate: Tuesday, 03.09.2013, 23:55 | Message # 25
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You have a bag of small metal spheres identical to each other - it is possible to smash them to bits if you hit them hard enough - for example, drop it from 100-story building.

And you have, to say, this one 100 story building. You have to find out minimum floor, falling from which will break the sphere(as mentioned above, spheres are identical, so this height is a constant).

What is the minimum amount of spheres you have to trow out of the window(s) to find this out?

That's an interesting problem. Do the spheres collide with each other inside the bag when the bag hits the ground, and if so would you want it to be a factor?
 
AerospacefagDate: Wednesday, 04.09.2013, 00:14 | Message # 26
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werdnaforever,
 
WatsisnameDate: Wednesday, 04.09.2013, 00:20 | Message # 27
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Aerospacefag: I believe your problem statement requires boundary conditions. I.e. can the critical floor (the floor from which the spheres break when dropped) be the lowest floor? Highest floor? Greater than the highest floor?




 
HarbingerDawnDate: Wednesday, 04.09.2013, 00:29 | Message # 28
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Quote (Watsisname)
I believe your problem statement requires boundary conditions. I.e. can the critical floor (the floor from which the spheres break when dropped) be the lowest floor? Highest floor? Greater than the highest floor?

It doesn't matter if it's greater than, since the problem would simply be unsolvable. However it would be necessary to specify that they will not break if dropped from the lowest floor (i.e. that the breaking point is somewhere on floors 2-100).

It also needs to be specified, I think, whether or not the problem required a methodological solution. That could affect the answer (it would almost certainly be higher than if one were not required).





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AerospacefagDate: Wednesday, 04.09.2013, 00:38 | Message # 29
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Watsisname, I think if you have high enough IQ you can figure it out by yourself.

Therefore, any "loophole abuse" is an "easy mode"(+ 1pt), as the conditions have only purpose of visualization of a problem.

Added (04.09.2013, 03:38)
---------------------------------------------
Quote (HarbingerDawn)
It also needs to be specified, I think, whether or not the problem required a methodological solution. That could affect the answer (it would almost certainly be higher than if one were not required).

I spent several minutes thinking about it.

It is required for "high difficulty", of course, you can't expect to win the game by pure luck.


Edited by Aerospacefag - Wednesday, 04.09.2013, 00:39
 
WatsisnameDate: Wednesday, 04.09.2013, 00:51 | Message # 30
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Quote (Aerospacefag)
Watsisname, I think if you have high enough IQ you can figure it out by yourself.


Yes, but the idea should be to have a problem statement with the least possibility of being misinterpreted. That's why I'm asking. smile

Quote (HarbingerDawn)
It doesn't matter if it's greater than, since the problem would simply be unsolvable.

Unless you give the balls additional velocity by throwing them (and then applying physics). That's definitely not the intended solution method though. tongue





 
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