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Forum » SpaceEngine » Off-topic Discussions » Totally off-topic thread (Talk about anything.)
Totally off-topic thread
WatsisnameDate: Thursday, 06.06.2013, 23:59 | Message # 1351
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Just got back from a nice trip through Colorado. Beautiful country out there.

some photos

What all have I missed around here? smile





 
DisasterpieceDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 01:15 | Message # 1352
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Quote (Watsisname)
What all have I missed around here?

The forum members built the Ark of Perfection and put it into Earth orbit, it can carry 150,000 people and have a sustainable ecosystem that could last 3500 years. It will be used when (hopefully if, but probably not) climate change makes the only probable solution for our survival escape from Earth to a new home.





I play teh spase engien
 
anonymousgamerDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 01:24 | Message # 1353
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Quote (Disasterpiece)
What all have I missed around here?


Space Engine turned sentient and created a virtual civilization on virtual Mars that currently are threatening to destroy virtual Earth.





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WatsisnameDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 01:47 | Message # 1354
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Hmmm. Basis of the backstory for when Space Engine becomes a game? tongue

Added (07.06.2013, 04:47)
---------------------------------------------

Quote (HarbingerDawn)
Quote (Spyro)
we can kill all traces of life in the span of 300 years!

Incorrect. There is virtually nothing that humanity can do to kill all life on Earth, nor is that (or even a devastating extinction event) a realistic consequence of anthropogenic climate change.


Yup! Not only will anthropogenic climate change not kill all life on Earth, but we couldn't kill all life even if we detonated our entire stockpile of nuclear weapons at once. smile

Life on Earth's surface will probably continue for another 1 to 3 billion years. (Climate feedback effects due to the Sun's gradually increasing luminosity are expected to render the surface uninhabitable well before the Sun actually goes Red Giant, but even then it's still a loooong way off.)





 
Joey_PenguinDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 01:50 | Message # 1355
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We're starting to get too on topic, so Artichoke Tomato Oranges.

EDIT: Also,





Careful. The PLATT Collective has spurs.

Edited by Joey_Penguin - Friday, 07.06.2013, 02:47
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 05:18 | Message # 1356
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Quote (anonymousgamer)
Space Engine turned sentient and created a virtual civilization on virtual Mars that currently are threatening to destroy virtual Earth.

biggrin biggrin

Watsisname, woot you're back! Your presence was missed.





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Edited by HarbingerDawn - Friday, 07.06.2013, 05:20
 
midtskogenDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 12:10 | Message # 1357
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It would take serious terraforming to wipe out all life on Earth. The best shot would be to have all oceans evaporate and vent out most of the atmosphere, which probably is very very hard. Life is pretty hard to get rid of once it has a foothold. Which is precisely why I think it's likely that Mars is sterile and always has been.




NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 12:27 | Message # 1358
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Quote (midtskogen)
Which is precisely why I think it's likely that Mars is sterile and always has been.

Why do you think Mars is sterile? We have no solid evidence that it doesn't have life, and some interesting evidence suggesting that it does. In either case we don't have nearly enough data to even cast a preliminary judgment on. All we know so far is that Mars was once capable of supporting life and we have no reason to believe that life did not arise there, nor any particular reason to believe that it did. I don't think an opinion in either direction is justifiable.





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Billy_MayesDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 12:36 | Message # 1359
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My better computer is being fixed and I have to use the reeeaaally slow one. Can't play SE. cry




AMD Phenom II X4 955 3.2 GHz Quad-Core - AMD Radeon HD 6950 2GB VRAM - 4GB RAM - 1680x1050 75 Hz Samsung screen
 
midtskogenDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 13:21 | Message # 1360
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
some interesting evidence suggesting that it does

What evidence is that? Methane being released into the atmosphere?

Let me rephrase. I think that if life did appear on Mars, there's still life there because of what I stated. And as for the possibility that there is life there now, it's something that we can't realistically ever rule out, it can be hard to find keeping in mind that life on Earth was fairly invisible for most of its existence, but Mars looks pretty dead, less promising than 40 years ago. Mars certainly was the first place to look for life, though, but I wonder if money now is better spent elsewhere (Europa, even Venus for proximity reasons).





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI


Edited by midtskogen - Friday, 07.06.2013, 13:31
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 14:32 | Message # 1361
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Quote (midtskogen)
Mars certainly was the first place to look for life, though, but I wonder if money now is better spent elsewhere (Europa, even Venus for proximity reasons).

I hope you don't mean you think we should look for life on Venus. If there's any place where we would be justified in assuming a lack of life, it's there. Europa might be a better place to search for life than Mars, but exploration of Europa is not nearly as cost-effective as exploration of Mars, and is largely impractical without further development and maturation of numerous technologies and facets of the aerospace industry.

I very much want humanity to explore Europa, and any other world it can reach too. Anywhere we can go is a place we should explore. Unfortunately for the foreseeable future our exploration options are very limited and we can not go to most of the places that we want to. Hopefully this will change within a few decades.

Quote (midtskogen)
What evidence is that? Methane being released into the atmosphere?

Actually my assertion of such evidence was based mostly on ignorance on the results of a particular experiment, so I retract it. But the methane could be biological in origin, and the ambiguous results of the Viking biological experiments did not rule out biology at the Viking landing sites.

However, I think that if life does exist on Mars then it is likely to be below the surface rather than on or near it, so I would not expect the Viking experiments to have actually detected life.

Quote (midtskogen)
I think that if life did appear on Mars, there's still life there because of what I stated.

I agree.





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Edited by HarbingerDawn - Friday, 07.06.2013, 14:35
 
Fireinthehole-Date: Friday, 07.06.2013, 14:47 | Message # 1362
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I'm trying to play "In the Hall of the Mountain King" on my piano, it goes pretty well, but I find it very difficult playing with two hands. tongue




Love Space Engine!
 
VoekoevakaDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 15:21 | Message # 1363
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Hey !

A long time ago, I have made this game, which can be considered as the strangest game of the world.

The aim is simple, you choose a game mode, and you start as a red star in the sky. You have to touch the other white stars using the arrows keys, then these stars will become yours (and will be controlled bi AI). You can destroy an ennemy star (blue, green or orange) by touching it, but you have to be brighter.

You'll notices that white stars have strange powers, shooting stars can change their direction, and the moon can divide itself in two smaller moons.

Warning : a lot of objects are dangerous : if you touch shooting stars, flames (the strange orange balls), explosions of stars, thunder, red planets, you are dead.

Some objects are benefic : blue, green and white planets. Some moons are controlable. You can become an absolute star if you gather the good planets. You can also breed flowers pots on the main menu !

Some screenshots :



You want to test ?

Attachments: 3733142.png(24Kb)





Want some music of mine ? Please go here !

 
midtskogenDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 16:29 | Message # 1364
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Quote (Voekoevaka)
I hope you don't mean you think we should look for life on Venus.

I do, though I mean it in a somewhat deliberately provocative way. My point is: Suppose you've lost something, and it could have been lost in a number of places, more than you can quickly cover, so you need to prioritise where to look. You might want to put some improbable places fairly high on the list if they're relatively easily accessible. You shouldn't search the originally most probably place to death, and you should try some improbable places before some more probable ones if you can cover more ground that way.

We have so much to explore that I don't think the search for life should be a primary objective anywhere unless we have really compelling evidence. But let's still try to cover most of the solar system, including the gas giants themselves, but then I'd point to a "gas dwarf" in our neighbourhood first.

Venus fascinates me. It has an extreme environment, an immensely hot atmosphere so dense that it at some point stops being a gas and become a supercritical fluid instead (itself pretty fascinating), but I find it intriguing that the gravity is roughly the same as that of Earth, and that the temperature is comfortable to humans roughly in the 1000 hPa altitude. And it's a short way from Earth. Could we possibly do interesting things there if we think somewhat untraditionally (forget about rovers)?

Quote (HarbingerDawn)
But the methane could be biological in origin

Yes, the methane is an observation worth following up, though it could have several explanations. Much cited also is the watery past, but I wouldn't call that evidence for life at all, at most evidence for life not being inconceivable.





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Friday, 07.06.2013, 18:46 | Message # 1365
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Quote (midtskogen)
You might want to put some improbable places fairly high on the list if they're relatively easily accessible.

The surface of Venus is one of the least accessible places in the Solar system. As for orbiters, we've sent many there over the years, and there's one active there right now. We've also sent balloons into the atmosphere. So it's not like we've ignored it.

Venus may be an interesting place, but I don't see any compelling reason to choose it over other targets that are simultaneously more interesting and less explored.

Quote (midtskogen)
find it intriguing that the gravity is roughly the same as that of Earth, and that the temperature is comfortable to humans roughly in the 1000 hPa altitude.

The atmospheric composition and violent winds make it a very inhospitable place, even if the pressure and temperature are nominally tolerable.

Venus is an unlikely location for life, and an impractical destination for human exploration. Aside from that, we already have good data on the planet's atmosphere, terrain, and interior, and until robotic surface exploration becomes truly possible there is little that one more orbital mission and several atmosphere probes could not tell us.

I don't see a good case for making Venus a high priority target for exploration.





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