RUS New site

Advanced search

[ New messages · Forum rules · Members ]
Page 28 of 231«122627282930230231»
Forum » SpaceEngine » Off-topic Discussions » Totally off-topic thread (Talk about anything.)
Totally off-topic thread
TimDate: Thursday, 24.01.2013, 17:32 | Message # 406
Explorer
Group: Users
Belgium
Messages: 296
Status: Offline
They obviously have no idea on how to measure these things. That way, their calculations prove nothing and the world could in fact becoming colder! Silly scientists, besides, God won't let us change his kingdom like that.
 
midtskogenDate: Thursday, 24.01.2013, 18:49 | Message # 407
Star Engineer
Group: Users
Norway
Messages: 1673
Status: Offline
Actually, isn't NASA playing the strawman card here? To be fair, it's hard to find anyone who would say there has been no warming over the past century (but some will claim that it's too hard to measure). The argument is rather that there is some disagreement in what the temperature will be and the certainty. After all, a ±0.5C fluctuation for which there is good evidence is little to worry about. The question is, will there be much larger changes. The estimates vary.




NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
DoctorOfSpaceDate: Thursday, 24.01.2013, 21:31 | Message # 408
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
Pirate
Messages: 3600
Status: Offline


I think you have a problem if your pizza is bigger than you, I also think that problem is even worse if you are morbidly obese.





Intel Core i7-5820K 4.2GHz 6-Core Processor
G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory
EVGA GTX 980 Ti SC 6GB
 
werdnaforeverDate: Thursday, 24.01.2013, 21:46 | Message # 409
World Builder
Group: Users
Pirate
Messages: 897
Status: Offline
Quote (DoctorOfSpace)
(picture of obese people)

Is their gravity noticeable? What fraction of a meter per second do you think it is? Is it comparable to a small asteroid?

EDIT: Okay, maybe that was a little to harsh. That said, at the rate we're going, it's not going to be long before people start flying towards each other involuntarily.


Edited by werdnaforever - Thursday, 24.01.2013, 21:49
 
SpyroDate: Thursday, 24.01.2013, 21:53 | Message # 410
Explorer
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 162
Status: Offline
Quote
Is their gravity noticeable? What fraction of a meter per second do you think it is? Is it comparable to a small asteroid?

EDIT: Okay, maybe that was a little to harsh. That said, at the rate we're going, it's not going to be long before people start flying towards each other involuntarily


Hopefully not. [The image in my mind is kinda funny though wink ]





I'm back, but am I here to stay? Hopefully!
 
WatsisnameDate: Thursday, 24.01.2013, 21:57 | Message # 411
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 2611
Status: Offline
Quote (midtskogen)
The argument is rather that there is some disagreement in what the temperature will be and the certainty. After all, a ±0.5C fluctuation for which there is good evidence is little to worry about. The question is, will there be much larger changes. The estimates vary.


The estimates vary depending on what emission scenario you use -- higher emissions lead to higher temperatures, obviously. The other uncertainty stems from the Climate Sensitivity, which is how much the temperature increases for a doubling of CO2. Directly from atmospheric physics, a doubling of CO2 causes about a 1.5°C increase. Feedback effects increase this further, and the total uncertainty range is from ~2°C to ~7°C. Paleoclimate data indicates the best fit is ~3°C, which is in excellent agreement with IPCC figures. Note that the safest maximum increase in planetary temperature according to atmospheric and paleoclimate scientists is ~2°C. Also note that all likely emission scenarios bring us above that threshold, and our current track roughly matches the high emission scenario.

In short, our current path is one that will lead to very significant warming with very significant results, and this is not uncertain.







Edited by Watsisname - Thursday, 24.01.2013, 22:00
 
DoctorOfSpaceDate: Thursday, 24.01.2013, 22:01 | Message # 412
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
Pirate
Messages: 3600
Status: Offline
Quote (werdnaforever)
at the rate we're going






Intel Core i7-5820K 4.2GHz 6-Core Processor
G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory
EVGA GTX 980 Ti SC 6GB
 
anonymousgamerDate: Thursday, 24.01.2013, 22:23 | Message # 413
World Builder
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 1011
Status: Offline
Quote (DoctorOfSpace)
(Wall-E video)


You mean to tell me people 700 years from now have legs?!





Desktop: FX-8350 4.0 GHz, 8 GB DDR3 RAM, EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 FTW 8 GB, 2 TB HDD, 24 inch 1920x1080 screen
Laptop: Core i5 480M 2.66 GHz (turbo 2.93), 8 GB DDR3 RAM, AMD Radeon HD 6550m 1 GB, 640 GB HDD, 17.3 inch 1600x900 screen
 
werdnaforeverDate: Thursday, 24.01.2013, 22:26 | Message # 414
World Builder
Group: Users
Pirate
Messages: 897
Status: Offline
A book relating to all this is The Science Fiction Weight-loss Book.
 
midtskogenDate: Thursday, 24.01.2013, 22:37 | Message # 415
Star Engineer
Group: Users
Norway
Messages: 1673
Status: Offline
Quote (Watsisname)
and the total uncertainty range is from ~2°C to ~7°C

And that's my point. Not much agreement there. My take on this is that some of them will be right, but not for the quite right reasons because feedback is complex stuff. The right reasons might not matter in politics, but in science they do.





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Thursday, 24.01.2013, 22:49 | Message # 416
Cosmic Curator
Group: Administrators
United States
Messages: 8714
Status: Offline
Quote (midtskogen)
Not much agreement there.

They might disagree on the specifics, but they agree on the general forecast, which is significant warming (this is the part that people are disputing when they say "scientists don't agree").

Quote (midtskogen)
but not for the quite right reasons because feedback is complex stuff

We actually have a better grasp on the feedback effects than many people realize, though there are of course many uncertainties especially when forecasting. The best data we have for feedback effects shows a net warming effect from feedbacks, and it seems more likely than not that that will hold true for the foreseeable future.





All forum users, please read this!
My SE mods and addons
Phenom II X6 1090T 3.2 GHz, 16 GB DDR3 RAM, GTX 970 3584 MB VRAM
 
midtskogenDate: Friday, 25.01.2013, 06:55 | Message # 417
Star Engineer
Group: Users
Norway
Messages: 1673
Status: Offline
Quote (HarbingerDawn)
The best data we have for feedback effects shows a net warming effect from feedbacks, and it seems more likely than not that that will hold true for the foreseeable future.

If the feedback does not amplify the CO2 warming, the warming for a doubling of CO2 will be about 1 °C. This is not disputed. The question is the amount of net positive feedback, and the amplitude of unrelated natural variability.

My impression is that climate scientists currently themselves express most frustration in nailing the cloud feedback. Regarding natural variability many astrophysicists insist that there is a strong link between solar activity and cloud/temperature, and whether observational data support the magnitude of this is highly disputed. There is also some uncertainty whether periods known from history to be cold or warm were local or global events.





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
expandoDate: Friday, 25.01.2013, 09:13 | Message # 418
Space Pilot
Group: Users
Australia
Messages: 87
Status: Offline
My Dog


Attachments: 9035648.jpg(236Kb)





"Religion is regarded by the common people as true - by the wise as false - and by the rulers as useful."
Lucius Annaeus Seneca
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Friday, 25.01.2013, 17:21 | Message # 419
Cosmic Curator
Group: Administrators
United States
Messages: 8714
Status: Offline
Star Wars now that J.J. Abrams is at the helm dry






All forum users, please read this!
My SE mods and addons
Phenom II X6 1090T 3.2 GHz, 16 GB DDR3 RAM, GTX 970 3584 MB VRAM


Edited by HarbingerDawn - Friday, 25.01.2013, 17:21
 
midtskogenDate: Friday, 25.01.2013, 21:22 | Message # 420
Star Engineer
Group: Users
Norway
Messages: 1673
Status: Offline
The full moon is approaching. Bad for star gazing, but very good for cross country skiing. I went out with my 5 year old daughter this evening.

Pretty hazy. A slight halo around the moon. The Pleiades a few degrees off Jupiter were barely visible.

Inversion and -18 °C in lower elevations, while it was more comfortable at -11 °C uphill.

Attachments: 4609359.jpg(94Kb) · 4357069.jpg(78Kb) · 6722245.jpg(128Kb)





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
Forum » SpaceEngine » Off-topic Discussions » Totally off-topic thread (Talk about anything.)
Page 28 of 231«122627282930230231»
Search: