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Forum » SpaceEngine » Off-topic Discussions » Space Stuff Collection (Post here any random space stuff you want to share)
Space Stuff Collection
HarbingerDawnDate: Monday, 25.03.2013, 00:12 | Message # 121
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Sunglint on irrigation canals in Mexico






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SolarisDate: Saturday, 30.03.2013, 02:20 | Message # 122
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Eclipse of the sun from the Clementine mission to the moon in January of 1994. Venus shining brightly cool
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Monday, 01.04.2013, 23:54 | Message # 123
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New York City






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anonymousgamerDate: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 00:07 | Message # 124
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New York City


I wonder if anyone there has ever seen a star





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HarbingerDawnDate: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 00:33 | Message # 125
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Quote (anonymousgamer)
I wonder if anyone there has ever seen a star

I wonder how many people there have even heard of a star.

It's also interesting to note that three of the most prominent American science popularizers of all time came from that very city: Richard Feynman (Queens), Carl Sagan (Brooklyn), and Neil deGrasse Tyson (the Bronx).





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NovaSiliskoDate: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 01:30 | Message # 126
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May not be a coincidence... imagine going from NYC to, say, new mexico, and going from the most light polluted to the clearest skies on earth. It would be absolutely astounding.
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 02:27 | Message # 127
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Quote (NovaSilisko)
May not be a coincidence... imagine going from NYC to, say, new mexico, and going from the most light polluted to the clearest skies on earth.

I know that very thing inspired Neil deGrasse Tyson, but Carl Sagan mentioned being able to see stars from New York when he was little, and if he could then Feynman certainly would have been able to. Sagan mentioned the stars as being a source of wonder for him as a child, so it seems that the stars themselves are the lowest common denominator in this case. Where there be stars, there be inspiration smile





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TimDate: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 10:59 | Message # 128
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Tou can see stars from largely polluted area's, just few and it has to be a clear night. From Belgium, I can usually see Ursa Major fairly easy sometimes. But at this time of the year, nights are dark and clouded and you're lucky to see the Moon when she's out there.
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 11:58 | Message # 129
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Quote (Tim)
From Belgium, I can usually see Ursa Major fairly easy sometimes.

In extremely light polluted places (like New York) even Ursa Major is invisible. Where I used to live did not have as much light pollution as NYC, yet I could still barely see Ursa Major. In the summer not more than a dozen stars were visible. In the winter it was closer to 3 dozen, but still very few. From a city like New York I expect you could see Sirius, Capella, Vega, and the main stars of Orion, but I wouldn't expect too much more than that.





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midtskogenDate: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 12:12 | Message # 130
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
In the summer not more than a dozen stars were visible.

Same thing here even far from cities. That stupid light polluting sun! tongue





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HarbingerDawnDate: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 12:27 | Message # 131
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Same thing here even far from cities. That stupid light polluting sun!

heh well I don't live near the arctic so I don't have that problem





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midtskogenDate: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 12:40 | Message # 132
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One could perhaps believe that winter makes that up, but I believe that the closer to the pole you are, the more yearly accumulated twilight you get, so, on average, the north and south poles might be the most light polluted spots on earth, contrary to what one perhaps would first think.

I haven't done the math, though, but it seems right. Of course, the poles will beat NYC in number of hours per year with limiting magnitude above some relatively high number. But perhaps not for average limiting magnitude.





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WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 12:47 | Message # 133
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Here's a light pollution map of my state. I'm in that white blob next to Washington DC. sad


I can still see a good number of stars though, probably up to magnitude 4 or 4.5. I can even see M42 with direct vision. And the Milky Way is about a 30 minute drive away.





 
HarbingerDawnDate: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 13:18 | Message # 134
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Quote Watsisname
Here's a light pollution map of my state

A little bit different and higher resolution image smile



I think it's amazing just how distinct the I-81 corridor is (that is I-81, right?)





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Edited by HarbingerDawn - Wednesday, 15.10.2014, 13:14
 
midtskogenDate: Tuesday, 02.04.2013, 13:21 | Message # 135
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Snow cover might distort the picture somewhat. As a rule of thumb, at least here in the Oslo area with (if generous) about 1 million inhabitants, naked eye limiting magnitude drops by about a magnitude when there is snow cover. It's effect is definitely strongest when all roads have snow, but city roads are less frequently covered by snow than rural roads.

I'm a bit worried that light pollution might soon skyrocket as I think we're about to see a big change in technology moving from sodium lamps to LED. Most LED's emit a much wider spectrum, in particular they emit much more blue light which until recently has been a relatively unspoiled part of the spectrum. The advantages of LED are no warm-up time, higher efficiency and better colour rendering. The light pollution is much worse than what we have. But nobody cares about that. It should perhaps rather be argued that the bluer light from LED ruins the night vision, which can be dangerous where illumination ends. Also, white light is really bad in thick fog and greatly reduces visibility compared to more monochromatic light. On the other hand, the lack of warm-up time for LED's should make it practical to switch off road lights automatically when there's little or no traffic, which will be good. What we need for roads is really near monochromatic LED's in the red end.





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