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Forum » SpaceEngine » Off-topic Discussions » Space Stuff Collection (Post here any random space stuff you want to share)
Space Stuff Collection
PanMDate: Thursday, 04.08.2016, 09:43 | Message # 331
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Wow
 
BananaDate: Thursday, 18.08.2016, 21:47 | Message # 332
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A while ago I heard about white holes. Apparently they are hypothetical reverse black holes. Instead of taking in matter, it spews it out. Unfortunately, they are not possible in our universe, but they are still interesting.




Hello.
 
HornblowerDate: Thursday, 18.08.2016, 21:54 | Message # 333
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Quote Banana ()
Unfortunately, they are not possible in our universe, but they are still interesting

They could still be possible, we just haven't found any yet, just like how people thought black holes were just SciFi
 
BananaDate: Thursday, 18.08.2016, 22:53 | Message # 334
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They may exist in our universe, but it is rather unlikely because white holes are speculated to decrease entropy and therefore break the laws of thermodynamics. However, if the multiverse exists, white holes may appear in universes which do not follow these rules.




Hello.
 
WatsisnameDate: Friday, 19.08.2016, 00:56 | Message # 335
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Quote Hornblower ()
They could still be possible, we just haven't found any yet, just like how people thought black holes were just SciFi


They are not in the same range of possibility. Black holes are not fundamentally impossible because they can be made from matter if it collapses enough. It was initially hard to believe that sufficient collapse could occur in nature, but we eventually discovered that it does.

But there is no process for creating a white hole. You can't make one from a distribution of matter or energy. It has to be an initial condition of the space-time.





 
BananaDate: Friday, 19.08.2016, 01:35 | Message # 336
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We are not actually certain about the formation of white holes. There is some speculation that black holes transform into white holes at the end of their lifespans, but this is not proven. Currently white holes are completely theoretical and shrouded in mystery. Black holes, on the other hand, are rather common, and quite a bit of information is available on them.




Hello.

Edited by Banana - Friday, 19.08.2016, 01:37
 
WatsisnameDate: Friday, 19.08.2016, 02:32 | Message # 337
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Quote Banana ()
There is some speculation that black holes transform into white holes at the end of their lifespans, but this is not proven.


Wat. I've never heard this, do you know of a paper offhand?

Added: Oh, found it. According to a model in quantum gravity. Weird!





 
MangoJuiceDate: Monday, 12.09.2016, 07:00 | Message # 338
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New mars pics!





More here
 
AerospacefagDate: Monday, 19.09.2016, 22:05 | Message # 339
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Not really sure where to put this new video.



It does show that it is possible to simulate galaxy pretty accurate, but it seems to be a task so complex that no ordinary computer can handle at any rate.



http://www.popularmechanics.com/space....-galaxy

Quote
A group of astronomers led by the California Institute of Technology have created the most accurate model of the Milky Way's formation ever produced. By using a network of 2,000 computers running in parallel, the research team was able to accurately simulate the process by which pockets of gas and dust coalesced into our galaxy, starting just moments after the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago and ending with today's galaxy.
 
DoctorOfSpaceDate: Tuesday, 20.09.2016, 00:22 | Message # 340
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Maybe in another 10 years if Thz computing becomes standard.




Intel Core i7-5820K 4.2GHz 6-Core Processor
G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory
EVGA GTX 980 Ti SC 6GB
 
SolarisDate: Friday, 07.10.2016, 21:52 | Message # 341
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Protostar's light echo ! surprised

More infos
 
WatsisnameDate: Friday, 07.10.2016, 23:45 | Message # 342
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Whoa. surprised




 
Destructor1701Date: Saturday, 08.10.2016, 03:26 | Message # 343
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That is so damn COOL!

I need to know the background of this research, but I'm loving how the interstellar dust is being illuminated. Mind-blowing!





 
FastFourierTransformDate: Saturday, 08.10.2016, 10:39 | Message # 344
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OMG Solaris

The feeling of light scanning the 30 light years structure is mind bogling
 
midtskogenDate: Saturday, 26.11.2016, 07:18 | Message # 345
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I received several questions yesterday about a possible large meteor seen from Northern Norway, but it seems to be a rocket launch instead. I published something on our website (use Google translate). Observers say it exploded. Hard to judge from the picture. Perhaps it just was a first stage separations. I haven't found this launch announced anywhere, but the Russians might not bother. Surely this must be of Russian origin. The photo was taken from 70.7N 23.7E towards ESE.




NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
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