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Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Circumbinary
Circumbinary
OrbitalResonanceDate: Wednesday, 29.08.2012, 03:40 | Message # 1
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Kepler has confirmed another close binary system with planets around it called Kepler 47. This time its multiplanetary. The first planet is only 3 times the size of earth, though hotter like Mercury since its closer in. The second is Neptune sized.



http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120828190127.htm





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DoctorOfSpaceDate: Wednesday, 29.08.2012, 04:13 | Message # 2
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I am really hoping the next planet is an Earth like one. sad


Kepler hasn't disappointed though, love these findings.





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Edited by DoctorOfSpace - Wednesday, 29.08.2012, 04:18
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Wednesday, 29.08.2012, 04:56 | Message # 3
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Quote (DoctorOfSpace)
the circumstances to Earth forming all seem highly unlikely and "lucky".

In what way? The Earth formed in the same way that most planets do as far as we can tell, and even the collision event that formed the Moon is now known to be a not-so-uncommon event in other forming systems. I see no reason why the Earth's formation should be regarded as exceptional. Sure, the odds of a truly Earth-like world existing around any particular star are remote, but there are billions of stars, and I think that the odds of us finding a planet like Earth within the next 20 years are very good.





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DoctorOfSpaceDate: Wednesday, 29.08.2012, 06:05 | Message # 4
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
within the next 20 years are very good.


Which is why I said
Quote (DoctorOfSpace)
I suspect we won't find an Earth like planet for some time


Quote (HarbingerDawn)
even the collision event that formed the Moon is now known to be a not-so-uncommon event in other forming systems.


Has to hit pretty specifically. I'm not saying it is out of the question just seems rare, but I guess on universal, and even galactic, terms rare is common enough.

Quote (HarbingerDawn)
I see no reason why the Earth's formation should be regarded as exceptional.


I'm sure plenty of rocky worlds will be found. I meant in regards to finding one like Earth in regards to the atmospheric composition and size. Basically a second Earth, even one larger would be a lucky find. Our atmosphere is the way it is because life exists, so if we find a planet with similar composition then that is a flag for life which is what I meant when I doubt we will find one for some time.





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HarbingerDawnDate: Wednesday, 29.08.2012, 06:24 | Message # 5
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Quote (DoctorOfSpace)
I meant in regards to finding one like Earth in regards to the atmospheric composition and size

As you said, Earth's atmosphere exists as it does because of life, so that makes it much less likely, and more difficult to gauge the odds on since we don't even know how common life might be. It may take a long time since even if we find such a world it would not be easy to determine its atmospheric composition.

Quote (DoctorOfSpace)
Has to hit pretty specifically. I'm not saying it is out of the question just seems rare, but I guess on universal, and even galactic, terms rare is common enough.

Given the number of such collisions that probably happen in the formation of even a single system (Mars's moons may have also accreted from impact ejecta, and other colossal impacts are known or suspected to have occurred elsewhere) then I don't think it's all that unlikely. As long as the impact is not a head-on collision then it will probably allow for the formation of satellites.





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TalismanDate: Wednesday, 29.08.2012, 06:35 | Message # 6
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Mmm Kepler-47c surely has some juicy habitable moons. cool




 
HarbingerDawnDate: Wednesday, 29.08.2012, 08:25 | Message # 7
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[Discussion on the frequency of life and intelligence moved to here]




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apenpaapDate: Wednesday, 29.08.2012, 11:04 | Message # 8
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The problem I see with the possibility of habitable moons around Kepler-47 is that they would likely be much smaller than Earth, if our own Solar System is anything to go by. With the exception of Moon and Triton, which are thought to be special cases (Moon having been caused by a collision that was just right and Triton having been caught from the Kuiper Belt, something its orbit would also have to be just right for), it seems that under normal moon forming processes:
Terrestrial planets don't form moons, or only very tiny ones.
Ice giants form medium-sized moons of about 1000 km.
And only gas giants form moons the size of Mercury.
So by that logic, things heavier than Mars will probably form only around 2+ Jupiter mass gas giants. Of course, this needn't be true, as it's based on only six planets. And the presence of two anomalous moons created by different methods suggests this is somewhat common too, meaning Kepler-47 c could have captured an Earth-mass planet. It does seem to make it less likely, though.





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