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Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Astrophotography (Post your astrophotos here)
Astrophotography
midtskogenDate: Saturday, 11.10.2014, 07:10 | Message # 391
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Quote Watsisname ()
Whatever you choose to do, I hope you get to see it!

Thanks. I've checked the statistics, and there is a 50% chance of clear sky in Longyearbyen in March, which is pretty good. Certainly the best odds for the whole eclipse path.

During the 1999 eclipse, I missed much of the partial phase while driving because we were chasing the cracks in the cloud cover, and much of the totality (which was mostly obscured) was lost trying to get decent shots. During totality you want to have to mind the filter, try different exposures, change lens. It's pretty stressful. And if it's cold, doing these things fast doesn't work. During this eclipse at 78N in March the weather can be anything from calm and a few degrees above freezing to -30C and 25 m/s winds which blow your tripod over if you leave it unattended for a second.

So this time I'll perhaps just stick to one place to watch it from and forget about mobility. It would be nice not to bring a tonne of cameras, tripods and lenses, and not the rifle either which would be needed if I chase the sun outside town. Somebody else's photos will be better anyway. smile

Added (11.10.2014, 06:10)
---------------------------------------------
I captured a 4s meteor last night:

Video





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI


Edited by midtskogen - Saturday, 11.10.2014, 17:05
 
WatsisnameDate: Thursday, 23.10.2014, 23:40 | Message # 392
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Half a lunar cycle later, now we have a partial solar eclipse:




Got really lucky with the weather -- partly cloudy skies today after having rain every day for about two weeks, and more rain starting tomorrow.





 
Chris94Date: Monday, 27.10.2014, 08:15 | Message # 393
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Took this image of the Moon on October 6th with a binocular, just a day before the lunar eclipse. The lunar eclipse wasn't visible from where i live.


Edited by Chris94 - Monday, 27.10.2014, 08:15
 
midtskogenDate: Wednesday, 05.11.2014, 09:10 | Message # 394
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I photographed two fireballs last night. The second (mostly obscured by clouds) is a Taurid. Taurids are not frequent, but they often produce wonderful fireballs.




Video





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI


Edited by midtskogen - Wednesday, 05.11.2014, 09:11
 
WatsisnameDate: Monday, 24.11.2014, 10:27 | Message # 395
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Got a lucky clear sky and so did some more Milky Way photography to work on my post processing techniques. Am liking the result:



Eight 20s shots, same equipment and location as usual.





 
FireintheholeDate: Monday, 24.11.2014, 11:13 | Message # 396
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Watsisname, outstanding shot! smile




Love SpaceEngine!
 
Tofaute3344Date: Wednesday, 03.12.2014, 14:15 | Message # 397
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Hello Community,

this is my Astrophoto of NGC 6992, a supernova Remnant. I took the Picture trough an 150/750mm Newtonian telescope on an equatorial Mount. The camera i used was an ATIK 383L+ with monochrome sensor. I used a Narrowband Technique with two channels, first was H-alpha (hygrogen light) second was OIII(Oxygen light). to create a colour image i used the Bicolor Technique described by Cannistra.

Hope you like it!
 
Tofaute3344Date: Wednesday, 03.12.2014, 14:23 | Message # 398
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Hello ,

this is my picture of NGC 6992 a supernova remnant. I used a narrowband technique to combine the cameras data, it is almost the same technique as hubble uses. The camera was an ATIK 383L+ with monochrome sensor. Overall exposure time about 6-7 hours, in subframes to 10 minutes each. telescope was an 150/750 newtonian telescope on an equatorial mount.

Hope you like it

Attachments: 8009139.jpg(193Kb)
 
Rhysy27Date: Wednesday, 03.12.2014, 15:55 | Message # 399
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Down here in Cornwall there is an old, abandoned airfield that was once used during WW2. Lots of old buildings scattered around as well as great views of the night sky!










"It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring." - Carl Sagan
 
FireintheholeDate: Wednesday, 03.12.2014, 19:47 | Message # 400
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Quote Rhysy27 ()
Down here in Cornwall there is an old, abandoned airfield that was once used during WW2. Lots of old buildings scattered around as well as great views of the night sky!

Incredible shots! I myself lived near an old WWII airfield. Stargazing from there was simply perfect, since there were no trees and the nearest city was many kilometres away. smile





Love SpaceEngine!
 
midtskogenDate: Wednesday, 03.12.2014, 19:49 | Message # 401
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Wow! Did you have to do any processing to get rid of the light pollution?




NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
Rhysy27Date: Wednesday, 03.12.2014, 22:02 | Message # 402
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Quote Fireinthehole ()
Incredible shots! I myself lived near an old WWII airfield. Stargazing from there was simply perfect, since there were no trees and the nearest city was many kilometres away.

That sounds quite good to shoot from! There are 1 or 2 towns near this one though they don't pose any threat of light pollution. The only negative thing is that there is a dairy farm (can just see the glow at the bottom of the last picture) next to the entrance that has lights constantly on sad

Quote midtskogen ()
Wow! Did you have to do any processing to get rid of the light pollution?

The only processing I did was minor things such as playing around with the brightness and contrast. I think I tried touching up on the white balance a little bit too.





"It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring." - Carl Sagan
 
midtskogenDate: Monday, 08.12.2014, 05:59 | Message # 403
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A nice meteor this morning:

Meteor 2014-12-08 02:14:16UTC





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
WatsisnameDate: Monday, 08.12.2014, 10:03 | Message # 404
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Very nice (and the earlier ones, too). By the way, I was wondering how do these events play into your meteor monitoring network. (Did any other cameras capture these events as well, and do they have your improved coordinate mapping? Or is that still work in progress?) Even if clearly not a stone dropping event, it'd be great to trace trajectories. smile




 
midtskogenDate: Monday, 08.12.2014, 18:45 | Message # 405
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That meteor was observed by one other camera, about 40 south of me:

(Credit: Arne Danielsen)

There isn't really a proper network, just some scattered cameras and little automation. I.e. we have to exchange pictures by e-mail. And coordinates have to be looked up manually. As can be seen in the allsky image, the resolution is very low. I haven't had time measure az/alt for it, the closest reference is Jupiter, and the accuracy will be hardly better than a couple of degrees. I haven't time to figure out the coordinates right now.

By this time next year we hopefully have several cameras like mine, and coordinate mappings are found automatically and a preliminary trajectory would be computed within a few minutes of the event. Interesting events would of course be checked manually to improve accuracy, and we would still have to get weather information manually and then run dark flight simulations.

I now have three 5MP cameras in operation which cover nearly all of my visible sky (4 cameras are required to cover the entire sky if you have a perfect horizon). These are expensive (nearly $1000 each including heated housing), so it's a good thing that we can go from no money (e.g. own pockets) to an actual budget.





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
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