Русский New site

Advanced search

[ New messages · Forum rules · Members ]
Page 26 of 41«1224252627284041»
Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Astrophotography (Post your astrophotos here)
Astrophotography
HarbingerDawnDate: Saturday, 20.09.2014, 22:32 | Message # 376
Cosmic Curator
Group: Administrators
United States
Messages: 8714
Status: Offline
Wow yeah, yours is only very slightly darker. I'll have to go out sometime and see what I can do smile




All forum users, please read this!
My SE mods and addons
Phenom II X6 1090T 3.2 GHz, 16 GB DDR3 RAM, GTX 970 3584 MB VRAM
 
midtskogenDate: Sunday, 21.09.2014, 12:58 | Message # 377
Star Engineer
Group: Users
Norway
Messages: 1671
Status: Offline
Quote Stargate38 ()
Also, What are those black boxes? Are there vehicles there that you (or your neighbors) didn't want to be shown online?

Yes, I figured that some might not be too happy about having their windows or front doors online and recorded, so I added those.

Quote Watsisname ()
I thought cosmic ray strikes usually appeared as specks. They sometimes appear linear? Seems like it would take a very improbable intersection angle on the sensor.

Apparently, but I find it surprising myself, in particular such a long line. I'm not sure what the physical explanation is. But I have no other explanation, unless someone in my neighbourhood is firing with tracer ammo.

If you search for cosmic ray artifact Google will give you similar pictures.





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
WatsisnameDate: Sunday, 21.09.2014, 22:30 | Message # 378
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 2610
Status: Offline
I think cosmic ray (or muon decay product of one) is by far the most likely explanation, it's just that as you say the extreme track length is surprising. It makes a lot more sense now after realizing the sensor is oriented roughly vertically, unlike in most terrestrial-based CCD astronomy. Then you expect fewer events, but longer tracks on average, with ones as long as that rare, but inevitable given enough time.




 
Fireinthehole-Date: Saturday, 27.09.2014, 11:30 | Message # 379
Pioneer
Group: Translators
Sweden
Messages: 365
Status: Offline
For the first time in my life I got to see some Zodiacal light.


Milky Way disappearing behind the city lights.





Love Space Engine!
 
WatsisnameDate: Saturday, 27.09.2014, 12:14 | Message # 380
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 2610
Status: Offline
Very nice! That first shot is so good it could be marketable. smile

I've also seen the zodiacal light only once, while traveling overnight from La Paz, Bolivia to Cusco, Peru. It was noticeably triangular, stretching perhaps 30 degrees above the horizon. It's amazing how something so faint can seem so bright from a truly dark sky.





 
Fireinthehole-Date: Saturday, 27.09.2014, 12:27 | Message # 381
Pioneer
Group: Translators
Sweden
Messages: 365
Status: Offline
Watsisname, thank you. I'm really glad you like it smile

This picture was taken at latitude 58 N, so the triangular shape wasn't prominent for the naked eye, however one could distinguish a slightly brighter area in the sky in that direction. Jupiter helped me pick out the ecliptic smile

I guess it's much more visible in South America wink





Love Space Engine!
 
WatsisnameDate: Sunday, 28.09.2014, 08:33 | Message # 382
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 2610
Status: Offline
Absolutely, they're phenomenal shots. The cluster of trees being cast in silhouette by it makes for a great composition as well. I'm glad you got to see it -- zodiacal light is a rare thing for people to see in this day and age.

Unrelated: tonight I tried applying the stacking technique for another Milky Way shot, using six 20s exposures, or two minutes of data. This is probably about as good as I can get from this location with current equipment.






 
WatsisnameDate: Wednesday, 08.10.2014, 21:45 | Message # 383
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 2610
Status: Offline
Captures of last night's eclipse. Had to drive ~300 miles to Eastern Washington to avoid the clouds for this. Call me crazy, but I'll travel even for the lunars. They're magical. smile






 
Fireinthehole-Date: Wednesday, 08.10.2014, 21:52 | Message # 384
Pioneer
Group: Translators
Sweden
Messages: 365
Status: Offline
Quote Watsisname ()
Captures of last night's eclipse. Had to drive ~300 miles to Eastern Washington to avoid the clouds for this. Call me crazy, but I'll travel even for the lunars. They're magical.

Incredible shots! I really wish I could have seen it from here sad Next eclipse for Europeans is on 28 september 2015 smile





Love Space Engine!
 
WatsisnameDate: Thursday, 09.10.2014, 19:14 | Message # 385
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 2610
Status: Offline
Yep, you'll be well placed for that one, and it has similar magnitude. smile You also get a strongly central eclipse in July, 2018. I've never seen one of those. Won't get a good one like that in North America until 2029!

The next eclipse on April 4th will be interesting in a different way -- magnitude 1.001 with totality lasting only 5 minutes. Pretty short!





 
midtskogenDate: Friday, 10.10.2014, 07:10 | Message # 386
Star Engineer
Group: Users
Norway
Messages: 1671
Status: Offline
Perfect exposures!

I'm currently pondering whether I shall bother at all to photograph the totality of the [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse_of_March_20,_2015]2015-03-20[/url] [EDIT: urls don't embed properly if they contain a comma] solar eclipse or simply enjoy the show. It will last 2 minutes 27 seconds. Less rush with lunar eclipses, though.





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI


Edited by midtskogen - Friday, 10.10.2014, 07:14
 
WatsisnameDate: Friday, 10.10.2014, 17:01 | Message # 387
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 2610
Status: Offline
That's always a tough call to make, but I think I would lean towards just enjoying the show. I've heard many stories of people who photograph totality and regret it later, because during the rush to compensate for rapidly changing light conditions, they see almost none of the event with their eyes! Especially true for the shorter eclipses -- 147 seconds goes by fast.

The other thing about photographing totality is that there is no single exposure that can pick out the range of detail (especially in the corona) that the eye can see. It's way too much dynamic range. The same thing happens with lunar eclipses as well, when there's a crescent remaining. The eye at that point can see both the penumbral detail and the red glow of the umbral shadow, but a camera can only expose for one or the other.

Whatever you choose to do, I hope you get to see it! I'm waiting on 2017. smile

Added:
I just realized after looking at APOD that Uranus was right next to the moon during the eclipse. Sure enough, it's in my shots as a bright blue/green dot, below and left. I'd thought it was just a star!


I wonder if Earth was transiting the Sun from Uranus' view?





 
Fireinthehole-Date: Friday, 10.10.2014, 18:05 | Message # 388
Pioneer
Group: Translators
Sweden
Messages: 365
Status: Offline
Question: It has been such a long time since I saw a lunar eclipse (august 2008 being the most recent), how dark is the Moon during an eclipse? What is the Moon's apparent magnitude?




Love Space Engine!
 
WatsisnameDate: Friday, 10.10.2014, 19:50 | Message # 389
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 2610
Status: Offline
Pretty dark, but not black. I'm not sure what the effective magnitude would be, but it gets dark enough that the Milky Way, which is otherwise totally obliterated by the moonlight, becomes visible. The change an ambient light during the eclipse is one of the most striking things about it if you can see it from a dark site away from the cities.

The exact brightness and color can vary from one eclipse to another, as it depends on how deep the moon is in Earth's shadow, and the extent of cloud cover and volcanic aerosols in Earth's atmosphere. With a typical "clear" atmosphere, the core of the shadow is a dark red, becoming brighter and more orange/yellow toward the edges. The picture at the ~11o'clock position is a pretty good representation of how the eye sees it.





 
HarbingerDawnDate: Friday, 10.10.2014, 19:51 | Message # 390
Cosmic Curator
Group: Administrators
United States
Messages: 8714
Status: Offline
Quote Fireinthehole ()
how dark is the Moon during an eclipse? What is the Moon's apparent magnitude?

It depends on many factors, including the Moon's distance, how deeply into eclipse it goes, and atmospheric conditions on Earth (which affect the amount and color of light that the Moon receives).

Quote Watsisname ()
I wonder if Earth was transiting the Sun from Uranus' view?

No, at least not according to Stellarium, but it did come within ~1 minute of arc of the solar disk.





All forum users, please read this!
My SE mods and addons
Phenom II X6 1090T 3.2 GHz, 16 GB DDR3 RAM, GTX 970 3584 MB VRAM
 
Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Astrophotography (Post your astrophotos here)
Page 26 of 41«1224252627284041»
Search: