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Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » What asteroid/moon would be the best live on?
What asteroid/moon would be the best live on?
steeljaw354Date: Tuesday, 26.07.2016, 21:14 | Message # 1
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What asteroid/moon should I live on?

Let's say I have enough food and water that would last me a while on the moon/asteroid, and stuff a person would need to survive. If I was going to live on an asteroid/moon which should I choose? From the following criteria.

1) Must have enough sunlight for a large size solar array
2) Where nobody will visit
3) Has enough gravity, if I jump at Full force I won't be able to fly off
4) Where I can have a radio and send messages to Earth
5) Where nobody would see/know about my operations on the asteroid
6) Must be part of a multiple moon system (if a moon)
7) Must not have a lot of radiation


Edited by steeljaw354 - Tuesday, 26.07.2016, 21:26
 
WatsisnameDate: Wednesday, 27.07.2016, 08:25 | Message # 2
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1) More sunlight actually means you can get by with a smaller solar array for your power. Closer to the sun is obviously better, but there's no hard limit.
2) What determines whether someone will visit or not?
3) Okay; we can calculate something concrete for this. The minimum radius to be able to jump and not escape is


If we assume the average person can jump about a meter in 1g (a bit generous), which is around 4m/s, and the object is rocky, then we need the object to be at least 5km in diameter. However, jumping at even a small fraction of escape speed results in spending a long time before touching down again, and even walking would be essentially impossible. Even at Mars gravity (0.4g), walking speeds are about half of that on Earth. We'd really want the object to be much larger than this -- like the hundred kilometer range -- to have enough gravity to reasonably move around. So, that rules out moons like Phobos/Deimos, and other minor moons or small asteroids.

4) I assume this works pretty much anywhere. How powerful is your radio?
5) ?
6) This rules out the Earth's Moon.
7) This rules out moons in radiation belts, like Io, Europa, Ganymede, and probably the inner moons of the other gas giants as well.

What's left?

Ceres and other large asteroids. Callisto. The larger/outer Saturnian moons, maybe?





 
steeljaw354Date: Wednesday, 27.07.2016, 14:22 | Message # 3
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For a solar array I would like to have one a few football fields across even if the asteroid/moon gets reasonable sunlight. I would like to bring close friends and some people with me to the asteroid/moon. Let's say I already have enough supplies to boast 100 people for 100 years somehow and a huge base that fills up a crater or something with amenities and such. Some sort of internet possible?

Let's say I have something like a radio tower on the moon/asteroid, something that can normally penetrate earth's atmosphere and a receiver. For rule 5 it means that I could have a large base or colony on the moon/asteroid that won't be discovered/noticed. What would be the best objects out of these rules to live on? List the things in terms of closer to earth, most amount of sunlight, and most gravity. If I did have a base on the object, I would play it silent for a few years and then just blast radio signals and see what happens.

For rule 2 it means the object is unlikely to be visited by humans or spacecraft with high res cameras.


Edited by steeljaw354 - Wednesday, 27.07.2016, 16:35
 
AlekDate: Wednesday, 27.07.2016, 17:59 | Message # 4
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Quote steeljaw354 ()
the object is unlikely to be visited by humans or spacecraft with high res cameras.


Maybe the farthest side of Iapetus from Saturn? Cassini wouldn't be able to see it and it's relatively large, there's plenty of water around but probably no subsurface ocean to contaminate, it's not too far from the sun to get decent amounts of light (don't expect Earthlike amounts of light, of course) Unless a spacecraft is sent there specifically to study Iapetus, your base should be safe from people seeing it, for the most part, if Cassini is any sort of example, messages can be sent to Earth, it is part of a multiple moon system, and due to it's distance from both the sun and Saturn, there wouldn't be a lot of radiation.





Living among the stars, I find my way. I grow in strength through knowledge of the space I occupy, until I become the ruler of my own interstellar empire of sorts. Though The world was made for the day, I was made for the night, and thus, the universe itself is within my destiny.
 
steeljaw354Date: Wednesday, 27.07.2016, 18:51 | Message # 5
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Might do. The near side would be perfect with the moons and saturn in the sky would be nice. But a body closer to the sun would be nice for my solar panels and a view of the earth through a telescope would be nice.

Edited by steeljaw354 - Wednesday, 27.07.2016, 18:55
 
Bells_TheoremDate: Thursday, 28.07.2016, 04:14 | Message # 6
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I'll go with Titan.

1) Must have enough sunlight for a large size solar array:
Not really

2) Where nobody will visit:
I doubt you will get many salesmen showing up

3) Has enough gravity, if I jump at Full force I won't be able to fly off:
Not only will you not fly off, you will also not suffer as much from low gravity wasting of bone and muscle that you would on most other moons and asteroids.

4) Where I can have a radio and send messages to Earth
Probably could manage, especially if relay satellites are allowed.

5) Where nobody would see/know about my operations on the asteroid:
Atmosphere and clouds are pretty opaque all the time. You also could tunnel into the ice for your habitat.

6) Must be part of a multiple moon system (if a moon)
Plenty of moons.

7) Must not have a lot of radiation
Certainly the best protection you can get on any moon or asteroid and still have access to the surface.
 
steeljaw354Date: Thursday, 28.07.2016, 14:03 | Message # 7
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Titan would be good except I'd be staring at a yellow sky all the time
 
AlekDate: Thursday, 28.07.2016, 16:51 | Message # 8
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Quote steeljaw354 ()
Might do. The near side would be perfect with the moons and saturn in the sky would be nice. But a body closer to the sun would be nice for my solar panels and a view of the earth through a telescope would be nice.

Quote steeljaw354 ()
Titan would be good except I'd be staring at a yellow sky all the time


So you're looking for a good sky view too, along with being able to see Earth? I'm out of ideas...





Living among the stars, I find my way. I grow in strength through knowledge of the space I occupy, until I become the ruler of my own interstellar empire of sorts. Though The world was made for the day, I was made for the night, and thus, the universe itself is within my destiny.
 
steeljaw354Date: Thursday, 28.07.2016, 17:25 | Message # 9
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Let's revise these criteria.

1) Must orbit a planet
2) Must not have alot of radiation
3) A large base not visible from orbit
4) Must be able to communicate from earth with a large radio station like antenna
5) Must have enough gravity where I won't fly off the surface and where I can move around with relative ease and not be floating.

The issue with electricity is solved by using a nuclear reactor or generator.


Edited by steeljaw354 - Thursday, 28.07.2016, 20:41
 
SpaceEngineerDate: Thursday, 28.07.2016, 21:18 | Message # 10
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Callisto. Large base is easy to hide there, unlike on small asteroid. Nuclear reactor can cool itself in cold icy crust of the moon.




 
steeljaw354Date: Thursday, 28.07.2016, 23:51 | Message # 11
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Well wouldn't it cause the ice to melt?
 
SpaceEngineerDate: Friday, 29.07.2016, 07:39 | Message # 12
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Just compute everything (heat transfer) before building the power plant. It is now that hard if you have such level of technology.




 
steeljaw354Date: Friday, 29.07.2016, 12:50 | Message # 13
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Callisto sounds good, so what part of it should I have my base on?
 
SpaceEngineerDate: Friday, 29.07.2016, 17:37 | Message # 14
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On a leading hemisphere (to reduce radiation level), and on a hemisphere faced to Jupiter (if you want to see it and other Galiean moons), probably close to equator (if you want to use solar panels).




 
steeljaw354Date: Friday, 29.07.2016, 18:52 | Message # 15
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How would one manage to adapt to the day cycle, orbit, sunlight, jupiter brightness and such?
 
Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » What asteroid/moon would be the best live on?
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