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Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Astronomers say a Neptune-sized planet lurks beyond Pluto
Astronomers say a Neptune-sized planet lurks beyond Pluto
anonymousgamerDate: Wednesday, 20.01.2016, 18:39 | Message # 1
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Link to article

I dunno what you guys think, but this seems pretty legit to me.





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DoctorOfSpaceDate: Wednesday, 20.01.2016, 18:53 | Message # 2
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It is Nibiru.




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AlekDate: Wednesday, 20.01.2016, 18:57 | Message # 3
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Uh...The theory about it coming from the formation of the solar system then being knocked out...I came up with that exact thing before I ever even read a full article mentioning how they thought it was formed...How it's possible I thought of it then being seen in an article I don't know but apparently it happened...




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SalvoDate: Wednesday, 20.01.2016, 19:20 | Message # 4
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If it really exists... well, it's a pretty scary but also interesting thing. I mean... for all this time there was a Neptune-size planet that we've never seen, awesome! But what else could be out there? Is there another planet we didn't seen? Something dangerous someway? This opens a lot of possibilities. wacko




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HarbingerDawnDate: Thursday, 21.01.2016, 00:50 | Message # 5
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If anyone wants to add the planet to SE, here you go:

Code
Planet    "Planet Nine"
{
    ParentBody     "Sol"

    Mass            10

    Orbit
    {
  RefPlane       "Ecliptic"
  PericenterDist  250
  Eccentricity    0.6
  Inclination     -30
  AscendingNode   280
  ArgOfPericenter -30
  MeanAnomaly     228.5
    }
}





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parameciumkidDate: Thursday, 21.01.2016, 03:24 | Message # 6
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Wait a minute!

Perhaps not now, but until a few years back, there certainly was a Neptune-sized planet beyond Pluto - Neptune was beyond Pluto!

Okay I've had my fun and will shut up and go sulk in the corner now.





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WatsisnameDate: Thursday, 21.01.2016, 06:41 | Message # 7
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Lol, I was thinking the same when I first heard this. tongue




 
JoeCapricornDate: Thursday, 21.01.2016, 22:25 | Message # 8
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How cold could such a planet get?

I've always wondered if a planet could ever get cold enough (also assuming it has a hydrogen dominated atmosphere but a defined surface of a terrestrial planet) that it has seas of liquid hydrogen. Or at least if it were a gas giant, in the coldest reaches of its atmosphere hydrogen rain occurs.

I know there are theories of hydrogen and helium rain deep inside Neptune, but in a more exotic high pressure and high temperature state.
 
WatsisnameDate: Friday, 22.01.2016, 05:40 | Message # 9
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Quote parameciumkid ()
In a near-perfect vacuum, the boiling temperature of Hydrogen is lower than the ambient temperature of space.


Lol what? Hydrogen does not even have a boiling point at near vacuum pressure. The liquid phase does not exist below ~0.1atm, nor does it exist below ~14K. Besides, Joe is asking specifically in the context of planetary surfaces with atmospheres, not near vacuum conditions.

I don't think there's any particular reason you could not have a "terrestrial" planet with liquid hydrogen seas. From simple equilibrium temperature considerations, it would have to be in the realm of about 100 to 200 AU from a sun-like star to have the right surface temperature.





 
HimselfDate: Monday, 25.01.2016, 23:41 | Message # 10
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Additionally, a Neptune-sized planet would probably get most of its heat from its interior.
 
JonahrfDate: Thursday, 28.01.2016, 22:11 | Message # 11
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Possible new planet in our solar system
Code
Planet    "Nine"
{
    ParentBody     "Sol"
    Class  "GasGiant"
    Mass  10

    Atmosphere
    {
  Height      1000
  Model      "Neptune"
  Bright      10
    }

    Surface
    {
    colorSea       (0.20, 0.26, 0.33, 1.00)
    colorShelf     (0.25, 0.33, 0.45, 1.00)
    colorBeach     (0.22, 0.38, 0.56, 1.00)
    colorDesert    (0.26, 0.43, 0.53, 1.00)
    colorLowland   (0.24, 0.43, 0.63, 1.00)
    colorUpland    (0.24, 0.51, 0.78, 1.00)
    colorRock      (0.34, 0.58, 0.75, 1.00)
    colorSnow      (1.00, 1.00, 1.00, 1.00)
  Exposure      5
    }

    Orbit
     {
    RefPlane       "Ecliptic"
    PericenterDist  250
    Eccentricity    0.6
    Inclination     -30
    AscendingNode   280
    ArgOfPericenter -30
    MeanAnomaly     228.5
     }
}


Edited by Jonahrf - Thursday, 28.01.2016, 22:13
 
Bells_TheoremDate: Sunday, 31.01.2016, 04:26 | Message # 12
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It's actually believed to be an Ice Giant, not likely a Gas Giant.
 
ZackGDate: Sunday, 31.01.2016, 07:16 | Message # 13
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Sorry but as a guy born in the 80s, I will always designate Pluto as the 9th planet.




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connorneal2005Date: Wednesday, 03.02.2016, 16:52 | Message # 14
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Planet 9 add-on for SE 0.974 here

Insert: SpaceEngine > catalogs > planets

Attachments: MySystem.sc(3Kb)





How big is the universe?

Edited by connorneal2005 - Wednesday, 03.02.2016, 16:54
 
steeljaw354Date: Thursday, 04.02.2016, 23:36 | Message # 15
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I think "nox" would be good name.
 
Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Astronomers say a Neptune-sized planet lurks beyond Pluto
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