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Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Mars thread (Anything and everything about Mars)
Mars thread
HarbingerDawnDate: Friday, 28.12.2012, 23:51 | Message # 91
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If I saw that hanging in the sky the first word that comes to mind is ominous.

You have the mind of the ancients sad I like Mars, the color doesn't bother me in the least. I think it's exciting.





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DoctorOfSpaceDate: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 00:25 | Message # 92
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You have the mind of the ancients

Its called imagination and letting reality influence it. Plus red has that emotional impact so put all that together and from my perspective you get a more colorful view on things.

wizard





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HarbingerDawnDate: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 08:40 | Message # 93
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Tharsis Montes





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HarbingerDawnDate: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 09:43 | Message # 94
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Aww, Harb, why'd you change your avatar? I liked your old one.

The winds of change caught my sail and pulled me out to sea. Couldn't help it wink





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HarbingerDawnDate: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 09:43 | Message # 95
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[Merged from another thread]

One recent study suggests that plate tectonics could be behind several unusual features on Mars, such as the Tharsis Montes and Valles Marineris, that have no analogs anywhere else in the Solar system aside from on Earth.

http://www.space.com/17087-m....cs.html

I personally think that this is a very exciting possibility and it would be something that would be great for human geologists to investigate on Mars one day, and it also brings more understanding of how different geological processes on planets come to be, and how frequent they are (i.e. how common Earth-like worlds really are).





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Antza2Date: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 09:43 | Message # 96
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I thought that mars had a solid crust and that caused gigantic volcano eruptions in the past. That would also explain giant volcanoes and Valles Marineris, which i heard was formed when the crust ripped because of the extreme pressure under it.




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HarbingerDawnDate: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 09:44 | Message # 97
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Quote (Antza2)
That would also explain giant volcanoes and Valles Marineris, which i heard was formed when the crust ripped because of the extreme pressure under it.

That is what I have always heard too, but the guy who has advanced this new theory says that tectonics can actually better explain these features (why the three large Tharsis volcanoes formed in a line, and why exactly Marineris is the way that it is). The article explains in more detail, and I must say that the way it is described does make sense.





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Antza2Date: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 09:44 | Message # 98
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
That is what I have always heard too, but the guy who has advanced this new theory says that tectonics can actually better explain these features (why the three large Tharsis volcanoes formed in a line, and why exactly Marineris is the way that it is). The article explains in more detail, and I must say that the way it is described does make sense.

I can agree on the volcanoes since i always found it odd that they were in such a straight line. Marineris on the other hand could easily have formed like ocean trenches here on Earth





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HarbingerDawnDate: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 09:44 | Message # 99
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Marineris on the other hand could easily have formed like ocean trenches here on Earth

All of the ocean trenches I am familiar with have formed as a result of plate tectonics.





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Antza2Date: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 09:44 | Message # 100
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
All of the ocean trenches I am familiar with have formed as a result of plate tectonics.

That's what i meant.





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HarbingerDawnDate: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 09:44 | Message # 101
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Quote (Antza2)
That's what i meant.

Oh okay. I thought that what you were saying was that tectonics made sense for Tharsis but not for Marineris. My mistake smile





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DaninAusDate: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 09:44 | Message # 102
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Does Mars have a molten core? If not, what is lubricating these plate tectonics?

Earth has water plus the molten core, Mercury doesn't and the crust is under extreme pressure (from what I've read and heard).

Venus, though it does show signs of plate tectonics with it's mountain ranges, doesn't have many impact craters but the could also be due to it's thick and highly pressured atmosphere that could destroy most rocky things that enter the atmosphere which doesn't give it much of a chance to impact the surface.

If it is plate tectonics on Mars, then I can see how, logically, it could have ripped the the crust which formed the Valles Marineris while pushing the ground up which would have softened it and then the 3 volcanoes erupted through the weakened crust.

If that is true, then I'll have to throw out all of my DVDs and books that I have again.
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 09:45 | Message # 103
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Does Mars have a molten core? If not, what is lubricating these plate tectonics?

It's probably safe to say that Mars has a molten interior, though it may not be as hot or as active as Earth's. And Mars probably has underground reservoirs of liquid water which could aid the process. But as the article explains, the process on Mars is very much slower and more limited than on Earth.

Quote (DaninAus)
If that is true, then I'll have to throw out all of my DVDs and books that I have again.

I stopped buying hard copy astronomy resources years ago smile So much of it is obsolete as soon as it is published.





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DoctorOfSpaceDate: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 09:45 | Message # 104
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Quote (DaninAus)
Does Mars have a molten core? If not, what is lubricating these plate tectonics?


It does but since Mars is much smaller than Earth its magnetic field weakened faster and its core is currently solidifying. Right now the core is less liquid more goopy magma with a solid core of iron/nickel/sulfur.

Jeez Harbinger you do post fast......





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Edited by DoctorOfSpace - Thursday, 16.08.2012, 02:01
 
DaninAusDate: Saturday, 29.12.2012, 09:45 | Message # 105
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Quote (DoctorOfSpace)
It does but since Mars is much smaller than Earth its magnetic field weakened faster and its core is currently solidifying. Right now the core is less liquid more goopy magma with a solid core of iron/nickel/sulfur.


Thanks, very informative. From what I'm guessing, the core solidifying is probably why we haven't really seen any evidence of activity on Mars in a while. If that core does solidify and the planet cools, any chance of finding current life (like microbes) in an underground aquifer starts getting very small as that aquifer will freeze as well leaving only evidence of life.

That would also mean that the plate tectonics would have already stopped am I right? Also, with the non existent magnetic field, we humans would have to find some sort of solution for that before we could even think about heading to Mars ourselves as the radiation from the sun would fry us in minutes.

Edit: Another question is then, where is all this methane gas coming from that's being detected? Could it be a side effect of the core solidifying?


Edited by DaninAus - Thursday, 16.08.2012, 04:45
 
Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Mars thread (Anything and everything about Mars)
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