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Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Mars thread (Anything and everything about Mars)
Mars thread
spacerDate: Monday, 17.10.2016, 20:29 | Message # 211
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great article about one of the rovers goals:
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016....science

finding fossils sound great





"we began as wanderers, and we are wanderers still"
-carl sagan

-space engine photographer


Edited by spacer - Monday, 17.10.2016, 20:30
 
BananaDate: Monday, 17.10.2016, 22:43 | Message # 212
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Imagine the effect a potential fossil found on Mars would have on Earth. The smallest bacterium's remains could cause monumental excitement. Astrobiology as a whole could change immensely, all because of a tiny, single-celled organism's fossils. That is, after the claim has been tested countless times.




Hello.

Edited by Banana - Monday, 17.10.2016, 22:43
 
HornblowerDate: Monday, 17.10.2016, 22:55 | Message # 213
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Imagine multi-cellular or fossils of complex structure! One day, there will be a field called "Martian Paleontology"! Imagine what crazy things could be buried deep beneath its surface!
 
spacerDate: Monday, 17.10.2016, 22:57 | Message # 214
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that one thing that really drive me to be an astrobiologist and not only study biology on mars but all across the solar system and Beyond




"we began as wanderers, and we are wanderers still"
-carl sagan

-space engine photographer
 
HornblowerDate: Monday, 17.10.2016, 23:02 | Message # 215
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spacer, ofcourse! It's fun to speculate about unicellular birds on Jupiter! From what I understand, the field right now is completely open to speculation, because alien life might not be even made of "cells." They could be made of something similar to "cells" or completely different.
 
WatsisnameDate: Monday, 17.10.2016, 23:18 | Message # 216
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that one thing that really drive me to be an astrobiologist and not only study biology on mars but all across the solar system and Beyond


Astrobiology is an amazing field! It calls upon knowledge from so many other fields -- chemistry, biology, physics, geology and planetary science. It's a great intellectual experience to think about and work on, and endlessly exciting for the potential of discovering answers to really deep questions that keep us up at 3 in the morning. happy





 
spacerDate: Monday, 17.10.2016, 23:26 | Message # 217
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Watsisname, one thing that i wonder that: i choosed to study chimesty and physics and left behind biology. (you could only pick 2)
will astrobiology field will be open to me? or i will still need to study biology.
the biology i didnt choose is human and earth animals biology. its not alien life biology but of course to know about alien biology you first should know your own biology.
its really busy to learn chimestry, physics and biology all together. and i wont be able to go to university until the age of 22...





"we began as wanderers, and we are wanderers still"
-carl sagan

-space engine photographer
 
WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 18.10.2016, 01:36 | Message # 218
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will astrobiology field will be open to me? or i will still need to study biology.


You would need it at some point, but that doesn't necessarily have to be right now. smile You can certainly cover the chemistry and physics now, and then later on go into a dedicated program at a university which will cover anything else you might need. (Including more chemistry and more physics!)





 
FastFourierTransformDate: Tuesday, 18.10.2016, 09:44 | Message # 219
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2020 rover suggested landing sites: what do you prefer? smile


MELAS CHASMA PLEASE!!!

Valles Marineris is probably the most spectacular geological sight in the entire Solar System. I hope they land there. And Next time in the Olympus Mons caldera (it's basically in outer space so not much problems with solar panels getting covered by dust and much more exploration time-period)
 
spacerDate: Tuesday, 18.10.2016, 16:08 | Message # 220
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"we began as wanderers, and we are wanderers still"
-carl sagan

-space engine photographer
 
midtskogenDate: Tuesday, 18.10.2016, 18:57 | Message # 221
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will astrobiology field will be open to me? or i will still need to study biology.

Biology is about complex Earth life and habitats, which isn't what you would look for in space. I would put geology/geophysics before biology on your list. And physics should be astrophysics.





NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI


Edited by midtskogen - Tuesday, 18.10.2016, 20:37
 
spacerDate: Tuesday, 18.10.2016, 19:21 | Message # 222
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i think its gonna be so complicated to learn so many things. but even if i will know all of that at age of 60 it will be worth it.
if i could i would learn every science related subject tongue biggrin

but dont you need to understand earth biology to know about alien biology? see how different they are, or maybe the processes in the body of the alien creature will be similar to us but not exactly like us.

every evening i look at mars in the south. maybe one day i will be there searching for life or will study them.
and the chimesty of them and mars. while at nights i will write on my board astrophysics tongue smile
and so i wont need to leave behind any subject of science.
i see myself there writing a book about the journy and about mars...
but who knows i may just dream too much.





"we began as wanderers, and we are wanderers still"
-carl sagan

-space engine photographer


Edited by spacer - Tuesday, 18.10.2016, 19:32
 
WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 18.10.2016, 23:25 | Message # 223
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Quote FastFourierTransform ()
Valles Marineris is probably the most spectacular geological sight in the entire Solar System. I hope they land there. And Next time in the Olympus Mons caldera (it's basically in outer space so not much problems with solar panels getting covered by dust and much more exploration time-period)


The scientists would love to land in places like these, but the engineers and mission planners always veto it. Too much risk. sad They're right, of course, but it means it drastically reduces the options for potential landing sites. Can't be too steep, or too rocky, or too high altitude (less aerodynamic drag and faster terminal velocity to contend with). Most of the safest sites are geologically boring, and most of the interesting sites are dangerous to try to land in. The process for selecting a Mars landing site is actually a very long and complex one with a lot of input and debate, all in the name of minimizing the risk vs. reward ratio.

The first few Apollo landing sites were also chosen in a similar way. Mostly boring places. Later on when as they gained confidence in their ability to land within a very small target area, they began exploring more interesting places with the purpose of studying as much new lunar geology as possible. Hopefully the same will occur on Mars and we'll someday explore the really cool places like Noctis Labyrinthus and Olympus caldera. smile





 
steeljaw354Date: Tuesday, 18.10.2016, 23:26 | Message # 224
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Watsisname, Should we Nuke Mars's north pole to see what happens?
 
WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 18.10.2016, 23:34 | Message # 225
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I imagine a lot of people would have a lot of reasons against doing so. Myself, included. smile "To see what happens" is also not a very good reason to do a very expensive experiment. Experiments are hypothesis testers. There should be a clear idea of why performing that experiment should be scientifically valuable.




 
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