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Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Asteroids, meteors, and meteorites (Everything related to space rocks.)
Asteroids, meteors, and meteorites
HarbingerDawnDate: Thursday, 27.06.2013, 06:59 | Message # 121
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Quote (midtskogen)
that would be something I can't wait for to see

I had the same thought. That would be an absolutely incredible video if it exists.





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WatsisnameDate: Thursday, 27.06.2013, 07:10 | Message # 122
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I was totally confused by those statements, first thinking that it meant the whole event up to and including the splash was caught on film or camera, but I'm wondering now if that's not what actually happened.

What I'm thinking (and I really hope I'm wrong), is that he captured the meteor trail, because obviously that was extremely noticeable and long-lasting, then visually saw the splash in the lake afterward. I'm doubting he caught the splash on film because it would have been very brief and with no warning for it, and if he did get it then I think we'd have seen it already along with all the other stuff that got shared with the world that morning or shortly thereafter.

But again, really hope I'm wrong because that would be amazing to see; as you say I don't think anything of the sort has ever been documented before.





 
midtskogenDate: Thursday, 27.06.2013, 08:21 | Message # 123
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Yes, even a 300 kg rock would be near impossible to see moving at 300 km/h (or whatever, its minimum speed, terminal velocity, depends a lot on shape) unless you're pretty close and know where to look, but it's not entirely impossible that someone got it on video accidentally. A lot of people began filming after the fireball, and given enough running cameras, it is eventually to be expected that somebody will record something "impossible". 300 kg meteorites have been found before. A video would be much more interesting.




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neutronium76Date: Friday, 28.06.2013, 12:24 | Message # 124
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Interesting article about the shockwave caused by the Chelyabinsk meteor.




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HarbingerDawnDate: Monday, 19.08.2013, 17:44 | Message # 125
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A helpful graphic for learning space rock terminology.






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midtskogenDate: Wednesday, 25.09.2013, 19:00 | Message # 126
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Helpful, but I think the definition of "bolide" is a bit misleading. Neither bolide or fireball has strict definitions. A bolide is usually simply a very bright fireball. I prefer to call anything brighter than Venus (at its brightest) a fireball, and for something as bright as the full moon or brighter (i.e. clear shadows will appear) I'd say "bolide".

One could also say that bolides are more likely to produce meteorites than fireballs, but I think it's hard to set a minimum luminosity needed for something that survives to the ground. It's safer to say that bolides have the potential of producing a lot more meteorites than fireballs.

The 4kg meteorite found in Norway a couple of months ago was most likely from a fireball much fainter than the full moon. Looks like around -8 - -9 in my footage at 200 km distance, so let's say about -10 at a standard 100 km distance (but hard to judge, witness reports suggest that it might have been brighter). It even fell steep, 57 degrees, but at very low speed, about 13 km/s. No more meteorites have yet been found in the area despite searches. The area is treeless, much peat bog, so rocks not appearing to belong where they are, are relatively easy to spot. However, there are also many lakes and ponds and if anything has landed in one of those, it will never be found.

I can't be 100% sure that I have the right fireball for the meteorite, but bearings from three different cameras (one of which is a bit poor, though) intersect 30km above ground barely 10 km away from where the meteorite was found, and since the condition of the meteorite suggests that it's no more than a few years old, it seems unlikely that there have been two fireballs events in exactly the same area in jusy a few years.

Added (22.08.2013, 22:27)
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Just a little video clip taken in July by Morten Bilet. The finder is excavating the meteorite "crater", which has been sent to the Museum of natural history in Oslo. It was not really a crater, just a small dent, since the ground was frozen at impact.

Added (25.09.2013, 22:00)
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Fist size meteorite recovered from Chebarkul lake and work is underway to uncover the large chunk: story




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HarbingerDawnDate: Wednesday, 25.09.2013, 19:15 | Message # 127
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They found a fragment weighing hundreds of tons? Wow! I can't wait to see them lift that to the surface cool




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Edited by HarbingerDawn - Wednesday, 25.09.2013, 19:15
 
midtskogenDate: Wednesday, 25.09.2013, 19:19 | Message # 128
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
They found a fragment weighing hundreds of tons? Wow! I can't wait to see them lift that to the surface

Surely wrong. Hundreds of kilos is plausible. The hole in the ice was 6 metres across.

Perhaps the journalist confused the salvage with Costa Concordia. smile





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Edited by midtskogen - Wednesday, 25.09.2013, 20:35
 
RockoRocksDate: Wednesday, 25.09.2013, 19:50 | Message # 129
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
A helpful graphic for learning space rock terminology.

You have no idea how much people (and sometimes me too) misuse/confuse these terms.





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midtskogenDate: Thursday, 07.11.2013, 14:22 | Message # 130
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US fireball 27th Sept:


Added (07.10.2013, 00:33)
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Interesting meteorite find in Brazil:

http://www.meteorito.com.br/meteori....=&idT=2
http://lunarmeteoritehunters.blogspot.no/2013....13.html

Added (07.10.2013, 00:38)
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Update on a fireball that I caught on video this morning.

Video

It was also photographed from Denmark, suggesting that it reached an altitude of 35 km. The speed was about 27 km/s, angle 29 degrees. Probably no meteorites, but cannot be ruled out. Path:


Added (17.10.2013, 08:37)
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A 600+ kg rock recovered from lake Chebarkul:


It remains to be verified that this is a Chelyabinsk meteorite, but the size seems consistent with the 6 m hole in the ice. Story here. It broke apart when they perhaps too eagerly tried to get it on a scale, though. Another storey here.

Added (07.11.2013, 02:46)
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An interesting article on the Chelyabinsk event: http://www.nrk.no/viten/forste-studiar-av-russlandmeteoritt-1.11341906 (in Norwegian, I'm not sure how well Google translate will do). It refers to one study in Science and two in Nature.

We've also had three fireballs over southern Norway in the past 24 hours, one is a bright bolide that illuminated the sky over the entire southern Norway (where clouds weren't too thick). It was much brighter than the full moon near "ground zero", where explosions were heard as well a couple minutes after the flash or less. We have some footage, but not yet enough to pinpoint its path:

http://norskmeteornettverk.no/wordpress/?p=781

Seems likely to me that it dropped a few meteorites.

Added (07.11.2013, 17:22)
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Paywalled Nature papers:

http://www.nature.com/nature....71.html
http://www.nature.com/nature....41.html




NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI


Edited by midtskogen - Thursday, 17.10.2013, 05:56
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Thursday, 07.11.2013, 18:31 | Message # 131
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Hubble has spotted an asteroid spewing out tons of dust in an intermittent and dynamic fashion, a phenomenon never before observed. The object is almost certainly neither a comet nor the aftermath of an asteroid collision. One possibility is that the asteroid's rotation rate accelerated until it began to throw dust off into space, which was then formed into thin trails by sunlight pressure. Further observations should provide evidence either for or against that hypothesis.

Read more: http://www.spacetelescope.org/news/heic1320/





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astronikiDate: Thursday, 07.11.2013, 22:26 | Message # 132
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Here's a video of the Chelyabinsk Meteor hitting the lake, not very impressive visually but still awesome.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYNPJDvTA8U





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WatsisnameDate: Thursday, 07.11.2013, 23:04 | Message # 133
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Excellent! With that pretty much the entire event including impact with the 'ground' was captured on film. smile




 
midtskogenDate: Monday, 09.12.2013, 22:35 | Message # 134
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That video is surely a world first, a meteorite impacting earth. Much more material appears to be ejected towards the east, suggesting that it still had some momentum upon impact in the direction of the original direction.

It doesn't seem possible to see the rock itself. So the "dark flight" part lacks video, but that's very unlikely that anyone captures.

Added (12.11.2013, 09:41)
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The Taurids are active now. While their numbers are few, they sometimes produce some nice fireballs:

[url=http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-fireball-debris-comet-encke-20131108,0,830091.story]LA Times[/url]

(EDIT: I don't know why making a link above didn't work, doesn't work for me at least, you just have to paste and copy from above)

Over in Norway:
2013-11-10
2013-11-08

And last year Paul Christiansen photographed this great Taurid in Denmark:


Which I also got on video from Norway:
2012-11-12

Added (18.11.2013, 17:34)
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I've been working on finding the location of a bolide which was sighted all over southern Norway almost two weeks ago. I think the location has been fairly well pinpointed now using eye witness reports and infrasound and seismic data.

Norwegian story
Similar story written in English by Mike Mazur

Most lakes in the area were covered in ice at the time, and they currently have no snow on them, so I hope people will check them before it's too late (it's a 3-4 hour drive from where I live, but I doubt I'll get the chance myself).

Added (08.12.2013, 16:20)
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This is one of the cooler lucky shots I've seen in while:

The photographer was making a picture of comet Lovejoy (in the middle of the picture just above the treetops). He made a 4 second exposure, precisely the time during which the fireball at the left edge was visible. This is the same fireball that I posted in the astrophotography thread a few days ago from a different angle. So with two hires pictures triangulation was possible with a great deal of accuracy even though both photographs were taken about 200 km away. In addition the event was loudly recorded by an infrasound array 275 km away 14 minutes after the event. Unfortunately, neither camera got the last part of the fireball, so we can't see how far down it made it, only that it got at least as far as 30 km. But because of the infrasound this is clearly a meteorite candidate. The brightness (normalised to 100km) was about -12. The speed was 19 km/s (±3 km/s). Incidence 80 degrees. Meteoroid mass about 100 kg (guesstimate). It's a pity that it's winter and hardly possible to find anything before spring.

I've made an analysis of the event on http://norskmeteornettverk.no/wordpress/?p=1041 (in Norwegian)

It fell near the western edge of Hardangervidda, which is perhaps better known as the filming location of Hoth in Star Wars. wink

Hoth meteor strike

Added (10.12.2013, 01:35)
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I sent out a press release on this event yesterday, and it sparked much interest in media, in the major newspapers, TV broadcasters and radio. Which is cool. If people in the area know that there might be meteorites there, the chances that they will be found increase a lot. It all boils down to my calculations being correct, though [done Friday night when the rest of the family had gone to bed, until 2am, just in time to get some sleep before our 2 year old woke at 6am], but I'm reasonably confident in this case. smile

http://tv.nrk.no/serie....t=5m13s





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Edited by midtskogen - Monday, 09.12.2013, 22:40
 
WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 10.12.2013, 01:48 | Message # 135
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That is really cool. smile I hope they will find something!

By the way what's the fourth image in your analysis link showing? Is that radar data?





 
Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Asteroids, meteors, and meteorites (Everything related to space rocks.)
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