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Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Asteroids, meteors, and meteorites (Everything related to space rocks.)
Asteroids, meteors, and meteorites
midtskogenDate: Sunday, 29.12.2013, 20:53 | Message # 136
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That's data from an infrasound array located 275 km away from the burst location. It detected the blast 837 seconds after the event. It's operated by NORSAR. Unfortunately, I'm not quite sure how to read that figure. But it's no doubt that it was the meteor that it recorded. I got it before I published the exact location based on the photos.

It's also visible here: http://www.norsardata.no/cgi-bin....a=ISNRS

At 18:47:16UT (among other signals that day).

EDIT: Orbit analysis.

And as can be seen in the news story, any search before spring is likely to be futile. While the location is easily accessible near populated area, this is western Norway, 2000mm rain and snow annually, avalanche infested, steep terrain. A lot of snow has fallen since the event, which currently has turned to rain.

EDIT2: The estimated blast location is really close, less than a km, to Trolltunga, a tourist attraction in the area. So as the mayor suggested in the TV story, they now have an extra treat when they market the attraction. smile

Added (29.12.2013, 23:53)
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Massive US fireball




NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI


Edited by midtskogen - Tuesday, 10.12.2013, 07:30
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Monday, 30.12.2013, 01:44 | Message # 137
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Quote midtskogen ()
Massive US fireball

Wow, very impressive.





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midtskogenDate: Friday, 03.01.2014, 09:06 | Message # 138
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An Indiegogo funded allsky camera project just started: Project Heimdal

The project looks good and I'll get involved.

Added (03.01.2014, 12:06)
---------------------------------------------
A small asteroid was discovered on Newyear's Eve and it hit Earth yesterday somewhere in the Atlantic Ocean. Story at Sky & Telescope.




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astronikiDate: Friday, 03.01.2014, 19:51 | Message # 139
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The Quadrantids are flying, here's a shot from just after dusk:





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midtskogenDate: Friday, 17.01.2014, 08:22 | Message # 140
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First properly clear night in four weeks and I caught a couple of fireballs, only 22 minutes apart:


Video: http://norskmeteornettverk.no/bilder/2014/meteorer-20140112.mp4

Added (17.01.2014, 11:22)
---------------------------------------------
Asteroid mining likely not worthwhile.




NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI


Edited by midtskogen - Monday, 13.01.2014, 09:22
 
DIS7RICTDate: Tuesday, 21.01.2014, 14:04 | Message # 141
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What do you guys think of the rock that appeared out of nowhere on Mars, caught on one of Opportunity's camera.

My theory is that it's probably just a piece of a small meteorite that impacted close by that either broke off from a collision between two larger asteroids, or from ejecta on an outer solar system moon (impact?) judging from the sulfur and magnesium and by some one in a billion (billion billion?) chance just happened to land and then roll to that spot. This is just a repost of what I commented on the article.





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midtskogenDate: Tuesday, 21.01.2014, 15:12 | Message # 142
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The trouble with that theory is that it's very unlikely. Even in space with no atmospheric protection from meteorites the chances of a close encounter with something of that size is very very small even after many years.




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DIS7RICTDate: Tuesday, 21.01.2014, 15:25 | Message # 143
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I'm aware of that and there's a good chance it didn't come from Mars since the composition is very different from anything they've ever found on the surface.

Just because it's unlikely it doesn't mean it can't happen, and that it didn't or never will happen. That's my theory until there's a better one. I don't think it was flipped out from the wheels which is one of their theories, there's almost no deep sand in that area and even if it did somehow it's still highly possible that it's from a meteorite that struck a while ago. If it wasn't from a meteorite that's even more interesting, we'll have some serious explaining to do with the composition.

As I said in the article, I'd gladly accept accept a crazier explanation.





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Edited by DIS7RICT - Tuesday, 21.01.2014, 15:34
 
WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 21.01.2014, 17:25 | Message # 144
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Is the composition consistent with any known class of meteorite or other celestial body? Is high sulfur and a factor of 2 difference in manganese truly significant, incompatible with Martian petrology? Although the hypothesis that this rock is of non-Martian origin is a working one, I don't think that conclusion follows from these observations quite so easily. smile

Opportunity is currently exploring the rim of Endeavour Crater, where a variety of new and interesting formations are exposed. To find a strange rock like this might actually be expected given the location. The rock could literally have just rolled down from the hillside between those two photos, as some have suggested. And I'm certainly no expert on how the rovers wheels interact with terrain, but I don't think there has to be deep sand for a rock to be kicked off to the side by them. Those wheels turn very slowly, but can produce a fair amount of pressure if caught up on a loose piece of material.

The rock could also be a recent piece of ejecta -- subsurface material thrown out from an impact that occurred nearby. There are a lot of working hypotheses to consider here and I don't think we should favor any particular one at this time.





 
DIS7RICTDate: Tuesday, 21.01.2014, 19:02 | Message # 145
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If further down the track -say a years time- there isn't any evidence of rocks with similar composition then we can start to suspect it's of non Martian origin, if there is then we'll still have to find out what caused them which is another mystery in itself. But until then it's a waiting game. All we can do from here with the limited information we have is guess.

However, if it was kicked up by a wheel there should/may be photo evidence of that location and the rock before Opportunity reached it's current location. Someone should really check for that.





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HarbingerDawnDate: Thursday, 23.01.2014, 00:20 | Message # 146
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Asteroid Lutetia in natural color





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DIS7RICTDate: Thursday, 23.01.2014, 20:58 | Message # 147
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That looks brilliant. Can't wait until Rosetta lands on 67P.




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neutronium76Date: Friday, 24.01.2014, 09:21 | Message # 148
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Ceres may have water jet streams spurting out of its surface when it is at perihelion. The Dawn mission will find out.




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DIS7RICTDate: Friday, 24.01.2014, 10:46 | Message # 149
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Heard about that yesterday, I didn't expect Ceres to have water.




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HarbingerDawnDate: Friday, 24.01.2014, 12:28 | Message # 150
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Quote DIS7RICT ()
I didn't expect Ceres to have water

It's an ice world, a significant portion of its interior is probably composed of water ice. Also, we've known for a long time that there were hydrated minerals on its surface, and other evidence of near-surface ice has also existed.

Go into SE and read the wiki entry for Ceres, especially the last paragraph if you don't want to read the whole thing.





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Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Asteroids, meteors, and meteorites (Everything related to space rocks.)
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