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Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Uranus and Neptune (Anything about Sol's ice giants)
Uranus and Neptune
DaninAusDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 03:03 | Message # 16
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Thanks heaps guys,

I really do value your opinions and thoughts. I have had that theory for a while and wanted some feedback and thoughts from people who are very smart and really know their stuff.

Gravity to me just seems like a very underrated thing. We see what it can do with galaxies and holding planets while they rotate around the sun so I thought it could help flip a planet on it's side like Uranus or totally reverse a planet's spin like Venus (Earth having the same effect on Venus as it races past us just like the moon slowed the Earth's spin).

Every argument I put up though, you guys had an answer. So thanks for the debate/discussion on this.
 
OrbitalResonanceDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 05:18 | Message # 17
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http://www.technologyreview.com/view....anus-is

It may have had a hight inclination and a lost moon.

Also alot smaller imapcts mabe





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WatsisnameDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 06:06 | Message # 18
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
I would like to add that recent simulations suggest that it could also have been a head-on collision between two similarly sized objects (4-5 Mars masses each). Less intuitive than the glancing blow between different sized objects, but according to the simulations it's quite possible.


Interesting, I hadn't heard of this. I did some looking and the most relevant article I could find was this one from July, is it the same one you're referring to? The impact angle they used in these simulations is indeed higher (30-35°, which is actually still shallower than statistical average for a collision -- kind of weird to call it 'head-on' in my opinion), though they are not using similar masses for the impactor and target. Maybe there's something more recent that I'm just not finding?

Pretty intriguing result from the above simulation, as it does a better job of reproducing the observed composition of the lunar material. smile Also causes a great deal more heating for both the debris and the proto-Earth.





 
SpaceEngineerDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 16:04 | Message # 19
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BTW I've read somewhere that one model of the interior structure of Uranus says that it has a solid core of ice and rock, and a thick atmosphere starting right from the core's surface, without liquid water/ammonia ocean. If this model is right, then Uranus is a giant titan-like world (or an ice world with atmosphere)! Pressure on its solid surface may reach 1 million atmospheres, and the temperature is about 2000K. In these conditions, water, methane and ammonia don't go into a liquid state, but makes a phase transition from solid state to gaseous. The atmosphere has a huge concentration of these gases, together with hydrogen and helium, but hydrogen does not go into a liquid and metallic state, like on Jupiter and Saturn. The water/ammonia/methane rains may go in higher layers of the atmosphere, but they evaporate before reaching the surface. Neptune, contrary to Uranus, probably has a huge deep ocean of liquid water/ammonia mixture under its atmosphere, so it can be classified as a giant oceania. Temperature of this ocean is quite big too; thousands of Kelvins, but it does not boil due to giant atmosphere pressure.

*





 
HarbingerDawnDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 19:04 | Message # 20
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Quote (Watsisname)
I did some looking and the most relevant article I could find was this one from July, is it the same one you're referring to?

I don't think so, it seems that the masses of objects that they used still had a wider ratio from what I remember seeing. I'll go hunt it down and post it here.

EDIT: Found it - http://www.swri.org/9what/releases/2012/earth-moon-impact.htm
So it wasn't exactly a head-on impact, that was likely a mistake in whatever source I originally read about this in.





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Edited by HarbingerDawn - Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 19:16
 
apenpaapDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 22:11 | Message # 21
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That's quite interesting; I had no idea the two planets could have such different internal structures. Also, it occurs to me that if that's true, naming Uranus after the god of the sky and Neptune after the god of the sea has been oddly approppriate with their internal structures.




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WatsisnameDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 22:13 | Message # 22
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Most excellent, thank you for finding that again HarbingerDawn. And woooow, just look how disrupted the two bodies are at 1.4 hours after first contact. Incredible!




 
DaninAusDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 23:11 | Message # 23
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I really think though that there needs to be a mission to both planets as there are so many different theories and each of them have good points and bad points.

I know the Juno mission to Jupiter is going to look deep into Jupiter to find out how gas giants are born but it will still leave a lot of unanswered questions for planets like Uranus and Neptune.
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Thursday, 25.10.2012, 01:30 | Message # 24
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Relatively recent photos of Neptune taken by Hubble, showing the planet over the course of one rotation:


One of my favorite photographs of Neptune, showing high altitude white clouds:



Neptune and Triton:


And last, here is an interesting pair of pictures. Compare the first image (Voyager 2) to the second image (Hubble):







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Edited by HarbingerDawn - Thursday, 25.10.2012, 01:43
 
apenpaapDate: Thursday, 25.10.2012, 11:49 | Message # 25
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Odd, what's with those pink spots on the first pic? I'm guessing they're not true colour but infrared representations of heat welling up from inside the planet or something?




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smjjamesDate: Thursday, 25.10.2012, 15:09 | Message # 26
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Quote (apenpaap)
Odd, what's with those pink spots on the first pic? I'm guessing they're not true colour but infrared representations of heat welling up from inside the planet or something?


Or enhancement of the white clouds? Could also be ultraviolet (complete guess based on the UVIS thing).

Most likely it's infrared though.





 
HarbingerDawnDate: Thursday, 25.10.2012, 19:53 | Message # 27
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Quote (smjjames)
Odd, what's with those pink spots on the first pic? I'm guessing they're not true colour but infrared representations of heat welling up from inside the planet or something?

They look like cloud features. Most likely those should be white. The red channel used here is actually near IR (845 nm) so maybe that's throwing it off slightly. It's not easy to process images like those, so they rarely end up looking just right.





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merryflipDate: Monday, 19.11.2012, 07:03 | Message # 28
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well, the topic is just too amazing, i just can't believe my eyes, thanks for you!




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SolarisDate: Tuesday, 20.11.2012, 02:49 | Message # 29
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I've just learn that the moon Triton have a atmosphere.. happy
Limb clouds over Triton's south polar cap, from voyager :
 
SpaceEngineerDate: Wednesday, 21.11.2012, 01:03 | Message # 30
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I've just learn that the moon Triton have a atmosphere..

lol. It's never late to study...





 
Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Uranus and Neptune (Anything about Sol's ice giants)
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