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Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Saturn system
Saturn system
SpaceEngineerDate: Tuesday, 02.10.2012, 19:41 | Message # 1
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Post here news and photos from Cassini mission and all other related to Saturn and its moons!




 
SpaceEngineerDate: Tuesday, 02.10.2012, 19:44 | Message # 2
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This photo is EPIC! Captured by Cassini on May 6, 2012



Link: http://www.universetoday.com/95119/a-new-angle-on-titan/

I shoud adjust surface brighness of Titan in SE smile

Attachments: 6862849.jpg(529Kb)





 
HarbingerDawnDate: Tuesday, 02.10.2012, 19:51 | Message # 3
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Quote (SpaceEngineer)
I shoud adjust surface brighness of Titan in SE

I already did it in my install smile

The channels were not aligned perfectly in that image, that is the cause of the blue edge, not atmosphere.

Here is a similar photo with good alignment:





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SolarisDate: Tuesday, 02.10.2012, 23:05 | Message # 4
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I've posted a lot of pics of saturn in the Raw Spacecraft Image Derivations thread smile

Another pic from the same day (May 6, 2012)


Some videos montages made from Cassini pics :

I love the last images on this one, simply moons orbiting.


And very few of my favs pics of the Saturnian System :

Mimas, color calibrated by Gordan Ugarkovic (2006)


Transparent rings (2009)


Dione (May 2, 2012)


Vertical structures of Saturn's B ring :


BTW, Cassini next flyby of titan is the 13 Nov 2012 smile
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Tuesday, 02.10.2012, 23:38 | Message # 5
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Quote (Solaris)
Mimas, color calibrated by Gordan Ugarkovic (2006)


Quote (Solaris)
Transparent rings (2009)

These two are beautiful! The Cassini mission was worth every bit of money spent on it happy





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DaninAusDate: Wednesday, 03.10.2012, 01:22 | Message # 6
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Quote (Solaris)
BTW, Cassini next flyby of titan is the 13 Nov 2012


Nice, that's my birthday. cool
 
WatsisnameDate: Wednesday, 03.10.2012, 01:32 | Message # 7
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Some truly amazing images, I've added several of those to my hard drive collection. happy
I really like the closeup of the rings showing their transparency. I like to try to imagine what it would be like to be an astronaut floating amidst the ring particles... from tiny ice and dust grains to giant boulders, in a region only a few meters thick but spanning over a hundred thousand kilometers, all seemingly floating motionless relative to you but collectively orbiting the planet at up to 20km/s. Would be incredible to see.

Here's a few more images:

Saturn's bluish hemisphere.


A famous one -- back-lit Saturn & rings. Earth can be seen in this photo. cool


Several moons and the ring plane.


Tethys behind Titan's atmosphere.


Ice Geysers on Enceladus.


Saturn at Equinox.


Prometheus causing a gravitational distortion in the F ring. Very cool.







Edited by Watsisname - Wednesday, 03.10.2012, 01:34
 
SolarisDate: Wednesday, 03.10.2012, 01:41 | Message # 8
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Quote (DaninAus)
Nice, that's my birthday.

Ha ! very nice, birthday present from nasa smile

Quote (Watsisname)
Saturn's bluish hemisphere.
Wonderful, one of my favs cool
Quote (Watsisname)
Prometheus causing a gravitational distortion in the F ring.
Nice one, very close up !

 
SpaceEngineerDate: Wednesday, 03.10.2012, 11:53 | Message # 9
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Quote (Watsisname)
Saturn at Equinox.

I should add the effect of lighting of rings with the planet (and lighting of the planet with rings), but I have no idea how to calculate it. There should be an easy analythic formula, I don't want to implement some hardcore techniques like radiosity.





 
AlessiaCristalloooDate: Wednesday, 03.10.2012, 14:31 | Message # 10
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Quote (SpaceEngineer)
There should be an easy analythic formula


add an ambiental light (or something similar) to ringed planets, and set to something like:
Code
( ( outer radius - inner radius ) * density * exposure ) / something


Edited by AlessiaCristallooo - Wednesday, 03.10.2012, 14:31
 
WatsisnameDate: Wednesday, 03.10.2012, 22:27 | Message # 11
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AlessiaCristallooo, Unfortunately it's a lot more complex than that. For example, brightness of the planet due to the rings is not uniform over the planet, but is a function of the latitude on the planet. The effect is zero directly under the rings (because they are thin and cross section is effectively zero) and increases with increasing latitude due to perspective. You also need to account for the portion of the rings that are shadowed by the planet, and that depends on the distance of the rings from the planet and the inclination angle of the rings relative to the sun. That's a lot of geometry going on there.

Calculating the brightness of the rings due to the planet might actually be easier. Basically it's just calculating the apparent magnitude of the planet for each point in the ring plane, which I think Space Engine already does (when near a planet, there's a display of its apparent magnitude). As far as I can figure, the apparent magnitude of the planet from a point nearby is proportional to the magnitude of the star, inverse square with the planet's distance from star, proportional to planet's albedo, proportional to apparent diameter of planet, (where apparent diameter follows
where rP is planet radius and d is distance from center),
and is also a function of sub-solar latitude (maximum when above the sub-solar point, decreases away from it and is zero when no portion of the lit-side of the planet is visible). There's some dependency on distance from the planet for the solar-latitude as well but I'm not sure how to figure that out.

And of course, a fully accurate model must do both of these simultaneously, to account for light that bounces from planet to ring and back, or vice versa. wacko

ed: Whoa, Solaris, that latest image is awesome. Took me a moment to figure out what I was looking at there. tongue
Do the rings seem to bend near the limb because of refraction through Saturn's atmosphere?

ed2: Whoops, that should be sin, not tangent.







Edited by Watsisname - Wednesday, 03.10.2012, 23:03
 
AtmoscatDate: Thursday, 04.10.2012, 01:03 | Message # 12
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
I already did it in my install


Harbinger, any chance you could tell us your new "settings" for Titan? Would love to change the values in my install too.

Thank you very much!





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HarbingerDawnDate: Thursday, 04.10.2012, 16:01 | Message # 13
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Quote (Atmoscat)
Harbinger, any chance you could tell us your new "settings" for Titan? Would love to change the values in my install too.

I changed Exposure to 0.5; this gives an appropriate relative brightness compared to Saturn.

I've been meaning to play with the atmosphere settings a bit too but I haven't gotten around to it. So you might want to experiment with that as well.





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SpaceEngineerDate: Thursday, 04.10.2012, 18:25 | Message # 14
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
I changed Exposure to 0.5; this gives an appropriate relative brightness compared to Saturn.

Well, all bodies in the Solar system should be upgraded like that. Some photos to compare brightness of various Jupiter's, Saturn's and Uranus's satellites can be found in the Internet. But maybe it is possible to make function in SE that will calculate avarage brightness of planet/moon texure and compare it with albedo form script to compute proper exposure...





 
HarbingerDawnDate: Thursday, 04.10.2012, 19:03 | Message # 15
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Quote (SpaceEngineer)
But maybe it is possible to make function in SE that will calculate avarage brightness of planet/moon texure and compare it with albedo form script to compute proper exposure...

I have been thinking the same thing. This would be the ideal solution in the long-term, especially for procedural worlds. Worlds with textures stored on the disk may need to be manually tweaked since their textures would not all have equivalent brightnesses.





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