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Forum » SpaceEngine » Science and Astronomy Discussions » Alien plants and skies on other kind of stars (Astrobiology!)
Alien plants and skies on other kind of stars
SalvoDate: Friday, 21.09.2012, 22:12 | Message # 1
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Plants in the earth are green because they absorb mostly green light, so I trought that in other planets any plant would be of a different color, because "Black Body Spectrum", for example:

- M Stars
Plants would be mostly red yellow, or even violet.

- K Stars
Similar to M Stars but with a few green.

- G Stars
Most of plants would be green like on the earth, but in autumn, for example, they could back red or yellow.

- F/A Stars
Plants could be light blue, or green, a few white.

- B/O/Wolf Rayet etc... Stars
Plants couldn't grow because the DNA as we know would be destroyed by the powerful source of gamma rays.

- Binary or multiple stars
Life is so hard to grow into binary or multiple systems, but plant would maybe absorbe black, or violet.


The color of the sky would be of any color, but if the composition of the atmosphere it's similar to earth's atmosphere it would be from orange, yellow, white, to blue, like you can see here.

So I think the life in other planets could be very very different to what we are used to see, and it's wonderful to imagine an alien landscape :Q_






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Edited by Salvo - Friday, 21.09.2012, 22:16
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Friday, 21.09.2012, 22:31 | Message # 2
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Quote (Salvo)
Plants in the earth are green because they absorb mostly green light

No, plants are green because they reflect more green light.





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SalvoDate: Friday, 21.09.2012, 22:35 | Message # 3
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
reflect
Thanks for correction wink





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SpaceEngineerDate: Friday, 21.09.2012, 23:15 | Message # 4
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Colors should be completely opposite!
The first two is of a red dwarf's biosphere (the second one is under shallow water to protect against UV flares), the third is a Sun-like yellow dwarf's, the fourth is a white star's biosphere. Blue giants and WR stars cannot biosphere, because their lifetime are just a few tens of million years.



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smjjamesDate: Saturday, 22.09.2012, 00:17 | Message # 5
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Quote (Salvo)
Life is so hard to grow into binary or multiple systems, but plant would maybe absorbe black, or violet.


We don't know that. There are about as many planets with life around them in binary and multiple star systems as there are in single star systems (actually, maybe a little more for single star systems). Sure the presence of multiple stars would make it challenging, but not too hard to grow.

If anything, a multiple star system could provide a wider range of spectrums for plant analogs to work with.

Also, I know of an article somewhere that talks about this kind of thing. I'd have to find it later.

Edit: SpaceEngineer, what article is that picture from? That may have been the article I was thinking of. Anyways, heres a bit of a link dump from Space.com

http://www.space.com/3680-colorful-worlds-plants-planets-green.html
http://www.space.com/14927-a....hs.html
http://www.space.com/11424-alien-planets-suns-black-trees.html







Edited by smjjames - Saturday, 22.09.2012, 00:32
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Saturday, 22.09.2012, 00:26 | Message # 6
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Quote (smjjames)
We don't know that. There are about as many planets with life around them in binary and multiple star systems as there are in single star systems

In SpaceEngine, yes. But this is a thread about the real world.

To quote the OP:
Quote (Salvo)
I know that a similar topic already exist, but it talks about astrobiology into Space Engine, but this is an astronomy topic





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smjjamesDate: Saturday, 22.09.2012, 00:35 | Message # 7
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
Quote (smjjames)
We don't know that. There are about as many planets with life around them in binary and multiple star systems as there are in single star systems

In SpaceEngine, yes. But this is a thread about the real world.


I was trying to make a point that while we do have an idea of the conditions, for all we know, life could evolve just as easily in a binary as it would around a single star system when the conditions are right.





 
HarbingerDawnDate: Saturday, 22.09.2012, 00:47 | Message # 8
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Quote (smjjames)
for all we know, life could evolve just as easily in a binary as it would around a single star system when the conditions are right.

And for all we know it could be much more difficult. We just don't have enough information to make any statements of certainty on the topic.





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smjjamesDate: Saturday, 22.09.2012, 01:16 | Message # 9
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
Quote (smjjames)
for all we know, life could evolve just as easily in a binary as it would around a single star system when the conditions are right.

And for all we know it could be much more difficult. We just don't have enough information to make any statements of certainty on the topic.


Which is pretty much the point I was making since the OP stated that it would be harder when we don't really know for sure.

Anyways, in one of the articles that I listed, it's unlikely that plants will be blue, although looking at the black body thing, it could appear around red dwarfs or K type stars which don't radiate much in the blue spectrum. If I'm understanding the whole thing right.

Also, I remember from that article, which I believe that image SpaceEngineer posted is from, that plants around white stars could also appear silvery.

For A class stars, they might live long enough for life to evolve, but life might not get very far before the star dies. A class stars usually only live a couple hundred million years, maybe up to a billion? Not exactly sure the maxiumum lifespan for A type stars.





 
WatsisnameDate: Saturday, 22.09.2012, 07:35 | Message # 10
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Quote (smjjames)
SpaceEngineer, what article is that picture from? That may have been the article I was thinking of.


"The Shocking Colors of Alien Plants" -- Scientific American, April 2008

Was a very interesting read. smile







Edited by Watsisname - Saturday, 22.09.2012, 07:36
 
SalvoDate: Saturday, 22.09.2012, 13:39 | Message # 11
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Quote (Watsisname)
"The Shocking Colors of Alien Plants" -- Scientific American, April 2008

Was a very interesting read. smile


I founded it before , but I've never had the pleasure to read it xD

I founded this post on a forum, could a planet orbiting a red dwarf or a white dwarf have different brightness?





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SpaceEngineerDate: Saturday, 22.09.2012, 21:00 | Message # 12
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Quote (smjjames)
Edit: SpaceEngineer, what article is that picture from?

The article is in Russian, and based on Nancy Y. Kiang's work. You may check out the links at the end of this article:
http://elementy.ru/lib/430636

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SalvoDate: Thursday, 21.02.2013, 23:47 | Message # 13
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I was boring tonight so I made this nice image, maybe colors are a bit exagerated, but i like it



It's funny to mess up with colors tryng to imagine an alien landscape biggrin





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TimDate: Friday, 22.02.2013, 07:57 | Message # 14
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Just a note, plants are just a branch of the eukaryotes that came into existance here on earth by coincidence, but at that time had a good chance of survival so that it spread and evolved all over the planet. Yet it is a small group of organisms compared to microscopic life. I highly doubt we will find plants or even animals on any alien planet. I expect something truly alien, something that evolved out of alien equivalents of eukaryotes. That doesn't mean it can't look like us, we have many beneficial traits like brains, muscles, hands etc. that would possibly be beneficial for life on any planet.
 
DoctorOfSpaceDate: Friday, 22.02.2013, 16:15 | Message # 15
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Quote (Tim)
I highly doubt we will find plants or even animals on any alien planet.


dry

Quote (Tim)
I expect something truly alien, something that evolved out of alien equivalents of eukaryotes.


That would still be an animal by definition

Even if it doesn't have DNA it would still end up classified as an animal because its overall function would be like that of an animal.





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Edited by DoctorOfSpace - Friday, 22.02.2013, 16:15
 
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