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Forum » SpaceEngine » Mods and Addons » The Space Engine Story Teller V1.3: IN-GAME READOUTS (kinda) (Generates mad-lib style histories about a planetary body.)
The Space Engine Story Teller V1.3: IN-GAME READOUTS (kinda)
sent808Date: Thursday, 28.05.2015, 21:29 | Message # 16
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Quote themohawkninja ()
Okay, version 1.2 is up, with the biggest change being an in-program story editor to make the stories a lot easier and quicker to write.

Also, you can make much larger random numbers... yay big numbers!

Plus some other stuff that you can see in the changelog/read in the post to get a better idea of.

EDIT: Also, make sure you guys have a line after the last export line in the Stories.txt file.


But excuse me. The program works great but how we get this descriptions or stories into SE?
 
mig29mDate: Saturday, 30.05.2015, 00:03 | Message # 17
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Cheers, thanks for the update!

And I'm done with my project! Here's my first crack at it, give it a look - here is my "hard" sci-fi exploration module of ridiculous complexity, which still puts out a lot of unintentially funny nonsense every once ina while biggrin

https://drive.google.com/file....sharing

Here's what a typical output for a planet with life on it might look like:

Quote
====================
Name: Lin
====================
ID: 501792930
====================

Our ship arrives at the planet Lin, having used up 10 % of its propellant capacity to decelerate and establish orbit. There are few problems encountered during the ship's journey to the planet. As the journey ends and the ship prepares to transition to planetary operations at Lin, the crew report to their stations in disagreeable spirits.

Sensor analysis of Lin from orbit triggers a red alert in the system: there are strong signs of complex life on the planet, but no chemical indicators consistent with organic life. This does not rule out inorganic life forms - but whatever organisms we encounter on this planet, they will not be life as we know it. This discovery certainly warrants further investigation.

Lin is a rocky world with a surprisingly mild temperature. Manned activity on the surface of this planet is possible and highly advised, as this planet may prove to be habitable for humans. Our instruments study Lin's landscape, which generally appears imposing when viewed from orbit. This planet possesses no intrinsic magnetosphere, much like Mars or Venus. There are no radiation belts to traverse around the planet - but this also means no protection from cosmic rays, except for a possible atmosphere (if the planet possesses one). Crew working outside the ship would receive a dose of up to 2.5 Sv/a from cosmic sources. Exploring this planet would be fatally dangerous if it does not have an atmosphere, as the cosmic radiation level alone is 50 times the occupational limit for exposure. The total radiation dose received from the planet itself and the liquids, dust and gases on its surface is up to about 6 mSv/a (2 mSv/a is Earth average). Unmanned expeditions to this planet will expend a minimum of 6 units of chemical propellant, 3 shielding panels and 2 electronics modules, and will risk an additional 6 electronics modules, 3 structural panels and 1 shielding panels should the mission fail. A manned expedition to explore this planet will cost 5 times as much, and risk the lives of 30 astronauts. An unmanned mining outpost can be established on the planet, but a manned mission is required to expand it to full capacity. Should all other factors prove favourable, this could be a very valuable world, both for scientific exploration and for mining resources. It may even prove to be habitable.

The first unmanned probe to Lin lands on a flat plain covered with fine pebbels, which turns out to be a generally disastrous landing site. The unmanned craft is able to retrieve a surface sample from Lin, a small spindle-shaped rock. The probe experiences some trouble taking off from the planet's surface, but pulls through and returns with samples for the ship's scientists. Prospects for further landings on the planet look bad .

The analysis and planning for the first manned mission to Lin's surface regards the scientific value of the expedition as imperilled . The mission is to be led by Carlina Kolz, who is considered to be a thoroughly difficult astronaut by much of the ship's crew. The main objectives of the mission are to 1) Acquire samples from the Lin's surface; 2) Explore prospective sites for resource mining; 3) Search for signs of life forms on the planet; 4) Evaluate the potential habitability of this planet; and 5) Search for bodies or subsurface reserves of consumable water . The recommended landing site for the mission is in a large flat plain on the planet's surface. The astronauts are to remain on the planet's surface for no longer than 19 days before they must depart. The surface of Lin at the landing site feels strangely syrupy to the touch. The astronauts must set off to do their exploring, keeping a particular lookout for mineral deposits of carroty appearance on the surface, which have been noted by surveys during the approach to the planet. They will also search for a mysterious wedged terrain formation that was spotted in imagery of Lin from orbit. The astronauts are in a mostly serious mindset about this expedition.

We soon discover the first signs of life on Lin's rocky surface.

There is complex life on this planet - but not life as we know it. The lifeforms which predominate here do possess a multicellular structure, but the composition of their cells is not of an organic nature - instead, analysis shows that the local fauna possess membranes made up of phosphorus, with an unusually high content of lithium in their nuclei, and use sulfuric acid as their primary solvent. The ecosystem on Lin appears to be dominated by creatures that we have named Trykolinosaurids, which could only be described as coffee cup-sized barnacles with boat-like shells. The Trykolinosaurids seem to keep away from creatures called Tserohepetae - which look a lot like great bugs of cobalt blue appearance. The predominant creatures on this planet keep away from our probes and astronauts, seemingly bothered by our presence. We may be able to capture these creatures; observing them in laboratory conditions seems like a rather typical prospect. Our observations reveal that the Trykolinosaurids to possess no signs of intelligence. Taking all necessary precautions, we are able to conduct an extensive survey of life on Lin, focusing especially on the Trykolinosaurids. Our taxonomists are able to identify and gather samples of as many as 4 subspecies of Trykolitidae, and an additional 23 species of other lifeforms. The state of the current ecosystem on Lin is desribed as good by our scientists - insofar as they can tell, anyway, as our understanding of inorganic ecology is pretty poor. We may be able to harvest the Trykolitidae. While it may be ethically questionable to interfere with and consume local life for resources, that would on the other hand provide us with as much as 8 units of each of the chemical components of their unique inorganic makeup (as above). Our astrobiologists are not entirely impressed with this idea, but operational needs are generally prioritized over philosophical considerations on our mission.

Lin's primary chemical composition: Silicon 56, Iron 17, Aluminium 11, Magnesium 6, Calcium 8, Sulfur 4, thallium 2

Constructing an unmanned mining outpost on Lin's surface will cost 8 units of chemical propellant, 9 structural panels, 5 shielding panels, and 4 electronics modules. It will produce a maximum of 19 structural panels, 54 units of silicon, 18 units of iron, 15 units of nutrients, plus no more than 5 units of chemical propellant and 4 of reactor fuel.. A manned mining station can also be established, at twice the cost; it will produce 50 percent more of each of the listed resources, and an additional 9 electronics components and 21 shielding panels. Extensive geological samples from the planet are retrieved and stored, revealing tolerable deposits of titanium and fluorine beneath the surface. No more than 5 units of each may be mined here in the course of a year.

Staying in orbit around Lin for the rest of the year, we can expect on-board resource expenditures to be fairly modest. Up to 4 units of fusion propellant and 2 units of chemical may be expended for orbital maintenance. Routine work on the ship will consume up to 1 structural panels, 4 shielding panels, 1 electronics modules. The life support system can be expected to lose up to 1 C, 8 N, 4 O, 0 H, 0 Si, 3 Fe, and 1 units of other nutrients. If a manned mining station is established, up to 2 units of nitrogen will need to be supplied to the surface to assist with life support and cooling. For the crew population, we anticipate a maximum birth rate of 2 % and a maximum natural death rate of 1 % during the year. The on-board doctors are reporting most adults on board to be in a fairly terrible state of health. The safety of our station from accidents or collisions in orbit around Lin is judged to be extraordinary. Up to 1 crew are expected to risk their lives on dangerous duties in orbit. Even with its temperate climate, working on the surface of the planet is a hazardous job, and up to 2 crew are predicted to be at risk of serious injury or death from mining activities on the surface.

Should all the other indicators about the planet's environment prove ideal (especially the gravity, atmospheric density and radiation levels), it should be possible to establish a self-sustaining colony on Lin, as it is theoretically within the habitable zone for humans. Constructing the colony to start with would require 94 structural panels, 62 shielding panels, 25 electronics modules and at least 53 units of chemical propellant. A resource stockpile of 141 nutrients (at least 10 of each major type) as well as 56 units of reactor fuel would be needed to kick-start the life support system. Most of the crew say that colonizing a planet like Lin would be a rather substandard idea, with 20 % of them being willing to live on a settlement of this kind according to polls. Perhaps in a distant future, Lin could even be terraformed.

Leaving Lin's orbit will expend 15 % of our total propellant capacity.

Lin was named in honour of Lin Bidstrup, a hard worker who campaigned against torture and abuse of political power.


Grumbling crew and shy inorganic space barnacles and all! cool

Things left to do are a LOT of cleaning up, particularly in the adjective lists; and also writing up a description for the "resource management" parts of it.
Right now you can think of those bits as "flavour text" - there's logic to them, but they're not in any way balanced. Basically the idea is that you're in command of a relatively conventional ship, powered by fusion rockets during interplanetary flight, with a large (in the hundreds-to-thousands of people) crew of potential colonists looking for a habitable world. The ship itself needs manufactured goods to function - structural panels, shielding panels, electronics modules, fusion propellant, chemical propellant, and reactor fuel. This crew is protected by a mostly-closed-cycle life support system - mostly because there is still some loss over time and it needs to be replenished with nutrients. The core nutrients are carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, silicon, iron, and a general stockpile of "other". The ship can also store various elements in bulk, and these, including the nutrients, can be converted to manufactured goods and vice versa.

But again, at the moment, it's not a "real" game mechanic and is there mostly for flavour!

See what you think - it sure is a complex bit of text.

Quick request - is it possible to increase the number of possible non-number values for variables in the same way? For randomness' sake, I've tried plugging in as big of a census data chunk in for names, but the maximum number of lines in a variable file still seems to be capped at 10,000


Edited by mig29m - Saturday, 30.05.2015, 00:04
 
themohawkninjaDate: Saturday, 30.05.2015, 01:32 | Message # 18
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Quote sent808 ()

But excuse me. The program works great but how we get this descriptions or stories into SE?


You can't at the moment. Unfortunately, from what I can tell, there doesn't seem to be a way for information to actively travel between Space Engine, and an external program (i.e. Space Engine Story Teller).

Added (30.05.2015, 01:13)
---------------------------------------------
Quote mig29m ()

Quick request - is it possible to increase the number of possible non-number values for variables in the same way? For randomness' sake, I've tried plugging in as big of a census data chunk in for names, but the maximum number of lines in a variable file still seems to be capped at 10,000


Those limits are the most odd issues that I have been having with the program, as anything past 14,481 crashes the program on startup (your apparent cap at 10,000 further increases the weirdness of it). From my research, it seems as though the limit isn't so much a constant number that I can code, so much so as it is a limit on the memory in the system. One source is telling me that it's a 2GB limit overall, whereas another says that it's 1MB per thread.

I may end up needing to use multiple storage areas (if you know anything about programming, I am using a 2D array for the variables), and coding in an algorithm to have them be used as one large storage area, since I would like to have at least 32,768 possible spots, as that fits neatly in-line with the other integer variables.

Added (30.05.2015, 01:32)
---------------------------------------------

Quote mig29m ()

And I'm done with my project! Here's my first crack at it, give it a look - here is my "hard" sci-fi exploration module of ridiculous complexity, which still puts out a lot of unintentially funny nonsense every once ina while biggrin


I took a look at the templates, and that is a very impressive amount of work you did. Using adjectives themselves as variables is a neat idea!

One thing that is worth noting though, is that the instances are unique to each story template. %Rnd1-100#0% will generate a DIFFERENT number than %Rnd1-100#0% so long as they are in two different templates, EVEN IF both templates are used. The unique instance rule only applies to like variables/ranges with like instances in the SAME story template.

Just thought you might want to know since I noticed that you had a lot of high instance numbers when for random number variables when you only had one random number variable in some of your templates.


Edited by themohawkninja - Saturday, 30.05.2015, 01:14
 
mig29mDate: Saturday, 30.05.2015, 02:52 | Message # 19
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Ah yeah, the variable instances are semi-random - I was trying to avoid accidentally repeating numbers (because I ran into it early in the process). Some of the text content would be copy-pasted into other "stories", but not always in a systematic way. But yeah, because of how much stuff there is in there, it does get pretty messy in places - hopefully I'll have a chance to sit down sometime and clean up the story and variable files a bit!

Edited by mig29m - Saturday, 30.05.2015, 02:52
 
themohawkninjaDate: Monday, 01.06.2015, 18:03 | Message # 20
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Okay, so I figured out a (somewhat clunky) way of getting the stories in-game.

Quote From description
If you want to have your stories read out to you in-game, you must paste in the directory to your Space Engine root folder before hitting "Generate Story". After that, generate the story, then go into Space Engine, open up the console, and type "run story" to have the story appear in-game. At the moment, the stories can only be shown line-by-line, but I plan to change this in the future when SpaceEngine itself allows me to do so.

There are a few issues with the in-game readouts however; don't make the "Max # of characters per line" value too large, or else Space Engine will crash, line breaks don't function (still trying to figure that one out), and list diamonds are replaced with dashes (Space Engine's scripts don't support Unicode characters as of 0.974 beta).
 
sent808Date: Monday, 01.06.2015, 18:40 | Message # 21
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But you can generate only one? Then you have to get out of the game?
 
themohawkninjaDate: Monday, 01.06.2015, 20:35 | Message # 22
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Quote sent808 ()
But you can generate only one? Then you have to get out of the game?


You don't need to exit out of the game, you just need to change the relevant parameters to match the planet in the program (i.e. temperature, type, life, habitat of life (if applicable)), and hit "Generate Story" again.

So you may need to alt+tab or minimize the game, but not exit it.
 
Stargate38Date: Sunday, 07.06.2015, 14:45 | Message # 23
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Here's one, from the extremely distant future (Type: Temperate Terra With Life (Organic Multicellular; Terrestrial/Marine)):

Quote
====================
Name: Spice Terminus
====================
ID: 000009892
====================

In 204,616,310,986 ABY, during the First Jedi Purge, the Ryn Jedi Master, Wren Honoran from Spice Terminus led an army of 204,295,295 Ryn warriors known as the Seyugi Dervishes against the Sith Lord Orgus and his army of Wookiee soldiers. After 48 days of fighting with no clear winner, Wren Honoran made a deal with the leader of the Absolutes (an up until then neutral party); Seek Ryontarr. This alliance led the Seyugi Dervishes-Absolutes alliance to victory after they overwhelmed Orgus's army 46 weeks later.

In 5164002 ABY, during the Black Sun Insurgency, the space above Spice Terminus became the site for the massive and turnpoint Second Battle of Coruscant. The battle began when the Corellian Liberal Front's fleet led by Drev Hassin was ambushed by a massive Emperor's Eye fleet of over 2010 T-65 X-wing starfighters, 354 Mere cruisers, and 49 Eclipse-class dreadnoughts. Despite desperate attempts to call in for reinforcements, a T-65 X-wing starfighter crashed into the bridge of Drev Hassin's flagship, killing him instantly. By the end of the day, over 10036 Corellian Liberal Front lives had been lost, and only a few of the Emperor's Eye ships had fallen.

Imports:

Metal ingots

High technology

Exports:

Spice

Computers

Repulsorlifts

Military hardware

Starship scrap


By then, all stars would have died, except red dwarfs, so this planet must orbit a red dwarf. What would the Galactic population be at that time?

I've attached my Stories.txt file, in case anyone wanted to use it.

Attachments: Stories.txt(12Kb)


Edited by Stargate38 - Sunday, 07.06.2015, 14:47
 
dblackDate: Thursday, 11.06.2015, 06:08 | Message # 24
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It would be a plus if windows text to speech could tell you the stories while you are flying around the planet. For some reason I like my computer to have an English accent....
 
WildOne657Date: Sunday, 14.08.2016, 01:42 | Message # 25
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Looks great!
 
GunModDate: Thursday, 25.08.2016, 13:55 | Message # 26
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Quote BlueDrache ()
I graduated high school 3 years before that.


As did I.
Us "old timers" need to stick around and show the new guys a trick or two wink
 
PlutonianEmpireDate: Tuesday, 20.09.2016, 02:02 | Message # 27
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Ok, I've added my SpaceEngine 0.98 folder to the Space Engine Root Folder box, but it says error: invalid directory. How do I fix it and get it to recognize SE 0.98? The path I entered was C:\Games\SpaceEngine 0.98 .




Specs: Dell Inspiron 5547 (Laptop); 8 gigabytes of RAM; Processor: Intel® Core™ i5-4210U CPU @ 1.70GHz (4 CPUs), ~2.4GHz; Operating System: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Graphics: Intel® HD Graphics 4400 (That's all there is :( )
 
Forum » SpaceEngine » Mods and Addons » The Space Engine Story Teller V1.3: IN-GAME READOUTS (kinda) (Generates mad-lib style histories about a planetary body.)
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