Русский New site

Advanced search

[ New messages · Forum rules · Members ]
Page 1 of 212»
Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » How do galaxies get their procedural numbers?
How do galaxies get their procedural numbers?
apenpaapDate: Tuesday, 12.06.2012, 21:14 | Message # 1
World Builder
Group: Users
Antarctica
Messages: 1063
Status: Offline
The first number in the name of every procedural object in SE is always the same for every object in a specific galaxy. Our own Milky Way has 8404 as its number, for example, as every procedural star's name here is always 'RS 8404-monkey-chicken-bakery-telescope'. So I started randomly inputting procedural names with really low galaxy numbers to see whether there would be something special about the galaxy they were in... And actually found a galaxy with number 0 :o. I found a star in it called 'RS 0-1-0-0-0' (I wonder if that's the lowest numbered star in SE? It seems likely, since I couldn't find anything starting with 'RS 0-0-~'), even.

The 0 galaxy didn't seem that special, being a random spiral galaxy, except for one thing: it was all the way on the edge of known space, with galaxies on only one side of it and only void on the other side; 171 megaparsecs from the Milky Way. So of course it seemed likely it was a case of the farthest galaxies having the lowest numbers and the Milky Way and its surrounding galaxies the highest, meaning there would most likely be 8404 galaxies in SE. This also seemed likely because a nearby bunch of dwarf galaxies had numbers 2, 3, and 4.

But as it turns out, there are galaxies even farther away in different parts of the universe. Strangely, they have numbers higher than the Milky Way, reaching above 10000. So it seems my hypothesis wasn't right. Come to think of it, I could've guessed that from the Maggelanic Clouds' 8405 and 8406 and Andromeda's 1186. But the question remains: why does a galaxy get a certain number? It can't be completely random, as neighbouring galaxies often seem to get numbers close by each other... But sometimes they're very different instead.





I occasionally stream at http://www.twitch.tv/magistermystax. Sometimes SE, sometimes other games.
 
TalismanDate: Tuesday, 12.06.2012, 22:27 | Message # 2
Pioneer
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 409
Status: Offline
That's very interesting, I'm curious to see what space engineer has to say about it. I've also inputted random numbers, some don't even work, for example if you have RS 8404-34-2-5-24-1 and you try to go to RS 8404-34-2-5-24-2 it might not exist (I haven't checked, I just made up those numbers)

Also it seems like the most luminous stars have 0-0-0 on the end of the RS code, I'll have to visit the number 0 galaxy and check it out, also do you have coordinates for the star: RS 8404-monkey-chicken-bakery-telescope? I couldn't find it. cool







Edited by Talisman - Tuesday, 12.06.2012, 22:29
 
SpaceEngineerDate: Wednesday, 13.06.2012, 15:14 | Message # 3
Author of Space Engine
Group: Administrators
Russian Federation
Messages: 4796
Status: Offline
Your discussion is very interesting, similiar to scientific research smile Do you think I should spoil it? It is interesting to see if you can find a right explanation of this smile Hint: answer is somewhere on the forum, also User Manual's Appendix can be helpful, and readme.txt that has an explanation of hotkeys that toggles the visualisation of octree cool

*





 
apenpaapDate: Wednesday, 13.06.2012, 17:11 | Message # 4
World Builder
Group: Users
Antarctica
Messages: 1063
Status: Offline
Well, I originally made the thread to get you to spoil me... But I think I'll try to figure it out myself after all. I had a look at the octree, and the fact that Andromeda is in a different block than the Milky Way at least explains why its number is so vastly different... But I haven't figured it out completely yet.




I occasionally stream at http://www.twitch.tv/magistermystax. Sometimes SE, sometimes other games.
 
apenpaapDate: Wednesday, 04.07.2012, 16:40 | Message # 5
World Builder
Group: Users
Antarctica
Messages: 1063
Status: Offline
Alright, I give up. I've tried to make sense of it, but just can't seem to figure it out beyond "every octree block contains similar numbers" which explains how galaxies get theirs on a relatively small scale.

So, how do galaxies get their procedural numbers?





I occasionally stream at http://www.twitch.tv/magistermystax. Sometimes SE, sometimes other games.
 
DisasterpieceDate: Wednesday, 31.10.2012, 02:57 | Message # 6
World Builder
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 640
Status: Offline
And the mystery continues...




I play teh spase engien
 
SpaceEngineerDate: Wednesday, 31.10.2012, 14:23 | Message # 7
Author of Space Engine
Group: Administrators
Russian Federation
Messages: 4796
Status: Offline
Quote (apenpaap)
Alright, I give up. I've tried to make sense of it, but just can't seem to figure it out beyond "every octree block contains similar numbers" which explains how galaxies get theirs on a relatively small scale. So, how do galaxies get their procedural numbers?


The galaxy ID:

RG 0-3-654662-1365

Galaxies are stored in the hierarchical space subdivision structure called the octree. This is a cube that is subdivided to 8 (thus "oct") smaller child cubes (one half of the size of the parent cube), each subdivided to an 8 child etc, a total of 10-levels. The "address" of the node in the octree is a level number (3) and a large 64-bit number (654662) that contains information of the hierarchy.

1365 - a number of a galaxy in the octree node. Every octree block node contains similar numbers numbers starting from 0 to (Number_of_galaxies_in_the_node - 1).

First 0 is a universe sector number, in 0.96 there is only one sector, thus all galaxies have this number set to 0. In future version Universe will be much bigger - simply using many 10 Gpc sectors.

The star ID:
RS 0-3-654662-1365-12-8-139764-135

First 4 numbers are the ID of the parent galaxy. The rest of numbers are defined in the same way as for the galaxy:

12 - number of galactic sector. Each sector has its own octree.

8 - level of the octree node
139764 - "address" of the octree node
135 - number of a star in the node

*





 
jacobaaronberubeDate: Monday, 07.03.2016, 01:22 | Message # 8
Observer
Group: Users
Pirate
Messages: 11
Status: Offline
I cant seem to be able to find Galaxy 8404 :/ Help
 
deejayaechDate: Saturday, 25.06.2016, 03:23 | Message # 9
Space Tourist
Group: Users
Pirate
Messages: 25
Status: Offline
Im trying to find galixies is space engion with the first number >=1 in 0.9.7.4 RC4 help plz can you even do that??!!

Edited by deejayaech - Saturday, 25.06.2016, 15:49
 
MosfetDate: Saturday, 25.06.2016, 13:10 | Message # 10
World Builder
Group: Users
Italy
Messages: 719
Status: Offline
Quote deejayaech ()
Im trying to fint galixies is space engion with the first number >=1 in 0.9.7.4 RC4 help plz can you even do that??!!


Last published version is 0.9.7.4 RC3, I think you're referring to that one.

No, you can't find galaxies with first number other than 0 (for now). In future versions will be possible.
http://en.spaceengine.org/forum/11-646-14074-16-1351689813





"Time is illusion. Lunchtime doubly so."
Douglas N. Adams
My mods
Asus x555ub: cpu i5-6200u - ram 4gb - gpu nvidia geforce 940m 2gb vram
 
deejayaechDate: Saturday, 25.06.2016, 14:30 | Message # 11
Space Tourist
Group: Users
Pirate
Messages: 25
Status: Offline
biggrin thanks

Edited by deejayaech - Saturday, 25.06.2016, 15:05
 
AlekDate: Sunday, 26.06.2016, 02:10 | Message # 12
Pioneer
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 319
Status: Offline
Quote deejayaech ()
RC4


You must be from the future...tell us, what is it like?





Living among the stars, I find my way. I grow in strength through knowledge of the space I occupy, until I become the ruler of my own interstellar empire of sorts. Though The world was made for the day, I was made for the night, and thus, the universe itself is within my destiny.
 
HanakofuroshiraDate: Monday, 11.07.2016, 01:19 | Message # 13
Astronaut
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 42
Status: Offline
I cannot get the octree levels to show up at all. I even looked into my .cfg files and made sure I was pressing the right keys...

Do I have to zoom away a bit and then press ctrl-y to see the stellar octree? If so, that doesn't work for me. I even tried y-ctrl and y to see if anything would happen, but to no avail. Is there just something silly I'm missing?





Fluent in music, math, Solresol, and hopefully someday, astronomy.
 
JackDoleDate: Monday, 11.07.2016, 07:27 | Message # 14
Star Engineer
Group: Local Moderators
Germany
Messages: 1737
Status: Offline
Quote Hanakofuroshira ()
I cannot get the octree levels to show up at all. I even looked into my .cfg files and made sure I was pressing the right keys...

Octrees appear only in the Debug mode. To get into the Debug mode, press '*' on the numeric keypad.
Back to normal mode with twice '*'!





Don't forget to look here.

 
HanakofuroshiraDate: Monday, 11.07.2016, 18:01 | Message # 15
Astronaut
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 42
Status: Offline
Ah thank you! It took me a few minutes to actually find the key on my numpad block. I should've looked closer at the .cfg files to see that.

Haha, you should've warned me about how much information was on the screen! I nearly choked on my water haha. With edit mode, is it essentially like how you go to the main menu and edit the body parameters? Sorry for the lot of questions.





Fluent in music, math, Solresol, and hopefully someday, astronomy.
 
Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » How do galaxies get their procedural numbers?
Page 1 of 212»
Search: