Русский New site

Advanced search

[ New messages · Forum rules · Members ]
Page 1 of 11
Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » Telescopes for observing deep-sky objects
Telescopes for observing deep-sky objects
StrangerDate: Tuesday, 02.06.2015, 12:40 | Message # 1
Observer
Group: Newbies
United States
Messages: 2
Status: Offline
Hello guys! Can you recommend the telescope that is the best for observing deep-sky objects. I have read a lot of reviews and it says that that Orion and Levenhuk telescopes are fine for it plus the price is very attractive. Is it true? Write plz your own ideas
Thank you
 
AlekDate: Wednesday, 03.06.2015, 07:19 | Message # 2
Pioneer
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 318
Status: Offline
I have a really nice Orion, and I was easily able to see the Andromeda in great detail, but it really has to do with the lenses you buy, and the size of the telescope.

Also, I believe this goes in the Off-topic subforum, or possibly the Astronomy subforum.





Living among the stars, I find my way. I grow in strength through knowledge of the space I occupy, until I become the ruler of my own interstellar empire of sorts. Though The world was made for the day, I was made for the night, and thus, the universe itself is within my destiny.
 
WatsisnameDate: Wednesday, 03.06.2015, 07:37 | Message # 3
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 2607
Status: Offline
Are you primarily going to be doing visual observing, or are you interested in trying astrophotography? Is portability a big issue? Do you care about having to do regular collimation? What kind of mount do you want? What is your price range? How much aperture do you need before cost/weight gets too high?

These are the kinds of questions you should be asking yourself. Not which manufacturer is 'best' -- that's probably the least important factor for you right now. But we can help you determine what telescope types and features are best for what you want to do. smile

If you're interested in the best light-gathering power for the buck (ideal for visual observing of DSO's), then I suggesting looking to Dobsonians. I don't own one, but they are very popular at the star parties, and the people who do own them swear by them. They have by far the highest aperture-to-dollar ratio since they are basically nothing more than a gigantic mirror in a tube. Views of open clusters and globulars are especially fantastic through them.

Also -- and I assume you know this, but want to say it just in case you don't so you don't waste hundreds or thousands of dollars -- with DSO's, it does not matter how good your telescope is if you're observing from a light polluted sky. Unless you live in the middle of nowhere, expect to have to travel, perhaps for hours, to get to a sufficiently dark sky to appreciate them from. You should also know that no telescope is going to make you see galaxies and nebula like they appear in Hubble images and the like. Those are extremely long exposures with a lot of computer processing. Your eyes will not see detail and colors like that. Most nebulae look essentially colorless and fuzzy to the eye, even through a large scope.

You can produce amazing images like that yourself, and this is the art of astrophotography, but it generally requires a lot of money and work, and if you are interested in going that route than it will definitely affect your considerations for what type of telescope you should get. smile





 
StrangerDate: Wednesday, 03.06.2015, 14:10 | Message # 4
Observer
Group: Newbies
United States
Messages: 2
Status: Offline
I want a portable one, for 150-200 $. I wanna visual observing
 
BambusmanDate: Wednesday, 03.06.2015, 15:42 | Message # 5
Pioneer
Group: SE team
Germany
Messages: 408
Status: Offline
Stranger, for a cheap deep sky telescope i would recommend the gso dobson 200c.
 
WatsisnameDate: Thursday, 04.06.2015, 00:50 | Message # 6
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 2607
Status: Offline
Quote Stranger ()
I want a portable one, for 150-200 $. I wanna visual observing


For $200 you're probably limited to under 100mm of aperture. But, if you want to do visual observing of deep-sky objects, that's pretty low. You could see the Moon and planets just fine, but galaxies and nebulae are a lot fainter, and you need as much light-gathering power as you can get to see them well. Light gathering power grows as the square of the telescope's aperture diameter, so a little bit more money spent will improve your view dramatically. I'd definitely suggest aiming for something with at least 100mm, or 4 inches, diameter.

Bambusman's suggestion of the GSO Dobson 200c is a good one.





 
Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » Telescopes for observing deep-sky objects
Page 1 of 11
Search: