Русский New site

Advanced search

[ New messages · Forum rules · Members ]
Page 1 of 11
Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » Question on programming on a universe scale (Programming question)
Question on programming on a universe scale
AvanakDate: Saturday, 28.03.2015, 09:04 | Message # 1
Observer
Group: Newbies
Netherlands
Messages: 8
Status: Offline
Sorry if this is an inappropriate forum section, but I didn't know where else to post it.

I am creating a space game in Unity3D and I have some questions regarding scale. I wonder how space engine manages to deal with scale. In Unity3D you work with world coordinates to set the positions for your objects, but on the scale of the universe, you quickly run out of space (literally).

I wonder how SE deals with scale in programming and how it can load so many stars and galaxies at once.


Edited by Avanak - Saturday, 28.03.2015, 14:35
 
shamokeDate: Monday, 11.05.2015, 17:47 | Message # 2
Observer
Group: Newbies
United States
Messages: 2
Status: Offline
The "world space" is probably procedurally generated each time you move your camera or selected object. There's no way you can store the entire universe in memory so you should go for a "local" approach.
 
BlueDracheDate: Tuesday, 12.05.2015, 01:01 | Message # 3
Space Pilot
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 87
Status: Offline
Quote shamoke ()
The "world space" is probably procedurally generated each time you move your camera or selected object. There's no way you can store the entire universe in memory so you should go for a "local" approach.


I would tend to agree, but the "local" approach changes with scale. For example, inside a galaxy or globular, local is procedurally within visible magnatude (7 or lower). If you Shift+F3 and search within ... say 75 light years, you'll get a whole host of stars that should give your system a "hiccup" while it generates all the procedural items, even the ones you couldn't see (7.x and higher).

Outside of a galaxy, I've noticed that space-engine will populate the background to look like the local galactic group (not of stars, but of galaxies), with a background that's complete with intergalactic voids and superclusters of galaxies that looks similar (to my untrained eye) to the theoretical grouping of the CMBR imprint.

Now, one doesn't *have* to get this scientifically accurate, but even in intergalactic space, say we have a single star system by itself in the middle of nowhere, galaxies and galactic groups will form discernible patterns according to how plasma cools.

Most people who play a game though aren't in it for the scientific accuracy.


Edited by BlueDrache - Tuesday, 12.05.2015, 01:02
 
AlekDate: Tuesday, 12.05.2015, 01:12 | Message # 4
Pioneer
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 318
Status: Offline
BlueDrache, I've noticed that Space Engine does to a certain extent simulate the groupings of galaxies the way they really would be, it's just more random than it really should be. There are no filliments and not really any true voids either, just w whole lot of randomly placed Galaxies...




Living among the stars, I find my way. I grow in strength through knowledge of the space I occupy, until I become the ruler of my own interstellar empire of sorts. Though The world was made for the day, I was made for the night, and thus, the universe itself is within my destiny.
 
WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 12.05.2015, 05:55 | Message # 5
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 2604
Status: Offline
Quote Alek ()
There are no filliments and not really any true voids either, just w whole lot of randomly placed Galaxies...


SE does show the large scale structure of galaxies with proper filaments and voids (though the distribution could be more realistic). The structure is not immediately obvious unless you fly at high speed and watch the relative density of galaxies around you (voids appear as long stretches of essentially nothingness), or increase the galaxy magnitude limit a lot (I recommend 17 to see it well).

You just have to realize that filaments and voids are a lot harder to discern in three dimensions from within (especially in true scale and brightness) than it is in a 2D slice as in most illustrative images.





 
Destructor1701Date: Tuesday, 12.05.2015, 22:55 | Message # 6
Pioneer
Group: Users
Ireland
Messages: 531
Status: Offline





 
Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » Question on programming on a universe scale (Programming question)
Page 1 of 11
Search: