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Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » Velocities and their values + comparisons (converting the velocities into comparable figures.)
Velocities and their values + comparisons
wahchewieDate: Wednesday, 12.02.2014, 09:21 | Message # 1
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Hello all,

Would first just like to express my absolute elation that for the first time recently, computing power has finally gotten to such that this kind of software is now possible. We are now playing with (for free) what Issac Newton could only fantasise about.

Now, Velocities. Help me please.

Km/s, is obvious.

What is... a 'c' per second (somewhere around 85,000 km/s ?

What is.... an 'AU' per second

What is.... a 'pc' per second?

Also, had a quick look around wikipedia etc, for interest i was trying to find a reasonable figure for what 'warp' velocity would be in star trek or similar sci fi situations. Would be interested to compare what I'm doing in space engine compared to sci fi.

Finally, if the speed of light is approximately 300,000 km/s, thats got to be somewhere in the vicinity of 1-2 'c' right?

Agh, i give up.

Your input appreciated, Cheers biggrin
 
HaintedDate: Wednesday, 12.02.2014, 11:48 | Message # 2
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AU is Astronomical Unit, which is the distance from the sun to the Earth, if I remember right.
 
apenpaapDate: Wednesday, 12.02.2014, 13:36 | Message # 3
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c is light speed, so 300 million m/s. An AU is an Astronomic Unit, the distance from Earth to the Sun (150 million km). A pc is a parsec; 3,3 light years or 31 Petametres. If you go fast and far enough you'll encounter kiloparsecs, megaparsecs, and gigaparsecs too.

Added (12.02.2014, 16:36)
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Quote wahchewie ()
Also, had a quick look around wikipedia etc, for interest i was trying to find a reasonable figure for what 'warp' velocity would be in star trek or similar sci fi situations. Would be interested to compare what I'm doing in space engine compared to sci fi.


Officially, warp 1 is light speed, warp 2 8c, warp 3 27c, warp 4 64c, etc. The speed in light speeds is the cube of the warp factor. Except that in TNG, it was change to be asymptotic, so that above warp 9 the speed rises faster and faster until at warp 10 everyone becomes lizards.





I occasionally stream at http://www.twitch.tv/magistermystax. Sometimes SE, sometimes other games.
 
DoctorOfSpaceDate: Wednesday, 12.02.2014, 14:31 | Message # 4
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Quote apenpaap ()
warp 2 8c


Couple of sites I know of, though warp speed is so random and silly it doesn't even matter.

http://www.ksfcn.com/tlhInganQummem/Qwarp_calculator.htm
http://www.lcarscom.net/warp02.htm

Though it is mentioned in I think Enterprise and a few other sources that it is 8c.

Quote apenpaap ()
until at warp 10 everyone becomes lizards.


We don't talk about this.





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wahchewieDate: Thursday, 13.02.2014, 07:36 | Message # 5
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Thanks very much for sharing yer' knowledge biggrin

So, the 'C' values... that threw me a bit initially, the speed of light being 1c, because it became apparent, that even if you travel at that speed.... you are getting absolutely freaking nowhere hehe.

An 'AU' , great, easy to understand. I am suprised it doesn't conform with the kilometer scale in any way. Its like the old imperial vs metric argument. I will begrudginly accept however, that it makes judging distance of the other planets in our own solar system easier.

a 'Parsec' ok, more difficult. So it doesn't conform to any of the other measurements in any way, but it is essentially 3.3 light years per second, got it.

Petition.. stuff the system! Instead of making another mess of a measurement system (I'm looking at you, Imperial) Lets beat up the physicists until they make a simple system that sticks to something uniform, like the speed of light, for example 1c, 1kc, 1gc & so on.

Finally, thanks for the trek references, that's simply because i wanted to see compare what it looks like. They've never claimed any realism so we can't beat up on them, but certainly they wouldn't have stars streaking past them on the view monitor like in the shows, huh? happy

Thats my curiosity satisfied, thank you!


Edited by wahchewie - Saturday, 15.02.2014, 11:15
 
DoctorOfSpaceDate: Thursday, 13.02.2014, 08:08 | Message # 6
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Quote wahchewie ()
you are getting absolutely freaking nowhere hehe.


If you consider the speed in SpaceEngine which has no relativistic effects, then yes.

However if you could drop your mass to zero and go the speed of light, time from your viewpoint would "stop".
Quote
The standard equation for "time dilation" is that the time passing on Earth will equal the time on the object * 1/sqrt(1-((v*v)/(c*c))), where v is the velocity of the object and c is the speed of light. At v=c this goes to infinity, or in other words, time would stop for an object moving at the speed of light


This basically means from your perspective you would instantly go from Earth to Alpha Centauri but to everyone else it would have taken you 4.3 years.

Quote wahchewie ()
F--- the system!


Please read the forum rules

Quote Robbie ()
Usage of profane or abusive words is strictly prohibited, no matter in what form and to whom they are addressed. It concerns substitution of letters by characters as well.


Quote wahchewie ()
but certainly they wouldn't have stars streaking past them on the view monitor like in the shows, huh?


No they wouldn't. The speed to see stars streaking by is far higher than what the warp scale allows, not counting Warp 10.

In reality if they had a real warp drive then looking outside the windows of the ship you would be greeted by a very bland blobby sight. Space would be compressed in front and expanded behind the ship. If you did look towards the front of the bubble where space was being compressed you would most likely see something along the lines of a bright blue blob because of the light coming toward you(BLUESHIFT). Behind the ship would be a heavily distorted reddish blob due to the light being pushed away from you(REDSHIFT). If you could go fast enough then looking out the sides/bottom/top you might see stars streaking by.



http://www.icarusinterstellar.org/what-wo....p-speed





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wahchewieDate: Saturday, 15.02.2014, 11:15 | Message # 7
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Thanks for taking the time to explain, apologies, i didn't mean to break the forum rules.

I'm enjoying putting perspective on the knowledge that most of us learned as kids, but its very different when it's actually put infront of you in 3d. It's great.

Yes, so i should have remembered the whole distortion at speed thing that renders the visuals of star trek impossible anyway, that you would just see the bright blue blob. I do remember seeing a video on this recently. That being said; its a tv show, so its innacuracies are fine with me.

Ultimately it seems to get across the milky way we need to be in the parsec kind of speeds. Considering the light barrier seems to be a problem, i can't see this happening in a hurry. Perhaps we'll end up having to eat spice and fold space instead.
 
apenpaapDate: Saturday, 15.02.2014, 11:58 | Message # 8
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Quote wahchewie ()
An 'AU' , great, easy to understand. I am suprised it doesn't conform with the kilometer scale in any way. Its like the old imperial vs metric argument. I will begrudginly accept however, that it makes judging distance of the other planets in our own solar system easier.


Yeah, I'm not very fond of AUs myself and prefer distances in (millions of) km in space. One day SE will let you choose what unit things are displayed in.

Quote
a 'Parsec' ok, more difficult. So it doesn't conform to any of the other measurements in any way, but it is essentially 3.3 light years per second, got it.


Yeah, it seems very weird at first glance, but the reason it's used is that it's basically a unit for translating paralax into distance. Viewed from one parsec distance, the Earth orbit has an angular diameter of a single arcsecond. Which means from our point of view, things at that distance have a yearly paralax of one arcsecond, things at 2 pc have half an arcsecond paralax, etc.





I occasionally stream at http://www.twitch.tv/magistermystax. Sometimes SE, sometimes other games.
 
Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » Velocities and their values + comparisons (converting the velocities into comparable figures.)
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