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Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » How many celestial bodies are there in SE?
How many celestial bodies are there in SE?
CesrateDate: Thursday, 16.01.2014, 11:56 | Message # 1
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Well, approximately?
 
QuontexDate: Thursday, 16.01.2014, 13:00 | Message # 2
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More than all the atoms in the solar system, at least.




 
CesrateDate: Thursday, 16.01.2014, 15:09 | Message # 3
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Are them about 10^22?
 
Fireinthehole-Date: Thursday, 16.01.2014, 16:07 | Message # 4
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Quote Cesrate ()
Are them about 10^22?

That's the amount of stars in the known universe. I can't tell if Space Engine is that realistic, but if so, and if each star has about 7 planets, and 1000 comets and just as many asteroids, and each planet has 5 moons, then we talk big numbers.





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WatsisnameDate: Friday, 17.01.2014, 04:07 | Message # 5
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Quote Quontex ()
More than all the atoms in the solar system, at least.


This is the fun thing about huge numbers; it's really truly difficult to appreciate the difference in scale between them. Let's look at the number of atoms in the solar system first. Most (~99%) of the mass in the solar system lies in the sun (~2x1030kg), which is mostly hydrogen and helium (average molar mass ~1.27). This gives ~1057 atoms total. That is a lot.

The number if objects in SE is also 'a lot'. But is it comparable to the above? We could estimate it by multiplying the total number of galaxies by the average number of stars per galaxy by the average number of objects per star. Ideally we'd want to count non-stellar systems as well (brown dwarfs, black holes, globular clusters, etc), but for the sake of simplicity let's ignore these.

For the first value, according to SpaceEngineer there are ~10 galaxies per Mpc3, which with the 10x10x10 Gpc cubic SE universe gives 1013 galaxies in total. I've no idea what the other values might be, but if we generously assume one trillion stars per galaxy and 100,000 objects per star, that's still 'only' 1030 objects in all. So we're short by about 27 powers of ten if we want to compare to the number of atoms in the solar system.

Conclusion: The universe, even the SE one, is very big. But atoms are very very small.





 
VinnyDate: Friday, 17.01.2014, 08:41 | Message # 6
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Hi, guys!

That is a very good question! My guess is the number of celestial bodies in SE is about 1x57 or about 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 celestial bodies grand total in the SE universe!!! Question for you, how do I write the powers of 10 like for example 10 with a small 57? Thanks!

Cheers,
Vincent
 
DoctorOfSpaceDate: Friday, 17.01.2014, 08:45 | Message # 7
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Quote Vinny ()
Question for you, how do I write the powers of 10 like for example 10 with a small 57? Thanks!


10⁵⁷





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midtskogenDate: Friday, 17.01.2014, 09:52 | Message # 8
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Quote Vinny ()
My guess is the number of celestial bodies in SE is about 1x57

Assuming you mean 10^57, how did you arrive at that number?

If you actually mean 57 bodies as you write, I think that's a much closer estimate than 10^57 which is a lot. smile





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VinnyDate: Friday, 17.01.2014, 10:14 | Message # 9
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Hi, Midtskogen!

No, I did not mean 57 celestial bodies, I meant 1 followed by 57 zeros which is 1 octodecillion celestial bodies counting all the planets, stars, moons in the SE universe.
 
apenpaapDate: Friday, 17.01.2014, 10:21 | Message # 10
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How do you get to that number? If each galaxy contains 10^11 stars and each Solar System a billion bodies, there would need to be 10^37 galaxies. If you try to fit those into the 10 GPC SE universe, you get an average distance of about 10 billion km between the galaxies. Which seems a little tighter packed than they really are.





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Edited by apenpaap - Friday, 17.01.2014, 10:24
 
midtskogenDate: Friday, 17.01.2014, 11:45 | Message # 11
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The universe is empty. Very empty. Since the SE universe is a 10x10x10 Gpc cube, 10^57 objects means one object in a nPc cube if evenly distributed, or a cube with sides 30,000 km. Unless you count every dust particle there is as a celestial body, that universe would be very packed.




NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
RockoRocksDate: Friday, 17.01.2014, 17:46 | Message # 12
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Quote DoctorOfSpace ()
10⁵⁷

or you just use the [sup][/sup] tags.





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WatsisnameDate: Friday, 17.01.2014, 21:06 | Message # 13
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Quote midtskogen ()
If you actually mean 57 bodies as you write, I think that's a much closer estimate than 10^57 which is a lot.


Yes, 57 and 1057 are almost equally inaccurate. smile





 
midtskogenDate: Saturday, 18.01.2014, 07:55 | Message # 14
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I would say that 57 is way more accurate than 1057 since if you take 1057 minus the actual number and round up to the nearest power of ten, you still get 1057, while if you take the actual number minus 57 and round up to a power of ten again, you get a much much smaller number than 1057. wink




NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
Fireinthehole-Date: Saturday, 18.01.2014, 14:39 | Message # 15
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Quote midtskogen ()
I would say that 57 is way more accurate than 1057 since if you take 1057 minus the actual number and round up to the nearest power of ten, you still get 1057, while if you take the actual number minus 57 and round up to a power of ten again, you get a much much smaller number than 1057.

Just like 10 (101) is closer to 1 (100) than 100 (102).





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