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Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » Learning to pilot a ship - tutorial?
Learning to pilot a ship - tutorial?
HarbingerDawnDate: Tuesday, 07.01.2014, 15:38 | Message # 16
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Forced means it stays in that mode until you change it. Auto means it switches automatically. In this version, you're better off using forced.




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IrigiDate: Wednesday, 08.01.2014, 13:50 | Message # 17
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Currenly, I have lots of trouble with the fact, that in the ship control mode, the reference body is always set to be the closest one (so it seems). For example when I am trying to establish orbit around Earth-like planet with five small moons, it always tells me I am on escape trajectory (peri = -apo, P = 0, a = 0) from some of the planets's moons. It would be very helpful if the reference body would be based on the spheres of influence, not just the distance.

Also, I encountered this strange behavior: When I teleport the ship near the planet, it starts free fall to its surface. When I click "prograde", the ship orients itself towards the reference moon and ignores the planet completely. Sometimes the ship even gains some velocity in that direction, although the engines are off and I am in the Force simulation mode. Why would the ship orientation change also change the velocity? (Numerical error, or I just overlooked that the velocity change was due to reference-body switch to another moon?)
 
TunaOfSpaceDate: Sunday, 12.01.2014, 00:44 | Message # 18
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Quote Irigi ()
Also, I encountered this strange behavior: When I teleport the ship near the planet, it starts free fall to its surface. When I click "prograde", the ship orients itself towards the reference moon and ignores the planet completely. Sometimes the ship even gains some velocity in that direction, although the engines are off and I am in the Force simulation mode. Why would the ship orientation change also change the velocity? (Numerical error, or I just overlooked that the velocity change was due to reference-body switch to another moon?)


If the ship orients to prograde in the direction of the moon, you're most likely in the moon's sphere of influence and thus falling toward the moon faster than the planet itself. This would be the case if you started with zero orbital velocity and the moon was already approaching you by virtue of its orbital velocity relative to the planet, which would impart more gravitation on you over time as you both approached each other.
 
UrthmanDate: Tuesday, 18.02.2014, 06:37 | Message # 19
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Is there a reference anywhere that explains the various elements in the orbital HUD? I'm particularly curious about:

What is the difference between the "Main Engines" the "Hover Engines" and the "Thrusters"?

What do the numbers in the orbital parameters mean (P, a, peri, apo, e, i, capital Omega, lowercase Omega, M0)?

What are the 3 velocities (V, V1, V2) in the upper middle right (below the directonal indicator for the reference body)?

What is the significance of the two targets (one is a circle with a dot, the other is a circle with an x in it, both of them have a constantly updating speed associated with them)?
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Tuesday, 18.02.2014, 07:16 | Message # 20
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Quote Urthman ()
What is the difference between the "Main Engines" the "Hover Engines" and the "Thrusters"?

The names are self-explanatory. Main engines accelerate you forward, and are controlled with the mouse wheel. Hover engines accelerate you upward and are controlled with Ctrl-mouse wheel. Thrusters push you in any direction using the WASDRF keys.

Quote Urthman ()
What do the numbers in the orbital parameters mean

Go to Wikipedia and read about orbital elements.

Quote Urthman ()
What are the 3 velocities (V, V1, V2)

V is current velocity, V1 is velocity needed for a circular orbit at your current altitude, V2 is escape velocity.

Quote Urthman ()
What is the significance of the two targets (one is a circle with a dot, the other is a circle with an x in it, both of them have a constantly updating speed associated with them)?

Dot shows the direction you're moving in, X shows the opposite direction. In technical terms, they're called your prograde and retrograde velocity vectors.





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UrthmanDate: Tuesday, 18.02.2014, 10:45 | Message # 21
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Quote HarbingerDawn ()
What is the difference between the "Main Engines" the "Hover Engines" and the "Thrusters"?

The names are self-explanatory. Main engines accelerate you forward, and are controlled with the mouse wheel. Hover engines accelerate you upward and are controlled with Ctrl-mouse wheel. Thrusters push you in any direction using the WASDRF keys.


Thanks, I wish they were self-explanatory. So, do the main engines and hover engines just do the same thing as holding the W key or the R key (except without having to hold the key)?

Thanks for the help with the other questions. I guess my real question about the orbital parameters is what (if anything) you're supposed to use that information for when flying. The apo- and peri- numbers help to show if your attempted orbit is going to crash or escape, and I guess the prograde and retrograde velocity vector targets show you what directions to accelerate in order to help stabilize your orbit, but are the other numbers useful for anything when you're flying? Or are they more just interesting extra details about the shape of your orbit?
 
SpaceEngineerDate: Tuesday, 18.02.2014, 19:06 | Message # 22
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Quote Urthman ()
Thanks, I wish they were self-explanatory. So, do the main engines and hover engines just do the same thing as holding the W key or the R key (except without having to hold the key)?

No, they have much bigger thrust.

Quote Urthman ()
Thanks for the help with the other questions. I guess my real question about the orbital parameters is what (if anything) you're supposed to use that information for when flying. The apo- and peri- numbers help to show if your attempted orbit is going to crash or escape, and I guess the prograde and retrograde velocity vector targets show you what directions to accelerate in order to help stabilize your orbit, but are the other numbers useful for anything when you're flying? Or are they more just interesting extra details about the shape of your orbit?

They will be useful in future, to help synchronize your orbit with orbit of a space station or another ship.





 
SkiminoHarmonDate: Sunday, 23.02.2014, 05:46 | Message # 23
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I think ship piloting should be simplified. The beauty of this software is how easy it is to explore the universe and the amount of content within it. Ship piloting should also be simple. Get in and go.
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Sunday, 23.02.2014, 08:58 | Message # 24
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Ships are still an alpha feature. They're not even fully functional. Implementing automated flight assistance would require a lot more development. Anyway, the beauty of SE is also realism, and flying in space with realistic physics is, while not overly complicated, certainly a lot harder and complex than flying an airplane.




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SCDate: Monday, 21.04.2014, 03:48 | Message # 25
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Yeah, a video of how to orbit would certainly help!
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Monday, 21.04.2014, 03:58 | Message # 26
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Quote SC ()
Yeah, a video of how to orbit would certainly help!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oz-h7y4lPI0





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SCDate: Tuesday, 22.04.2014, 01:49 | Message # 27
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A youtube tutorial on ships and how to achieve orbit would be awesome!
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Tuesday, 22.04.2014, 02:09 | Message # 28
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Quote SC ()
A youtube tutorial on ships and how to achieve orbit would be awesome!

The video I just linked does a decent job of explaining orbits...





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SCDate: Tuesday, 22.04.2014, 07:35 | Message # 29
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Quote HarbingerDawn ()
The video I just linked does a decent job of explaining orbits...


I saw that one. Maybe it is just me but still don't get it.


Edited by SC - Tuesday, 22.04.2014, 07:37
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Tuesday, 22.04.2014, 16:35 | Message # 30
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Quote SC ()
I saw that one. Maybe it is just me but still don't get it.

There must be some videos on Youtube explaining basic orbital mechanics, since it seems that that's what you're having trouble with. Try searching for that.





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Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » Learning to pilot a ship - tutorial?
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