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Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » Hyper giant Stars
Hyper giant Stars
PlanetExplorer12Date: Saturday, 09.03.2013, 22:37 | Message # 1
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How do i find hyper giant stars easily? I have been playing the game for over 5 hours and have only found one. I also found a super giant star.




Jupiter is Awesome!
 
osterizer8Date: Sunday, 10.03.2013, 03:16 | Message # 2
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There are two hypergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud. They are the only stars easily visible from the outside of the galaxy.
 
PlanetExplorer12Date: Sunday, 10.03.2013, 03:19 | Message # 3
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so there's only catalog hypergiant stars?




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osterizer8Date: Sunday, 10.03.2013, 03:23 | Message # 4
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Those are the only two that I know of. There may be procedural hypergiants, but if there are, I would expect them to be very rare.
 
Joey_PenguinDate: Sunday, 10.03.2013, 20:22 | Message # 5
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Because of the sheer mass needed to make a hypergiant (around 100 solar masses), along with their lifespan of just a few million years, they would be among the rarest stars out there.




Careful. The PLATT Collective has spurs.

Edited by Joey_Penguin - Sunday, 10.03.2013, 20:24
 
n3xtDate: Sunday, 10.03.2013, 22:20 | Message # 6
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Joey Penguin
Quote
Because of the sheer mass needed to make a hypergiant (around 100 solar masses), along with their lifespan of just a few million years, they would be among the rarest stars out there.


That's funny more or less because hypergiants aren't really based on luminosities but rather on their diameters.

For example a 100 Solar mass star would likely be refered as luminosity class Ia-0 (extremely luminous supergiants).
They're also commonly known as LBV's (luminous blue variables) like the Eta Carinae or the Pistol Star.

That's due to their tremendous brightness but their relatively ''small'' diameters.

A hypergiant is based on diameters and therefore even a class Ia / Iab / Ib could be refered as that and would have a mass of atleast 20 - 25 Solar masses.

Interesting note: the yellow-white hypergiant Rho Cassiopeae actually zig-zag crosses the ''yellow hypergiant'' region in the HR diagram as fast as 50.000 - 100.000 years (probably less) ...

Oh well biggrin


Edited by n3xt - Sunday, 10.03.2013, 22:22
 
PlanetExplorer12Date: Sunday, 10.03.2013, 22:46 | Message # 7
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I just found a random red supergiant here, so there might be random hypergiants:
Place "Supergiant red"
{
Body "RS 0-1-7-275-21650-0-0-0 B"
Parent ""
Pos (-6.424503899308756e-005, 1.730299630643077e-006, -5.447983112915423e-005)
Rot (-0.4175516312245632, -0.08006051303603975, 0.9038271137105243, 0.04834767870141678)
Date "2012.07.06 19:24:23.31"
Vel 8.4252424e-006
Mode 1
}
There's also a scorched desert orbiting it at the tempurature 1500 K





Jupiter is Awesome!

Edited by PlanetExplorer12 - Sunday, 10.03.2013, 22:47
 
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