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Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » Question about tidally locked planets
Question about tidally locked planets
NeapolitanBoyDate: Friday, 05.10.2012, 13:26 | Message # 16
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
NeapolitanBoy, you have already discussed this planet here, there is no reason to create a new thread about it. If you think it is a bug that should be fixed, post it in the bug reports thread.


Ok, so I am reporting it in the bug reports thread.
 
NeapolitanBoyDate: Thursday, 11.10.2012, 16:05 | Message # 17
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I'd have a pair of questions.

We have just said that the tidally locked planet which is the protagonist of this thread has water where it should have boiled (because the software, if I have understood correctly, doesn't generate planet surfaces based on all physical principles). So:

1) At the moment, what physical parameters are kept into account when generating planet surfaces? For example, are the ice cap dimensions influenced by the mean temperature and by the axial tilt?

2) Do you think that a lot of time is needed to have a SE where the aspect of the planets is strongly influenced by physics?

Thak you.
 
SpaceEngineerDate: Thursday, 11.10.2012, 17:43 | Message # 18
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Quote (NeapolitanBoy)
1) At the moment, what physical parameters are kept into account when generating planet surfaces? For example, are the ice cap dimensions influenced by the mean temperature and by the axial tilt?

Yes. Such obvious influences are implemented, but they do not use real scientific formulae, just simple approximation, to make it work. Huge research is needed to make the formulae more realistic. And of course science doesn't have a precise formulae to compute climate, meteorology is very complex science.

*





 
NeapolitanBoyDate: Friday, 12.10.2012, 08:24 | Message # 19
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Quote (SpaceEngineer)
Yes. Such obvious influences are implemented, but they do not use real scientific formulae, just simple approximation, to make it work. Huge research is needed to make the formulae more realistic. And of course science doesn't have a precise formulae to compute climate, meteorology is very complex science.


Thank you very much for your reply, SpaceEngineer. You are very busy but gave me a reply: I appreciate it.
Yes, you are right. An astronomer once told me that metereology of a planet is something impossible to foresee, to the point that creating it purely by fantasy often produces results as plausible as the ones produced by scientific suppositions.

Probably there could be an easy way to implement a little more realism: what about a formula which takes into account atmospheric pressure, boiling point of water and latitude (longitude in tidally locked planets) to establish if in ccertain areas liquid water should be graphically generated or not?
Similar elements could be useful for creating snow on mountains too.
smile

With this said, thank you again!
 
NeapolitanBoyDate: Thursday, 18.10.2012, 23:26 | Message # 20
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Guys, an astronomer told me that a planet like this (RS 5584-348-9-47060633-23 3) can't have an atmosphere because of the solar winds. What's your opinion?

Edited by NeapolitanBoy - Thursday, 18.10.2012, 23:28
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Thursday, 18.10.2012, 23:40 | Message # 21
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Quote (NeapolitanBoy)
What's your opinion?

That planet probably could have an atmosphere. It depends on a lot of things, of course. But given its mass, and how thick of an atmosphere it may have had in the past, it's not unreasonable. It may be in the process of losing its atmosphere, or maybe it has a magnetic field. Look at Venus, for example: no magnetism, relatively close to the sun, been losing atmosphere for billions of years, and yet it still has nearly 90 atm of pressure. So it's possible.





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smjjamesDate: Thursday, 18.10.2012, 23:41 | Message # 22
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Quote (NeapolitanBoy)
Guys, an astronomer told me that a planet like this (RS 5584-348-9-47060633-23 3) can't have an atmosphere because of the solar winds. What's your opinion?



^This one? Just checking in case we have different settings.

I don't know anything about the solar wind intesnsity of a red dwarf, let alone at that distance (they are known for having big flares though) and I'm not sure if tidally locked worlds would have a magnetic field, but IF it has a magnetic field, it should protect the atmosphere from the solar wind.

Attachments: 8223011.jpg(197Kb)





 
HarbingerDawnDate: Friday, 19.10.2012, 00:08 | Message # 23
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I'm not sure if tidally locked worlds would have a magnetic field

Normally I would agree, but its rotation period is much shorter than Mercury's, yet Mercury has a weak but significant magnetic field. It depends on the driving mechanism for the field.





All forum users, please read this!
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