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Forum » SpaceEngine » General Discussions » Question about tidally locked planets
Question about tidally locked planets
NeapolitanBoyDate: Wednesday, 19.09.2012, 17:13 | Message # 1
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Hi, everybody.

I am very happy that tidally locked planets have two different faces (as in real universe) in this fantastic software!

However, I'd have a little question:
when the software indicates the mean temperature of these planets, does it consider the presence of a very cold dark face?

Thank you.
 
smjjamesDate: Wednesday, 19.09.2012, 17:23 | Message # 2
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I don't really know how the thermal convection dynamics on a tidally locked planet would affect the average temperature, but that is definetly a very good question there.




 
CyberItalianDate: Wednesday, 19.09.2012, 17:25 | Message # 3
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well, i think that the engine considers the day-night horizont's temperature, as logic would suggest wacko

Edited by CyberItalian - Wednesday, 19.09.2012, 17:25
 
NeapolitanBoyDate: Wednesday, 19.09.2012, 17:32 | Message # 4
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I asked an astronomer how the mean temperature would be on a tidally locked planet. Well, at the beginning, I thought what you think, CyberItalian, but then he replied: "The mean temperature would be very low, if the dark face didn'thave an atmosphere."
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Wednesday, 19.09.2012, 17:43 | Message # 5
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SE calculates the mean temperature. The dark side being cold does not lower the mean temperature since the day side would be hot. However, the mean temperature is not necessarily the same thing as the temperature along the terminator.




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NeapolitanBoyDate: Wednesday, 19.09.2012, 17:53 | Message # 6
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HarbingerDawn, thank you for your reply.

I had always thought what you think, but, one day, an astronomer told me that, if the planet atmosphere is not very dense, the dark face has a uniform temperature of - 270 Celsius, which would make the mean temperature of the planet very very low.

I am confused. If I use logic, however, I exactly think what you think.
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Wednesday, 19.09.2012, 17:59 | Message # 7
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Quote (NeapolitanBoy)
the dark face has a uniform temperature of - 270 Celsius, which would make the mean temperature of the planet very very low.

Yes, the dark face would have a uniform temperature of 3 K (if it is a small world with little internal heat) but keep in mind that the lit face could have a temperature of 500 K, 800 K, 1500 K, or maybe even higher. So the average temperature of the planet could still be quite hot, even if its dark side is very cold.





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NeapolitanBoyDate: Wednesday, 19.09.2012, 19:37 | Message # 8
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Quote (HarbingerDawn)
Yes, the dark face would have a uniform temperature of 3 K (if it is a small world with little internal heat) but keep in mind that the lit face could have a temperature of 500 K, 800 K, 1500 K, or maybe even higher. So the average temperature of the planet could still be quite hot, even if its dark side is very cold.


Oh, perfect.
Thank you.
So things are as I thought they were.
smile
 
apenpaapDate: Thursday, 20.09.2012, 12:51 | Message # 9
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And that is with no thermal conductance at all. Even a trace of an atmosphere would conduct heat, and I'm guessing the planet itself would also conduct a little heat all the way to the other side. It's still going to be very cold on the far side, though.




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NeapolitanBoyDate: Thursday, 04.10.2012, 14:32 | Message # 10
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Hello everybody,

thank you for your replies about tidally-locked planets.

I've found a beautiful tidally-locked warm Terra in Space Engine and I was asking about the possibility for some kind of life forms to exist there.
I'd have some questions:

1) Even though an atmosphere is present (0,8 atm), it's still true that life is impossible in both the hot pole and the dark side. Right?

2) I've noticed some water also near the hot pole. Should I imagine this water to be boiling water?

3) Does "Space Engine" take libration in latitude into account?

4) What about rain in this kind of planets?
 
Donatelo200Date: Thursday, 04.10.2012, 20:35 | Message # 11
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Not necessarily. With a 0.8 ATM the heat would be transferred from the day to the night relatively efficiently. The night would be like the Antarctic and the part directly facing the star would be like the Sahara. liquid water,life,animals,rain,snow and fungi would occur on both the day and night side. Plants would be really the only one's affected due to their need for starlight. Terminator animals would be able to venture the the day and night side unlike the rest though. Oh also no water would boil at the temp on the day side probably wouldn't reach more than 170F unless the planet was on the inner edge of the habitable zone. in which case would probably trigger a runaway greenhouse effect.




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Edited by Donatelo200 - Thursday, 04.10.2012, 20:36
 
NeapolitanBoyDate: Friday, 05.10.2012, 11:23 | Message # 12
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Quote (Donatelo200)
Not necessarily. With a 0.8 ATM the heat would be transferred from the day to the night relatively efficiently. The night would be like the Antarctic and the part directly facing the star would be like the Sahara. liquid water,life,animals,rain,snow and fungi would occur on both the day and night side. Plants would be really the only one's affected due to their need for starlight. Terminator animals would be able to venture the the day and night side unlike the rest though. Oh also no water would boil at the temp on the day side probably wouldn't reach more than 170F unless the planet was on the inner edge of the habitable zone. in which case would probably trigger a runaway greenhouse effect.


Thank you, Donatelo200.
This is the planet: RS 5584-348-9-47060633-23 3.
In your opinion, is this planet programmed the way you see things? I think so: I think you are right.
 
Donatelo200Date: Friday, 05.10.2012, 12:01 | Message # 13
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Whoa that's a hot planet. This planets oceans would vaporize on the day since it's average temp is near boiling on its own. It would have likely suffered a runaway greenhouse effect like venus exept being more massive the atmosphere would be approx 400 Atm with a surface temp above 900k. This is an example of where SE's atmosphere model and Hydrodynamics model fall short of reality.




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Edited by Donatelo200 - Friday, 05.10.2012, 12:02
 
NeapolitanBoyDate: Friday, 05.10.2012, 12:38 | Message # 14
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Quote (Donatelo200)
Whoa that's a hot planet. This planets oceans would vaporize on the day since it's average temp is near boiling on its own. It would have likely suffered a runaway greenhouse effect like venus exept being more massive the atmosphere would be approx 400 Atm with a surface temp above 900k. This is an example of where SE's atmosphere model and Hydrodynamics model fall short of reality.


You are right: water should boil at 94°C on this planet.
Do we want to tell this to SpaceEngineer?
I think it's important.
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Friday, 05.10.2012, 13:16 | Message # 15
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NeapolitanBoy, you have already discussed this planet here, there is no reason to create a new thread about it. If you think it is a bug that should be fixed, post it in the bug reports thread.




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