Русский New site

Advanced search

[ New messages · Forum rules · Members ]
Page 21 of 36«1219202122233536»
Forum » SpaceEngine » Space Journeys » Space anomalies
Space anomalies
HarbingerDawnDate: Wednesday, 10.12.2014, 09:02 | Message # 301
Cosmic Curator
Group: Administrators
United States
Messages: 8714
Status: Offline
Quote isdebesl ()
is it rare a selena has atmosphere?

No, it's not very rare.





All forum users, please read this!
My SE mods and addons
Phenom II X6 1090T 3.2 GHz, 16 GB DDR3 RAM, GTX 970 3584 MB VRAM
 
1410Date: Wednesday, 10.12.2014, 19:50 | Message # 302
Observer
Group: Newbies
Finland
Messages: 6
Status: Offline
I have once found a VERY strange planet. The only strange thing was the life on it, though. It had BOTH multicellular AND exotic. Also, if I remember correctly, it was green and orange too.
 
relox84Date: Wednesday, 10.12.2014, 20:38 | Message # 303
Space Tourist
Group: Users
France
Messages: 21
Status: Offline
This isn't strange, this is just a Titan with oceans of liquid methane, with exotic methane-based life forms living on the surface.
This type of lifeform is actually quite common in the SE universe.
 
NickWaterfallDate: Monday, 05.01.2015, 23:51 | Message # 304
Space Tourist
Group: Users
Norway
Messages: 23
Status: Offline


That's a big planet lol
 
apenpaapDate: Monday, 05.01.2015, 23:56 | Message # 305
World Builder
Group: Users
Antarctica
Messages: 1063
Status: Offline
Wow, nice find! I've found gas giants close to their star that size (they've actually been found in reality too!) But an ice giant? That's really weird. Look at its miniscule surface gravity...




I occasionally stream at http://www.twitch.tv/magistermystax. Sometimes SE, sometimes other games.
 
Donatelo200Date: Tuesday, 06.01.2015, 00:08 | Message # 306
Explorer
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 261
Status: Offline
Oh that's nothing here is one that has negative g's at the equator. biggrin

Attachments: 3495157.jpg(196Kb)





CPU: Intel Core i7-4790K
GPU: Nvidia GTX 1080
SSD: Samsung 850 Evo 250GB
HDD: Toshiba DT01ACA200 2TB
HDD: WD Blue 1TB (2012)
RAM: Unknown 16G-D3-1600-MR 2x8GB
MBD: MSI Z97S SLI Krait Edition (MS-7922)
 
FireintheholeDate: Tuesday, 06.01.2015, 00:24 | Message # 307
Pioneer
Group: Translators
Sweden
Messages: 356
Status: Offline
Quote Donatelo200 ()
Oh that's nothing here is one that has negative g's at the equator.

Does that mean you get pushed away into space? tongue





Love SpaceEngine!
 
FastFourierTransformDate: Tuesday, 06.01.2015, 11:12 | Message # 308
Pioneer
Group: Local Moderators
Spain
Messages: 542
Status: Offline
Wow! that density. This planet is just a spheroid of gravitationaly confined air!! and has that size due to the inertial forces generated by the rotation. More than a planet it looks like a strange cloud or nebulae orbiting a star (extremely tiny bok globule???). How can that continues to exist with that temperature? Is that big because that bunch of air has heated and therefore inflating the "planet" as a balloon? or in reality that airy object at that temperatures would be dissipated?
 
CanapinDate: Wednesday, 07.01.2015, 10:05 | Message # 309
Astronaut
Group: Users
France
Messages: 52
Status: Offline
Not sure this is an anomaly.



This is a binary system. Where is the second star ?



Edited by Canapin - Wednesday, 07.01.2015, 10:05
 
TheOutsiderDate: Wednesday, 07.01.2015, 17:38 | Message # 310
Observer
Group: Users
Antarctica
Messages: 12
Status: Offline
Quote
This is a binary system. Where is the second star ?

Not very far smile

Attachments: 4387367.jpg(193Kb)
 
Atheist101Date: Wednesday, 07.01.2015, 18:29 | Message # 311
Astronaut
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 47
Status: Offline
Have a couple things to post. These are black holes in a system that are either orbiting way to close to the star or going through the star. I guess its more of a bug thing then an anomaly but i thought it should go here.





 
MalzMDate: Thursday, 08.01.2015, 00:44 | Message # 312
Observer
Group: Newbies
Germany
Messages: 8
Status: Offline
Just found a solar system with 5 stars. Got no idea if it's really that rare (even though it must be extremly unstable) but I just found a 5-star system without a black hole!
Did not manage to find a similar one, so I think it's quite a good shot.

At first they look like three stars, but what looks like 2 stars (at the right)...



...are actually 4!




Attachments: 6485515.jpg(153Kb) · 0509106.jpg(149Kb) · 4815221.jpg(233Kb)


Edited by MalzM - Thursday, 08.01.2015, 00:50
 
WatsisnameDate: Thursday, 08.01.2015, 05:53 | Message # 313
Galaxy Architect
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 2611
Status: Offline
Not exceptionally rare, no. You can even find systems with much more than 5, and we know of a few in real life as well. smile

They aren't tremendously unstable, either. (If they were, they wouldn't exist very long.) Stability in n-body dynamics, where each particle is of a roughly similar mass, follows a sort of binary addition rule. I.e. stars group into separated pairings, and pairs of pairs, etc, rather than triangles or squares. The configuration is stable as long as no 3 stars stay at similar distances from one another. So stable multi-star systems may look like these, where each step up on the number of spaces represents a much bigger distance:

I (a single star)
II (a binary, which may have any kind of separation)
II..I (a binary made up of a tight binary and a single star)
II..II (a binary of binaries)
II..II......I (same as above, now with a single much farther out -- a quintuple star system)
II......II..I (another way to make a quintuple: a binary of a binary plus a trinary)
II..II......II (a binary containing a binary binary with another binary.) [That's a mouthful]

And you get the idea.

Unstable configurations may look like these:
III (a triangle)
I..I..I (a bigger triangle)
II..II..I (a big triangle where 2 points are binaries and the third is a single star)
I..I..I..I (a square)
And so forth.





 
NickWaterfallDate: Thursday, 08.01.2015, 08:20 | Message # 314
Space Tourist
Group: Users
Norway
Messages: 23
Status: Offline
Here's a septuple system (7 red dwarfs)
RS 0-7-944688-366-118-8-9072373-10

They're separated like this: (II .. II) .. (I .. II)

I wonder if there are octuple systems..
 
MalzMDate: Thursday, 08.01.2015, 09:35 | Message # 315
Observer
Group: Newbies
Germany
Messages: 8
Status: Offline
But the chance for them to get into such a formation must be pretty low, especially with a count as high as 7 :O...

Did not know that they are actually so common :O I now officially declare it my job to find the SE system with the highest count of stars (without black hole)!


Edited by MalzM - Thursday, 08.01.2015, 09:40
 
Forum » SpaceEngine » Space Journeys » Space anomalies
Page 21 of 36«1219202122233536»
Search: