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Forum » SpaceEngine » Space Journeys » The joys of random exploration: Betelgeuse and Carbon Star (Who knows what could you find by flying randomly?)
The joys of random exploration: Betelgeuse and Carbon Star
PulsedFissionDate: Friday, 13.03.2015, 23:34 | Message # 1
Observer
Group: Users
Spain
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Hi everyone!

I just wanted to share two impressive findings I got today by flying entirely at random on the Milky Way.

1.- Last time I played SE, some weeks ago, I was visiting the surroundings on the Horse Nebula. Today I decided to fly away from it relatively slowly, so I could find the faintest stars. After a minute or so, I saw a quite bright yellow star. Since I hadn't seen that many yellow giants, I decided to visit it. It was enormous. I then jumped to one of its planets via the F2 menu.

Then I saw its name, and realized that star was Betelgeuse itself.

Of all stars in a radius of several hundred lightyears away from the Horse Nebula, what's the chance of finding a single, named star?

2.- Just after that, I continued my "slow" flight. This time I wanted to focus on the faintest stars and not get lured by the giants. After some groups of stars, I saw one that looked interesting enough. Not exactly the faintest or smallest, but not exactly easily noticeable. I clicked on it to know more about it. Then I saw:

Type --- Carbon Star

Really?! I didn't even know those existed, not even in real life: I had to visit the Internet to investigate about these "carbon stars" (btw, after reading some articles about them, it seems they have "an striking ruby color"; maybe they could have their color updated on a future update?). I spent some time on its planets: one of them is so close to the star it literally is inside its flares, and it's burning away. Sadly, all of them are lifeless.

Again, what's the chance of finding one of these? All of this happened just a few minutes ago and I can't believe my luck.

Here you are some pictures. You'll see my SE is in Spanish, but you have the star code in case you want to visit it.

Attachments: 9004189.jpg(255Kb) · 6352240.jpg(186Kb)
 
QuontexDate: Friday, 13.03.2015, 23:42 | Message # 2
Explorer
Group: Users
Australia
Messages: 155
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I think somewhere on these forums it is said carbon stars are a bug or very buggy themselves(Either one). Carbon stars don't generate randomly in SE(Nor do blue giants I've found unless in Black hole systems), It would be nice to see a ruby red star. With finding a named star, it just depends on where you are if you are flying in and around the solar system you have a higher chance then flying in a random galaxy on the edge of the universe. Nice fond though.




 
DiscovererOfWorldsDate: Saturday, 14.03.2015, 17:19 | Message # 3
Space Pilot
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Italy
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did you find interesting places, normally, as it would in real life you can find places really strange after all there were millions of stars near the horse nebula many strange places you could find?




the universe is made to be explored, but no one will ever visit it all
 
parameciumkidDate: Sunday, 15.03.2015, 04:59 | Message # 4
Explorer
Group: Users
United States
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I'm pretty sure I've run across a procedural carbon star before, although of course now that I go back in to check I can't find one to save my life xD




Intel HD Graphics 4000 ;P
 
apenpaapDate: Sunday, 15.03.2015, 12:11 | Message # 5
World Builder
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Antarctica
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Quote PulsedFission ()
Then I saw its name, and realized that star was Betelgeuse itself.

Of all stars in a radius of several hundred lightyears away from the Horse Nebula, what's the chance of finding a single, named star?


Betelgeuse's brightness makes it more likely than you'd think. Deneb is even easier to randomly stumble upon: it's bright enough to still be visible from outside the Milky Way. I used to have a good method for finding Earth from outside the Milky Way by eye only using these stars, and a couple other bright, named giants.





I occasionally stream at http://www.twitch.tv/magistermystax. Sometimes SE, sometimes other games.
 
PulsedFissionDate: Monday, 16.03.2015, 11:58 | Message # 6
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Group: Users
Spain
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Quote DiscovererOfWorlds ()
did you find interesting places, normally, as it would in real life you can find places really strange after all there were millions of stars near the horse nebula many strange places you could find?

Not yet, but there surely are a ton of amazing places in there too!

Quote apenpaap ()

Betelgeuse's brightness makes it more likely than you'd think. Deneb is even easier to randomly stumble upon: it's bright enough to still be visible from outside the Milky Way. I used to have a good method for finding Earth from outside the Milky Way by eye only using these stars, and a couple other bright, named giants.

That is very true. I am very happy to have found it though! smile
Oh! Your method makes quite sense. Did you do find Earth by using it?
 
Forum » SpaceEngine » Space Journeys » The joys of random exploration: Betelgeuse and Carbon Star (Who knows what could you find by flying randomly?)
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