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Forum » SpaceEngine » Space Journeys » Challenge: Find a new home! (I've been searching for a while, but nothing's very good...)
Challenge: Find a new home!
PortalmellDate: Friday, 02.01.2015, 23:44 | Message # 76
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Stargate38, the gravity is too low.

EDIT: removed part of it.







Edited by Portalmell - Saturday, 03.01.2015, 05:41
 
WatsisnameDate: Saturday, 03.01.2015, 02:16 | Message # 77
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It's not nearly that straightforward. Atmospheric loss rate depends on composition, escape speed, and temperature of the exobase (not surface). SE actually calculates this, and my suspicion is that it produced this result because although the escape speed is very low (~4% of Earth's) and although the surface is heated to Earth-like temperatures via tidal forces (though maybe exaggerating this via a bug), the temperature of the upper atmosphere is going to be very low due to lack of strong insolation.

More simply, it's probably giving this planet a thick atmosphere because it calculates loss rates before/without tidal heating.





 
PortalmellDate: Saturday, 03.01.2015, 06:07 | Message # 78
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RS 0-2-56-1059-1389-7-1463099-1149 4 "Fasre"

RS 0-2-56-1059-1389-6-182887-447 5 "Azeses"

RS 0-2-56-1059-1389-6-182890-7107 4 "Waher"

RS 0-2-56-1059-1389-6-182890-3740 4 "Wof"

RS 0-2-56-1059-1389-6-182887-756 4 "Fasrws"

Attachments: 4899727.jpg(390Kb) · 8441121.jpg(421Kb) · 9552133.jpg(410Kb) · 5467793.jpg(421Kb) · 3896818.jpg(409Kb)







Edited by Portalmell - Saturday, 03.01.2015, 06:16
 
WatsisnameDate: Saturday, 03.01.2015, 07:49 | Message # 79
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Nice finds. The first (Fasre) is my favorite and the most similar to Earth. Azesus would be neat, too, being the only one with terrestrial life. Probably most comfortable at the poles or mountain tops though.

Interesting that they all have rotation periods in the 12 to 15 hour range, and that 4 of the 5 spin retrograde.





 
Tangle10Date: Saturday, 03.01.2015, 18:59 | Message # 80
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Quote Watsisname ()
That's much colder than ice age temperatures

...But much warmer than the coldest inhabited place on Earth (-50 C?!)

Quote Portalmell ()
Tangle10 can you add my planets I found on page 4?

So many planets...

Adding everything from page 4 and up that's in 0.97.2.





Tips for finding Earth-Like planets: Look for F, G, or K Class stars. M class habitables will almost always be tidelocked. Oceanias can, of course, also be habitable, they just have tiny amounts of land.

Edited by Tangle10 - Saturday, 03.01.2015, 21:10
 
Tac1017Date: Saturday, 03.01.2015, 21:26 | Message # 81
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\ Tangle10, Shouldn't a planet have a moderately sized planetary companion to be on this list? I watched a universe show on the tv, and a planetary companion helps stabilize tides and axial tilt, which are both very important if intelligent life is to evolve. Otherwise, life forms would need to constantly adapt to new weather changes and wildly changing migration seasons.




The Terra Hunter of the Milky Way!

(By the way, I was born in 2001, NOT 1972 XD)
 
Tangle10Date: Saturday, 03.01.2015, 21:28 | Message # 82
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It does, but this is actually slightly more towards human habitation. Life can be found anywhere...




Tips for finding Earth-Like planets: Look for F, G, or K Class stars. M class habitables will almost always be tidelocked. Oceanias can, of course, also be habitable, they just have tiny amounts of land.
 
Tac1017Date: Saturday, 03.01.2015, 22:15 | Message # 83
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Here are two more, but these seem a bit more extreme than Sionol, although the are still in the Challenge parameters.



Attachments: 6840021.jpg(147Kb) · 7236066.jpg(177Kb)





The Terra Hunter of the Milky Way!

(By the way, I was born in 2001, NOT 1972 XD)


Edited by Tac1017 - Saturday, 03.01.2015, 22:16
 
spacerDate: Tuesday, 06.01.2015, 17:35 | Message # 84
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ok i think i found a winner! earth twin! look! everything is good just the day long is 15h!! the tem! the gravity! the atm pressure! the semi majoraxis! the year long! the mass! the size!
happy smile happy smile happy biggrin wink

Attachments: 4265436.jpg(370Kb)





"we began as wanderers, and we are wanderers still"
-carl sagan

-space engine photographer


Edited by spacer - Tuesday, 06.01.2015, 17:38
 
WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 06.01.2015, 21:37 | Message # 85
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Quote Tangle10 ()
...But much warmer than the coldest inhabited place on Earth (-50 C?!)


But the global average is not -50C. If it was, the entire ocean would freeze over, the hydrologic cycle would shut down, the surface biosphere would collapse, and you would not have humans living anywhere. Oops. smile

This is why it is important to understand the difference between local vs. global average temperature when contemplating prospects for habitability. People living in significantly subzero locations on Earth depend on the fact that it is warmer elsewhere. The global average is about +15C. Change that average by just a few degrees, and you have significant consequences on the climate. Reduce it by 4C, and you have ice sheets extending into otherwise temperate climates. Increase it by 8C, and the poles become tropical.

Now read about snowball Earth climates (Wikipedia has a fairly good article on it). That's what a -8C world would look like. Could you survive in it? Maybe. But why would you want to?

Added: Spacer, that's a beautiful planet, and I think the closest to Earth's parameters I've ever seen. Very nice!





 
Tangle10Date: Thursday, 08.01.2015, 01:31 | Message # 86
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The temperature stuff is true. Really, I'd think that by the time we got into deep space, we would know how to modify ourselves to the planet or the planet to ourselves. Also, it's interesting with the temperatures of Portalmell's planets- reminds you that Earth is really just a postglacial melting snowball on the chilly edge of the water temp zone.




Tips for finding Earth-Like planets: Look for F, G, or K Class stars. M class habitables will almost always be tidelocked. Oceanias can, of course, also be habitable, they just have tiny amounts of land.
 
WatsisnameDate: Thursday, 08.01.2015, 05:15 | Message # 87
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I think so, too, and this also makes me wonder which of these are easier, given a premise of the advanced technology that comes in an era of interstellar travel:
(a) adapting ourselves to a new world
(b) terraforming a new world to suit ourselves
© finding/reaching a different and more suitable world

I can't decide -- lot of interesting hypotheticals to ponder. smile And of course a and b may mix together somewhat.





 
Tangle10Date: Thursday, 08.01.2015, 20:42 | Message # 88
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In an era of interstellar travel, I'd expect a and c to be easier than b- a whole world being changed as opposed to what we can just about already do.




Tips for finding Earth-Like planets: Look for F, G, or K Class stars. M class habitables will almost always be tidelocked. Oceanias can, of course, also be habitable, they just have tiny amounts of land.
 
NotRodDate: Friday, 09.01.2015, 22:31 | Message # 89
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The first one:
RS 8409-1357-7-899739-219 4.2
The most earth-like planet i ever found, it's inside a Nebula, too bad that one earth day there last 10 days..
The second one:
HIP 14922 4

Both are in the milky way

Attachments: 4730928.png(343Kb) · 2482730.png(324Kb)
 
abyssoftDate: Saturday, 10.01.2015, 03:53 | Message # 90
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NotRod I think both have too low gravity and atmo pres.
 
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