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Forum » SpaceEngine » Space Journeys » Challenge: The Photodetective Game
Challenge: The Photodetective Game
DeathStarDate: Wednesday, 12.02.2014, 22:56 | Message # 61
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Quote JCandeias ()
No, it's an oceania, partially obscured by a moon (asteroidal, possibly) in eclipse. So I guess the oceania itself is also a moon, revolving around a gas giant. The sun seems to be a G or F star.


One tiny detail is incorrect.


Edited by DeathStar - Wednesday, 12.02.2014, 22:58
 
JCandeiasDate: Wednesday, 12.02.2014, 23:06 | Message # 62
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Quote DeathStar ()
One tiny detail is incorrect.


The eclipsed moon isn't irregular, but oblate?

(and is it a detail that you can get from the image?)





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UnnamedDate: Wednesday, 12.02.2014, 23:13 | Message # 63
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Sometimes Spherical objects cause non-circular shadows (But after some time the shadow gets circular)
It depends on something i can't really explain myself.





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DeathStarDate: Wednesday, 12.02.2014, 23:32 | Message # 64
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Quote JCandeias ()
The eclipsed moon isn't irregular, but oblate?


Nope.
 
JCandeiasDate: Wednesday, 12.02.2014, 23:52 | Message # 65
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Hm... I don't find any other interpretation with just a tiny detail off. The only other interpretation of this image I can come up with is very different.

An oceania, eclipsed by one moon, quite large. Probably of terra or desert size, if the oceania is one of the big ones. A selena if it isn't. The "missing" part is not an eclipsed moon, but the shadow of the eclipsing moon. And the borders of that shadow are so crisp that the star has to be very far away, enough to be basicly a dot in the sky, in which case it has to be a blue or blue-white star, otherwise the planet would freeze over.





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apenpaapDate: Thursday, 13.02.2014, 00:01 | Message # 66
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I think that isn't a shadow. I think it is an asteroidal object on the foreground. The reason it's entirely dark is that it's either on the opposite side of the sun (and therefore has the dark side to us) or it's a moon and in its planet's shadow. Using a very low FOV, the planet looks as big as the asteroid, which is actually on the foreground.

And the planet is an oceania.





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DeathStarDate: Thursday, 13.02.2014, 00:10 | Message # 67
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JCandeias, no, your original idea was correct, it is a moon eclipsed by another moon, but you mentioned a detail near the end that is incorrect(I dont mean the star spectrum)
 
JCandeiasDate: Thursday, 13.02.2014, 00:16 | Message # 68
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Ah. If it's a question of the primary not being a gas giant, then that can't be derived from the image. Ditto on the possibility of the star being a close binary. Remember: deduction game, not guessing game.




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Edited by JCandeias - Thursday, 13.02.2014, 00:17
 
DeathStarDate: Thursday, 13.02.2014, 00:29 | Message # 69
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JCandeias, correct, the primary isn't a gas giant. Yes, I know this isn't a guessing game, but I had to count it as incorrect due to the fact that:

1. You yourself didn't have any proof that there is a primary and that it is a gas giant. If you just skipped that detail, it would have been correct immediately. Even if there was a primary that is a gas giant and it wasn't on the image, trust me, I wouldn't demand that you know that detail.

2. So far in SE, I have never encountered a moon that would get that close to another moon, except for some small, inner moons or irregular outer moons crossing orbits. Since a moon of that size can't be anywhere near the inner areas of the SOI of the primary, and getting an irregular, outer moon to get eclipsed by another irregular, outer moon, all at the same time while making a very close pass with a third irregular moon is practically impossible, you can kind of conclude that the oceania isn't a moon.

Your turn.
 
JCandeiasDate: Thursday, 13.02.2014, 00:44 | Message # 70
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First point, fair enough. On your second point, objects don't have to be close to seem to be close, and if you take pictures from large distances, you can very much get such effects. I'll soon post in the image dump thread a couple of pictures showing this. Maybe tomorrow. Maybe later.

Anyway, here you go. What do we have here? One hint: no objects are directly overlapping in this scene.


Attachments: 7035673.jpg(145Kb)





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UnnamedDate: Thursday, 13.02.2014, 01:12 | Message # 71
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A Orange Dwarf makes a sunrise on a hot desert, and you can see a planet getting scorched and its atmosphere evaporated by the Orange dwarf, along with some other stars, planets and moons in the background?




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Edited by Unnamed - Thursday, 13.02.2014, 01:13
 
JCandeiasDate: Thursday, 13.02.2014, 01:26 | Message # 72
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Not entirely correct, but I'll accept it. This is actually a terra, and a temperate one -- it isn't as close to the sun as it seems due to a lower than normal field of view -- but since some deserts can also produce scenes like this I'll count it as right. The big blob in the sky is indeed an evaporating planet. And then there's a bunch of other members of the system, in line with the evaporating planet, and background stars scattered about.

Your turn.





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UnnamedDate: Thursday, 13.02.2014, 01:28 | Message # 73
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This one is quite easy
Should i put in a harder one?
Edit:
Ill just change it.
What about this one?

Edit2:
This one is easier and better, and i know what it is.

Last edit:
Actually ill put this one, it is 0.97 tho like the 3rd one.





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Edited by Unnamed - Thursday, 13.02.2014, 02:01
 
DisasterpieceDate: Thursday, 13.02.2014, 02:54 | Message # 74
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A desert moon orbiting a gas or ice giant. They orbit an orange star. The picture is in the milky way. An evaporating planet is orbiting close to the star and spewing dust and atmosphere across the image.




I play teh spase engien
 
UnnamedDate: Thursday, 13.02.2014, 03:03 | Message # 75
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Correct!
That was quite easy
Your turn.





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