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Forum » SpaceEngine » Space Journeys » Fear of Black Holes
Fear of Black Holes
WillocrispDate: Monday, 19.01.2015, 08:48 | Message # 46
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Quote FastFourierTransform ()
Fear of Black holes? Then watch this


I literally watched all 61 minutes of this, and I enjoyed it.
 
WatsisnameDate: Monday, 19.01.2015, 18:56 | Message # 47
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Quote Tangle10 ()
humans have hair.
Dogs exist.
Fish exist.
human language makes sense.


tongue

Ok I'll put it this way:
It is possible for us to be surrounded by an event horizon (and I mean a black hole event horizon, not just the cosmological event horizon which is a different sort of thing), without us having any way of knowing it.

This sounds pretty absurd because when we think of the interior of a black hole, we usually think it must be dark (which is actually wrong), that there must be extremely strong gravitational tidal forces (which is true), and that there must be a singularity which all things inexorably move towards and get crushed at (which is also true). In other words, we'd think that if we were actually inside a black hole then this must be obvious. However, the very definition of a black hole (specifically its event horizon) allows for a scenario in which a region can be bounded by a horizon and have no way of knowing about it (at least not right away). To see this, consider the following scenario:

Imagine that somewhere way out there is a gigantic spherical shell of material which surrounds the Earth (Earth need not be at the exact center).

Because the gravitational field outside of a spherical shell is exactly the same as if all of the mass of the shell were instead condensed to a point at its center, it is very easy to calculate how strong this shell's external gravitational field will be. If the mass of the shell is sufficiently large, the escape velocity at its surface could be greater than the speed of light, thus forming an event horizon.

It can be shown that the condition for a shell producing an event horizon around itself is:



To give an example, this means a shell which is 20 million light years in diameter, one meter thick, and having the density of water, would form a black hole.

But what about the inside of the shell? One of the funky things about how the mathematics works out is that the field inside of a spherical shell is everywhere zero. If you have a hollow sphere of charge, the electric field inside is zero, and if you have a hollow sphere of mass, the gravitational field inside is also zero. Not just at the exact center, but everywhere inside. So even though in this scenario the Earth is surrounded by an event horizon which is impossible to escape from, (and is therefore inside a black hole!), this gravitational field does not show up at all on the inside. There is no singularity, and there no tidal forces.

But of course this shell of material cannot remain fixed, because it is also inside the horizon (it is smaller than its own Schwarzschild radius). It must collapse. Eventually this collapse would sweep up the Earth and everything else on the inside, and become a singularity. But we can also imagine the shell being very large and therefore we wouldn't become aware of it for a very long time, since the rate it approaches us is limited to c. With a huge amount of planning, one might imagine an advanced civilization trapping some region of space inside such a horizon, and it'd take a lot of time for the victims to even notice it. But it would already be too late.

So yeah. You now have another thing you can be afraid of -- the possibility of being inside a black hole and facing imminent, invisible, and unavoidable doom. You're welcome!

Also, and perhaps more usefully, this example illustrates one of the weird consequences of the definition of a black hole's horizon. It's actually somewhat teleological, meaning it depends upon what happens in the future. Study of the interior geometry of black holes can get extremely challenging for this reason, you have to account for everything that falls into the black hole far in the future.

Edit: Missed writing a factor of c^2 in there.





 
letaxDate: Friday, 23.01.2015, 12:41 | Message # 48
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I feel the same way. I think my brain is freaking out because it cannot make sense of what it is seeing, i.e. it does not have any reference, no way to categorize it, thus labeling it as ambiguous in terms of danger, and what is ambiguous is creepy, so there is sort of "run from it" instinct and fear.
 
DoctorOfSpaceDate: Friday, 23.01.2015, 20:42 | Message # 49
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Quote letax ()
I think my brain is freaking out because it cannot make sense of what it is seeing, i.e. it does not have any reference


Actually there is something you can compare a black hole to.



There isn't anything scary about it.





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thenascarfreak2012Date: Saturday, 24.01.2015, 00:28 | Message # 50
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I have a deep fear for these pitch black pits of nothingness and at the same time a deep fascination, It´s like a love hate thing. Aaaaand you don´t know what I went through to make this Screenshot... shok
Attachments: 1490955.jpg(383Kb)


Edited by thenascarfreak2012 - Saturday, 24.01.2015, 00:37
 
letaxDate: Sunday, 25.01.2015, 15:38 | Message # 51
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I just went to a star closely orbiting (200 AU) a supermassive black hole (more than 6 000 000 Sun masses). I feel very uneasy when I get close to black holes.

Quote thenascarfreak2012 ()
Attachments: 1490955.jpg(383Kb)


This didn't help. cry biggrin
 
thenascarfreak2012Date: Monday, 26.01.2015, 18:31 | Message # 52
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Quote letax ()
I just went to a star closely orbiting (200 AU) a supermassive black hole (more than 6 000 000 Sun masses). I feel very uneasy when I get close to black holes.

Quote thenascarfreak2012 ()
Attachments: 1490955.jpg(383Kb)

This didn't help. cry biggrin


XD I scared you a bit there didn't I?

The funny thing is if you look at it once a day for a while it will loose it's scaryness completely...maybe our brain just has to realise nothing is going to harm you.

I have a little fear of perfectly round shapes and spherical objects in general...so a simple planet or sun can scare the shit out of me in a simulation like this.

A black hole takes this fear a step further because of the darkness from the event horizon and the light distortion around it, taking your field of view almost completely so you only focus on the black sphere coming nearer and nearer...


Edited by thenascarfreak2012 - Monday, 26.01.2015, 21:52
 
chromatic9Date: Tuesday, 27.01.2015, 11:52 | Message # 53
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These make me feel uneasy






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WwadlolDate: Wednesday, 28.01.2015, 01:55 | Message # 54
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chromatic9, Imagine falling down these. And i think most of them are over 100 meters deep.
 
PlutonianEmpireDate: Sunday, 08.02.2015, 01:00 | Message # 55
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Nvm. dry




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Edited by PlutonianEmpire - Monday, 22.02.2016, 07:39
 
GibLitDate: Wednesday, 03.06.2015, 04:16 | Message # 56
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1. Put music on context playing
2. Search for a black hole
3. Face the black hole so that the galactic center or a neighboring star is behind it
4. Slowly descend into the black hole
5. ???
6.


I take bittersweet pleasure in testing my wits.

A Journey into a Black Hole
 
minercreep511Date: Sunday, 09.08.2015, 00:08 | Message # 57
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Despite my fear of black holes, I decided to get right next to it and see how much space-time can get distorted. It reminded me of interstellar *Spoiler alert* When they went in to the black hole.
 
PlutonianEmpireDate: Sunday, 09.08.2015, 02:00 | Message # 58
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You might wanna use actual spoiler tags for that, if you consider it a spoiler. wink

Anyways, since SpaceEngineer fixed the atmosphere glitch on Oceanias, in 0.974 Patch 5 and that they now go black when you go underwater, I figured I'd tweak the context.cfg in the music folder to add the Black Hole music to Oceanias. The Black Hole music definitely makes Oceanias a lot less boring now, IMO! cool





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Edited by PlutonianEmpire - Sunday, 09.08.2015, 02:01
 
aaaDate: Saturday, 15.08.2015, 23:37 | Message # 59
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I don't know why anyone would be afraid of black holes and I see some comments saying how they are somehow antagonists to the universe and therefore humans or something. If anything they're the most beneficial objects to our universe. They're the final resting place of all matter. They don't destroy, they fix all the imperfect kinks and bumps in the space of our universe that are stars and planets and life. Whatever exists in black holes right now will eventually be what the entire universe is composed of. Entropy exists. Gravity exists. That's all you need to know. As long as those two things exist nothing will last forever. Everything will go from complex asymmetrical matter to perfect and symmetrical. There's absolutely no reason to be afraid of that. Black holes are little havens of that perfect stable final form of matter in the midst of chaos and instability. You should be glad that eventually every atom that composes you right now will eventually become that, along with all the other matter in the universe. Humans and all matter with energy are by definition imperfect, as they haven't reached their resting state yet. Black holes are that resting state. They're nothing but beautiful happy
 
WatsisnameDate: Sunday, 16.08.2015, 16:06 | Message # 60
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LOL, good sentiment! biggrin Although I think I prefer the present appearance and habitability of the universe over the black hole era. tongue And then the black holes are themselves not permanent either, and eventually will evaporate to join the diffuse radiation field permeating all of ever-expanding space... though that takes much, much, longer.




 
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