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Forum » SpaceEngine » Space Journeys » The wackiest Terra with Life
The wackiest Terra with Life
Tank7Date: Wednesday, 20.02.2013, 01:11 | Message # 1
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In General Discussions or somewhere I've heard of a Terra with life either orbiting a black hole or in the same system at least where the black hole was a stellar companion.

But anyways, I thought this one was quite interesting! Have a look at the screenshot.
(attached if you feel like DLing conveniently)


I stumbled on this while seeking out various Brown Dwarfs. I find the best way to find Brown Dwarfs is to use Map Mode (F1) and seek out Binary, or Tri+ Red Dwarf systems, the companions are often Brown Dwarfs. I would kind of wonder if life could exist under such a dim reddish light of a brown dwarf of L0 class, and suppose it got to the stage of mammals and/or plants, what kind of adaptations there would be in such a one-colored, low light environment.

Attachments: 1033603.jpg(356Kb)
 
Tallest_SkilDate: Thursday, 28.02.2013, 19:17 | Message # 2
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Get this:

Here's a tidally locked terra… with 5/100 the atmospheric pressure of Earth… with life… orbiting a brown dwarf… which itself orbits a regular yellow star.






 
WatsisnameDate: Thursday, 28.02.2013, 23:00 | Message # 3
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Hi Tallest_Skil, welcome to the forums. smile

That is indeed a very strange planet you found there! Imagine -- two suns in the sky, but the warmth comes from the mostly invisible light of the brown dwarf, while the much brighter sun-like star must feel cold and indifferent.





 
SalvoDate: Friday, 01.03.2013, 15:02 | Message # 4
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The colder part must be very cold when the white star is on the other side wacko




The universe is not required to be in perfect harmony with human ambition.

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(still don't know why everyone is doing this...)
 
SpyroDate: Sunday, 03.03.2013, 00:36 | Message # 5
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That doesn't make sense, how can an alien living around a Brown Dwarf feel COLD around a higher class Main Sequence Star? Don't they produce more heat?




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HarbingerDawnDate: Sunday, 03.03.2013, 03:45 | Message # 6
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Quote (Spyro)
That doesn't make sense, how can an alien living around a Brown Dwarf feel COLD around a higher class Main Sequence Star? Don't they produce more heat?

I think he meant that if they lived on the night side, and the other star was facing the day side of the planet, leaving the night side in total darkness.





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Tallest_SkilDate: Friday, 15.03.2013, 22:16 | Message # 7
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Quote (Watsisname)
Hi Tallest_Skil, welcome to the forums.


Glad to be here. As long as I've been following SE, it's a long time coming.

I recently found a world with three terras with life, all of them MOONS. One of which was the moon of a gas giant whose orbit took it from furthest in the system to closest in the system. But yesterday SE began a crash-on-launch loop that lost my journey log for it.

As unreliable as the journey log is on its own, I've always just written down star locations by hand. Maybe I have it somewhere...





 
NovaSiliskoDate: Saturday, 16.03.2013, 00:19 | Message # 8
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My main goal in SE has been to find a planet with life in a system with a neutron star, less than 1 ly from the supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy. So far, I've found plenty of life-bearing planets within 0.1 pc of the black hole, but none in a neutron star system.

One day I will be successful, and I shall dub that planet the home of the gods themselves.
 
SpyroDate: Thursday, 04.04.2013, 20:28 | Message # 9
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Wow, imagining a Pulsar beaming x-rays all over you while looking into the sky, orbiting something way smaller than the planet your on, seeing a giant gaping hole in the sky distorting everything you see into crazy nonsense, while the galactic radiation from the surrounding stars give you all the heat you need to survive.
The universe is wonderful. cry





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Tallest_SkilDate: Friday, 05.04.2013, 19:25 | Message # 10
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RS 0-6-60231-559-505-9-95648124-48 A6.1


Probably should have had orbits visible to give a sense of scale…

Here's another doozy. Space Engine can't even model it properly, so I'll explain it. This image is with a FOV of 45. Yes, the moon is that big.

It's a temperate terra moon of a gas giant. It orbits at less than 4x its diameter and in a period of 16 hours. Of course, it's 1.5x the size of Earth and has over 3x the gravity.

Oh, and an atmospheric pressure 3793x our own.

With the sizes being what they are, the distance being what it is, and the speed of orbit, wouldn't the entire moon be pure magma, oblate at the equator where it's being pulled toward the giant (and the same in the case of the planet it orbits)?

So I've found a world that has life in the form of magma monsters.







Edited by Tallest_Skil - Saturday, 06.04.2013, 18:02
 
WatsisnameDate: Saturday, 06.04.2013, 02:02 | Message # 11
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Quote (Tallest_Skil)
I'd upload an image, but good luck getting Windows to understand what uploading is.


Uh, are you being serious? Windows can upload things to the internet perfectly fine.
1: Go to an image-uploading website.
2: Select the image(s) you want to upload.
3: ???
4: Profit.

Quote
With the sizes being what they are, the distance being what it is, and the speed of orbit, wouldn't the entire moon be pure magma


Tidal heating occurs because of dissipation of orbital energy via tidal forces. In this case, the moon has already been locked into a synchronous orbit, so there's no heating going on presently. (It could be heated by tidal flexing with other moons, such as what happens with the Galilean satellites, but this is the only moon for that planet).
However, it is only 125 million years old, so it would probably still be molten just because it hasn't had enough time to cool down.

Quote
oblate at the equator where it's being pulled toward the giant (and the same in the case of the planet it orbits)


Not quite; you're confusing oblateness (which is a result of rotation about its own axis), with tidal distortion (which is prolate, or triaxial when you include rotation.)





 
Tallest_SkilDate: Saturday, 06.04.2013, 18:01 | Message # 12
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Quote (Watsisname)
Windows can upload things to the internet perfectly fine.


It just refused to work when I was there last. I've booted back to OS X now, so the image is up.

Quote (Watsisname)
Tidal heating occurs because of dissipation of orbital energy via tidal forces.


Really?

Hypothetical, then: if something 1/2 Moon mass were to hit the moon, there wouldn't be anything like this:


happening, because the Moon's tidally locked?







Edited by Tallest_Skil - Saturday, 06.04.2013, 18:05
 
WatsisnameDate: Saturday, 06.04.2013, 19:31 | Message # 13
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Actually I should have said that it is the dissipation of rotational energy that causes the heating, but tidal forces affect both the rotational and orbital energy of the planet/moon system. But yeah. The way this works is that the planet and moon raise tidal bulges on one another, distorting their shapes into prolate or triaxial spheroids. The bulges themselves also pull on one another, and this affects the orbital evolution of the system.

Let's look at the Earth and Moon as an example. The Moon formed much closer to Earth than it is now, and it is still receding at a rate of a few centimeters per year. Meanwhile, the Earth's rotation rate is slowing down. Why does this happen? Perhaps the best way to see it is with a diagram:


*image is not my own, I took it from aerospaceweb.org

The Earth rotates faster than the Moon orbits (because the Moon is farther than geosynchronous orbit), so the bulge on the Earth gets dragged ahead of the line connecting the Earth and Moon. The Moon pulls back on this bulge, which raises a torque on the Earth that counteracts its spin, so the Earth's rotation rate slows down. Where does the energy go? It is dissipated within the Earth via friction and converted to heat. This actually accounts for about 10% of the total heat transfer across the Earth's surface, mostly through the oceans, so it is not a trivial thing. smile

Meanwhile, the bulge on the Earth leads the moon in its orbit, so it pulls the Moon forward slightly, thus increasing its orbital energy, and the Moon moves to a larger orbit. This process will continue until the Earth's spin rate matches the Moon's orbital period, and both the Earth and Moon will always present the same side to one another. (You may have noticed the Moon is already tidally-locked with the Earth, so we only see one side of it.)

There can be other scenarios with totally different outcomes. For example, if the planet rotates more slowly than its moon orbits, then the tidal forces will increase the planet's spin rate, and its moon will fall into a lower orbit. This is currently happening with Mars' moon Phobos, which will eventually spiral closer to Mars until it is broken apart.

Quote
Hypothetical, then: if something 1/2 Moon mass were to hit the moon, there wouldn't be anything like this *snip* happening, because the Moon's tidally locked?


The moon is tidally-locked with the Earth, meaning it spins at the same rate that it orbits. Therefore there is no dissipation of rotational energy and thus no tidal heating on the Moon. The Earth, however, is not tidally locked with the Moon, and so there is frictional heating within the Earth.

If something with half the Moon's mass were to hit it, the Moon would be thoroughly melted or obliterated by the impact, forming a debris ring around the Earth. The Earth would very likely be affected by debris from the impact as well, so both bodies may end up with molten surfaces. But as for tidal forces, there would not be any significant change as far as the Earth is concerned, except that if the Moon was thoroughly disrupted then ocean tides would cease until a new moon coalesced from the debris.







Edited by Watsisname - Saturday, 06.04.2013, 19:34
 
migratingmynahDate: Monday, 08.04.2013, 13:51 | Message # 14
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This Cold terra with LIFE has an elliptical orbit!






Bye
 
Tallest_SkilDate: Monday, 08.04.2013, 18:58 | Message # 15
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Quote (Watsisname)
post


I knew that image would throw people off…

The bulging. That's all I care about. Between the moon and the object. You're saying that as objects collide, they're NOT going to do this if they're tidally locked?





 
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