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Forum » SpaceEngine » Space Journeys » Particular galactic phenomena
Particular galactic phenomena
viper205Date: Saturday, 27.08.2011, 13:50 | Message # 1
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I was wondering if anyone has come across any accretion disks, pulsars or super novae whilst exploring the universe.
better yet, does space engine even contain any? the only strange thing that i have seen are crazy large stars and black holes.

p.s. is there any reference website one can use when searching for particular stars/formations that works with the search function in space engine?
 
JHillDate: Saturday, 27.08.2011, 15:54 | Message # 2
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I have found super novae remnants, non-pulsing neutron stars, but the strangest thing I found once were colliding galaxies




Sed nos soli stantes. Solus stamus unita.
In multis unum surgimus. Sub una resurgemus totidem.
 
TalismanDate: Saturday, 27.08.2011, 19:02 | Message # 3
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I found a "Zirconium Star" what ever that is, also Neutron Stars.

What's the biggest star you've found? Only around 11 AU here I think. (Also for some reason I found like a 4 AU diameter red dwarf...)





 
viper205Date: Saturday, 27.08.2011, 21:35 | Message # 4
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Haha Well, i haven't found anything quite that big. The largest star that i have seen was 5.xx AU, can't remember exactly.
The thing is that i am using this on my laptop, which is doesn't meet the minimum requirements, so i am not even sure if i would even notice remnants of a super nova or the like hehe. But, i will get to use my desktop later this week, so that i can use this to its potential.
I was wondering though, everything that we see in space engine is in the visible light part of the spectrum, right? so i shouldn't expect to see a formation like this: http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/images/hs-1995-44-a-full_jpg.jpg in full color with it being a combination of gamma rays, x-rays, infrared rays, visible light and microwaves, right?
 
SpaceEngineerDate: Sunday, 28.08.2011, 00:16 | Message # 5
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Supernovae remnants and planetary nebulae are already implemented, but they look somewhat boring. These formations are very small and dim and can be hard to find. So the only way to find them is to use a trick: Press F4 and disable all stuff except nebulae. Then increase magnitude to 15-20, then you should see red and green ones as 'dots.' The reds are the giant diffuse nebulae, and the green are the SNR or planetary ones. Click on one of them, and go to it, but don't forget to reduce magnitude back to 7 before enabling stars (otherwise you will get a big lag due to intensive generation of millions of stars).

Another trick is to increase/decrease magnitude of nebulae only (together with galaxies and clusters), leaving stars at default 7m. To do this, press Shift-[ and Shift-]. You will then see background galaxies and star clusters appearing on the screen (as white dots), so it is still helpful to disable them in F4.

Accretion disks and jets around black holes and neutron stars are still in my TODO list, together with comet tails, volumetric clouds, water and much more stuff.

*





 
viper205Date: Monday, 29.08.2011, 00:07 | Message # 6
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Sweet. I'll be sure too try both those tricks out later. I am really excited to see some of the things that are on your ToDo list.
 
TalismanDate: Monday, 29.08.2011, 01:24 | Message # 7
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Speaking of supernova remnents, found this after a long time of searching.






 
RobbieDate: Monday, 29.08.2011, 13:03 | Message # 8
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Quote (viper205)
I was wondering though, everything that we see in space engine is in the visible light part of the spectrum, right? so i shouldn't expect to see a formation like this: http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/images/hs-1995-44-a-full_jpg.jpg in full color with it being a combination of gamma rays, x-rays, infrared rays, visible light and microwaves, right?


Quote (SpaceEngineer)
Supernovae remnants and planetary nebulae are already implemented, but they look somewhat boring. <snip>


Yes, the nebulae do look boring in the visible light spectrum. smile I would personally love to see composite images of these phenomena in Space-Engine. Besides, composites look way more prettier. cool

Space-Engine could have an advanced imaging technology added later to the game. The exploration mothership will not have viewing windows to see any phenomena anyway. If it's to view space though the ship's onboard monitor screens, then there's nothing stopping those screens being capable of displaying composite imaging of SNRs/nebulae etc, making them far more fascinating to behold. And if the in-game technology is advanced enough, maybe it could even have dynamic composite imaging with cameras/telescopes updating the information in real-time.

So that wonderful Hubble image above and this pretty one here: http://i482.photobucket.com/albums....ced.jpg would enhance Space-Engine's capabilities even more so. smile





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SpaceEngineerDate: Tuesday, 30.08.2011, 10:41 | Message # 9
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I think about introducing multi-spectral rendering in SE. Like Predator's hemlet in the "Aliens vs Predator" film smile It requires more work on galaxy and nebulae rendering, especially on planet renderings. Stars are much easy to make, its colours can be obtained by shifting of Plank function. But how would planets appear in infrared or ultraviolet spectrum? And of course, I have no full IR/UV images for Earth, Mars and other bodies within our solar system (for some of them there is IR images, for some UV, and for some radio etc).

*





 
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