Русский New site

Advanced search

[ New messages · Forum rules · Members ]
Page 1 of 41234»
Forum » SpaceEngine » Space Journeys » Challenge: The Largest Terra/Oceania/Desert/Titan planet
Challenge: The Largest Terra/Oceania/Desert/Titan planet
anonymousgamerDate: Wednesday, 10.10.2012, 01:45 | Message # 1
World Builder
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 1011
Status: Offline
So there was already a Largest Planet thread, but that was with ALL planets. I thought it was fun to hunt down big terrestrial planets, like how fun it was to hunt giant stars. But huge terra planets, IMO, are more hard to find, because their size can be so varied.

So for the posts, just post a screencap of your planet with the HUD so I can see it, and if it beats any records, I'll put in in the opening post. I'll put the 3 largest in the OP. Also, make sure the planet is PROCEDURAL. Catalogs do not count.

By the way, if you find any Selenas that beat records, post that too. I didn't add that to the list because I haven't seen any Selenas with a diameter above 20k.

1st: Donatello (0.9.7)


2nd: spacer (0.9.7?)


3rd: sjoerd (0.9.7.2)





Desktop: FX-8350 4.0 GHz, 8 GB DDR3 RAM, EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 FTW 8 GB, 2 TB HDD, 24 inch 1920x1080 screen
Laptop: Core i5 480M 2.66 GHz (turbo 2.93), 8 GB DDR3 RAM, AMD Radeon HD 6550m 1 GB, 640 GB HDD, 17.3 inch 1600x900 screen
 
smjjamesDate: Wednesday, 10.10.2012, 02:41 | Message # 2
World Builder
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 913
Status: Offline
Quote (anonymousgamer)
So there was already a Largest Planet thread, but that was with ALL planets.


It got derailed with discussion about brown dwarfs though, mainly because the largest 'planets' (aside from a jupiter with a puffed out atmosphere) turned out to actually be brown dwarfs.

Anyways, while this one is actually smaller than those two, it's got yours beat in mass (almost 10 earth masses!) and gravity. It doesn't have all that much water, which would partially explain it's high mass, and it probably has a really big core as well.

As a subset of this challenge, we could find the heaviest gravity (or largest) world with life on it, and this is just about the heaviest that I have seen.


Attachments: 1282824.jpg(392Kb)





 
anonymousgamerDate: Wednesday, 10.10.2012, 02:58 | Message # 3
World Builder
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 1011
Status: Offline
Quote (smjjames)
it's got yours beat in mass (almost 10 earth masses!) and gravity.


That gravity is ridiculous. I wonder how life would have to adapt on such extremes.





Desktop: FX-8350 4.0 GHz, 8 GB DDR3 RAM, EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 FTW 8 GB, 2 TB HDD, 24 inch 1920x1080 screen
Laptop: Core i5 480M 2.66 GHz (turbo 2.93), 8 GB DDR3 RAM, AMD Radeon HD 6550m 1 GB, 640 GB HDD, 17.3 inch 1600x900 screen
 
smjjamesDate: Wednesday, 10.10.2012, 03:19 | Message # 4
World Builder
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 913
Status: Offline
Quote (anonymousgamer)
Quote (smjjames)
it's got yours beat in mass (almost 10 earth masses!) and gravity.

That gravity is ridiculous. I wonder how life would have to adapt on such extremes.


Aquatic life should be okay because the water will support them, but on land, it's another matter entirely.

Any land life will probably be very low to the ground and whatever supporting material they use would have to be extremely strong. The thick atmosphere could allow for flotation bags though.

Whatever evolves there will be alien all right.





 
smjjamesDate: Wednesday, 17.10.2012, 19:59 | Message # 5
World Builder
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 913
Status: Offline
Here are two big Titans.




While I was looking around at planets, I've noticed an odd gap in the diameters, which I'll post on the bug report thread.

Attachments: 2824634.jpg(298Kb) · 4566700.jpg(289Kb)





 
anonymousgamerDate: Wednesday, 17.10.2012, 21:45 | Message # 6
World Builder
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 1011
Status: Offline
Quote (smjjames)
Here are two big Titans.


Nice! I added the second one to the list since it was so big.

If only Earth was as big...





Desktop: FX-8350 4.0 GHz, 8 GB DDR3 RAM, EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 FTW 8 GB, 2 TB HDD, 24 inch 1920x1080 screen
Laptop: Core i5 480M 2.66 GHz (turbo 2.93), 8 GB DDR3 RAM, AMD Radeon HD 6550m 1 GB, 640 GB HDD, 17.3 inch 1600x900 screen
 
Blu3smanDate: Monday, 22.10.2012, 20:11 | Message # 7
Space Tourist
Group: Users
Ukraine
Messages: 28
Status: Offline
Do Ice Worlds count?

Attachments: 3092849.jpg(429Kb)
 
smjjamesDate: Monday, 22.10.2012, 21:02 | Message # 8
World Builder
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 913
Status: Offline
Quote (Blu3sman)
Do Ice Worlds count?


Any planet that isn't a gas/ice giant should count.

Here's a big oceania. It doesn't quite make third place, but it's big all right.


Edit: It loses the attachment when I accidentially click on preview I guess.

Attachments: 7909741.jpg(335Kb)







Edited by smjjames - Monday, 22.10.2012, 22:24
 
anonymousgamerDate: Tuesday, 23.10.2012, 01:25 | Message # 9
World Builder
Group: Global Moderators
United States
Messages: 1011
Status: Offline
Quote (Blu3sman)
Do Ice Worlds count?


Well it really is just a frozen over oceania tongue





Desktop: FX-8350 4.0 GHz, 8 GB DDR3 RAM, EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 FTW 8 GB, 2 TB HDD, 24 inch 1920x1080 screen
Laptop: Core i5 480M 2.66 GHz (turbo 2.93), 8 GB DDR3 RAM, AMD Radeon HD 6550m 1 GB, 640 GB HDD, 17.3 inch 1600x900 screen
 
MartekDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 02:45 | Message # 10
Astronaut
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 76
Status: Offline
What about the smallest? is there a thread for that? If so I have one at my home.

Also whats the largest so far, I can't read the KM's on that one. Is it 100,000 KM ?





5.0 GHz i7 12 Cores
GeForce 680i GTX 2GB
Windows 7 Ultimate
64GB DDR3 RAM


Edited by Martek - Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 02:49
 
smjjamesDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 04:05 | Message # 11
World Builder
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 913
Status: Offline
Quote (Martek)
What about the smallest? is there a thread for that? If so I have one at my home.

Also whats the largest so far, I can't read the KM's on that one. Is it 100,000 KM ?


The smallest would be a dwarf planet or moonlet a few hundred kilometers in size, smaller than that are the asteroids. Actually, SE has spherical objects down to a smaller size than they should be, the limit should be somewhere between that of Vesta and Ceres. Space Engineer should fix this IMO.





 
HarbingerDawnDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 06:49 | Message # 12
Cosmic Curator
Group: Administrators
United States
Messages: 8714
Status: Offline
Quote (smjjames)
Actually, SE has spherical objects down to a smaller size than they should be, the limit should be somewhere between that of Vesta and Ceres

How small a spherical object can be depends on its composition. For example, icy bodies can be spherical at smaller sizes than rocky and metallic bodies. It is also possible for a small object to appear roughly spherical simply by chance, though this would be unlikely.





All forum users, please read this!
My SE mods and addons
Phenom II X6 1090T 3.2 GHz, 16 GB DDR3 RAM, GTX 970 3584 MB VRAM
 
smjjamesDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 07:06 | Message # 13
World Builder
Group: Users
United States
Messages: 913
Status: Offline
Yeah, I meant mass there (which could also be interpreted as size, but whatever on the semantics), and yeah composition would change things, but in general, there is a point where the mass is enough to pull the object into a sphere.

The second sentence was me realizing something and I made a suggestion post about it. I'll leave it up to Space Engineer to decide about what mass an object would be spherical and I actually don't mind the spherical moons a few hundred kilometers in size, I just had a thought about it.

Also, the quoting system doesn't work on mobile (iPad in this case) since you can't really highlight stuff, not that it's a major problem anyway.







Edited by smjjames - Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 07:07
 
HarbingerDawnDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 08:16 | Message # 14
Cosmic Curator
Group: Administrators
United States
Messages: 8714
Status: Offline
Quote (smjjames)
there is a point where the mass is enough to pull the object into a sphere.

The difference in mass needed is even bigger than the difference in radius needed. The mass needed for a rocky/metallic body to achieve hydrostatic equilibrium is much greater than the mass needed for an icy body. There are many spherical icy objects in the Solar system that are less than 1000 km in radius. By contrast, there are no such rocky/metallic bodies.

The smallest known spherical icy body is Mimas, while the smallest spherical rocky/metallic body is Europa, which is more than one thousand times more massive. It is almost certain that a rocky/metallic body smaller than that could be spherical, but none are known to exist in our planetary system.





All forum users, please read this!
My SE mods and addons
Phenom II X6 1090T 3.2 GHz, 16 GB DDR3 RAM, GTX 970 3584 MB VRAM
 
apenpaapDate: Wednesday, 24.10.2012, 12:08 | Message # 15
World Builder
Group: Users
Antarctica
Messages: 1063
Status: Offline
Isn't Ceres rocky too? It's quite a lot smaller than Europa (though still a lot larger than Mimas).




I occasionally stream at http://www.twitch.tv/magistermystax. Sometimes SE, sometimes other games.
 
Forum » SpaceEngine » Space Journeys » Challenge: The Largest Terra/Oceania/Desert/Titan planet
Page 1 of 41234»
Search: